Cultural norms and ties

Cultural norms and ties drive migration, as migration becomes a rite of passage or ‘thing to do’, often linked to notions of masculinity. Immobility becomes associated with shame and notions of failure, further driving migration.

Studies listed under this migration driver refer to the culture of migration, migration as a rite of passage, and religion as a driver of migration.

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Why are you draining your brain? Factors underlying decisions of graduating Lebanese medical students to migrate

Authors Elie A. Akl, Holger Schunemann, Nancy Maroun, ...
Year 2007
Journal Name Social science & medicine, 2019, Vol. 222, pp. 11-19
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1 Journal Article

Young people and migration from contemporary Poland

Authors Anne White
Year 2010
Journal Name Journal of Youth Studies, 2012, 15, 2, 241-256
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2 Journal Article

Choosing to Stay: Alternate Migration Decisions of Ghanaian Youth

Authors Mary Setrana
Year 2021
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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3 Journal Article

Context-Based Qualitative Research and Multi-sited Migration Studies in Europe

Authors Russell King
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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4 Book Chapter

Introduction

Authors Zana Vathi
Book Title Migrating and Settling in a Mobile World
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5 Book Chapter

Ukrainian Migration to Poland: A “Local” Mobility?

Authors Marta Kindler, Zuzanna Brunarska, Monika Szulecka, ...
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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6 Book Chapter

Mobility: A Practice or a Capital?

Authors Joëlle Moret
Book Title European Somalis' Post-Migration Movements
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7 Book Chapter

Regulating Movement of the Very Mobile: Selected Legal and Policy Aspects of Ukrainian Migration to EU Countries

Authors Monika Szulecka
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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8 Book Chapter

Conclusion

Authors Joëlle Moret
Book Title European Somalis' Post-Migration Movements
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9 Book Chapter

Introduction: Preparing the Way for Qualitative Research in Migration Studies

Authors Evren Yalaz, Ricard Zapata-Barrero
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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10 Book Chapter

Back to the South: Social and Political Aspects of Latin American Migration to Southern Europe

Authors Joao Peixoto
Year 2012
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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11 Journal Article

Reading Too Much and Too Little into the Matter? Latent Limits and Potentials of EU Freedom of Movement

Authors Julija Sardelić
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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12 Book Chapter

Research on Ukrainian Migration to Spain: Moving Beyond the Exploratory Approach

Authors Renáta Hosnedlová, Mikołaj Stanek, Elisa Brey
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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13 Book Chapter

Sending Country Policies

Authors Eva Østergaard-Nielsen
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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14 Book Chapter

Political Protest in Asylum and Deportation. An Introduction

Authors Sieglinde Rosenberger
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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15 Book Chapter

Poland’s Perspective on the Intra-European Movement of Poles. Implications and Governance Responses

Authors Marta Kindler
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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16 Book Chapter

Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility

Authors Agnieszka WEINAR
Year 2017
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17 Book

Introduction

Authors Julia Dahlvik
Book Title Inside Asylum Bureaucracy: Organizing Refugee Status Determination in Austria
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18 Book Chapter

Unpacking cosmopolitanism for the social sciences: a research agenda

Authors Ulrich Beck, Natan Sznaider
Year 2010
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 40
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19 Journal Article

Conclusions and Reflection

Authors Peter Scholten, Mark van Ostaijen
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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20 Book Chapter

Global Mobility Corridors for the Ultra-Rich. The Neoliberal Transformation of Citizenship

Authors Roxana Barbulescu
Book Title Debating transformations of national citizenship
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21 Book Chapter

Migration of Ukrainian Nationals to Portugal: The Visibility of a New Migration Landscape

Authors Sónia Pereira, Maria Lucinda Fonseca
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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22 Book Chapter

Social remittances and intra-EU mobility: non-financial transfers between UK and Poland

Authors Izabela Grabowska, Michal P. Garapich
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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23 Journal Article

Consequences of Intra-European Movement for CEE Migrants in European Urban Regions

Authors Ursula Reeger
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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24 Book Chapter

Return Imaginaries and Political Climate: Comparing Thinking About Return Mobilities Among Pakistani Origin Migrants and Descendants in Norway and the UK

Authors Marta Bolognani, Marta Bivand Erdal
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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25 Journal Article

Who Is an Immigrant and Who Requires Integration? Categorizing in European Policies

Authors Marleen van der Haar, Liza Mügge
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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26 Book Chapter

Qualitative Migration Research: Viable Goals, Open-Ended Questions, and Multidimensional Answers

Authors Ewa Morawska
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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27 Book Chapter

Protest Against the Reception of Asylum Seekers in Austria

Authors Sieglinde Rosenberger, Miriam Haselbacher
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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28 Book Chapter

Migration potential of college graduates from rural areas

Authors Piotr Cymanow, Anna Florek-Paszkowska
Year 2014
Journal Name Ekonomia i Prawo
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29 Journal Article

The Interview in Migration Studies: A Step towards a Dialogue and Knowledge Co-production?

Authors Violetta Zentai, Olena Fedyuk
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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30 Book Chapter

The Fall of 1200BC: The role of migration and conflict in social crises at end of the Bronze Age in South-eastern Europe

Description
This project explores changes in migration and conflict at the end of the Bronze Age (ca.1300-1000 BC) and their relevance for understanding the collapse of Europe’s first urban civilisation in the Aegean and proto-urban groups of the Balkans. The objective is to uncover the human face of this turning point in European prehistory by directly tracing the movement of people and the spread of new social practices across cultural boundaries. Hotly debated ancient tales of migrations are tested for the first time using recent advances in genetic and isotopic methods that can measure human mobility. Combined with mortuary research, this will precisely define relations between personal mobility and status, gender, identity and health to explore social scenarios in which people moved between groups. To better understand the context of mobility, the project also evaluates social networks through which cultural traditions moved within and between distinct societies. For this purpose, regionally particular ways for making and using objects are analysed to explore how practices were exchanged and how types of objects shaped, and were shaped by, their new contexts of use. Metalwork is chosen for this research because new forms came to be widely shared across the region during the crisis, and we can employ a novel suite of analytic methods that explore how this material exposes wider social changes. As personal and cultural mobility took place in social landscapes, the changing strategies for controlling access and mobility in settlement organisation are next explored. The character and causes of conflicts arising through these diverse venues for interaction are identified and we assess if they were catalysts for, or consequences of, unstable social systems. THE FALL uses new primary research to test how this interplay between local developments, cultural transmissions and movement of people shaped the processes and events leading to the collapse of these early complex societies.
Year 2018
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31 Project

Intergenerational Transmission of Ethnic Identity, Integration and Transnational Ties

Authors Zana Vathi
Book Title Migrating and Settling in a Mobile World
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32 Book Chapter

Migration destinations in the urban hierarchy in China: Evidence from Jiangsu

Authors Pu Hao, Shuangshuang Tang
Year 2018
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 8
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33 Journal Article

Temporary Migration Programmes: the Cause or Antidote of Migrant Worker Exploitation in UK Agriculture

Authors Erica Consterdine, Sahizer Samuk
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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34 Journal Article

Migration of Ukrainians to the European Union: Background and Key Issues

Authors Marta Kindler, Olena Fedyuk
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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35 Book Chapter

Social Remittances and the Impact of Temporary Migration on an EU Sending Country: The Case of Poland

Authors Izabela Grabowska, Godfried Engbersen
Year 2016
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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36 Journal Article

Migration, Motherhood, Marriage: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of North American Immigrant Mothers in Israel

Authors Laura I. Sigad, Rivka A. Eisikovits
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration
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37 Journal Article

Migration, Motherhood, Marriage: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of North American Immigrant Mothers in Israel

Authors Laura I. Sigad, Rivka A. Eisikovits
Year 2009
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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38 Journal Article

The Concept of Integration as an Analytical Tool and as a Policy Concept

Authors Blanca Garcés-Mascareñas, Rinus Penninx
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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39 Book Chapter

What Money Can’t Buy: Face-to-Face Cooperation and Local Democratic Life

Authors Paulina Ochoa Espejo
Book Title Debating transformations of national citizenship
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40 Book Chapter

Differences in Subjective Well-being Between Older Migrants and Natives in Europe

Authors Gregor Sand, Stefan Gruber
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
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41 Journal Article

National Immigration and Integration Policies in Europe Since 1973

Authors María Bruquetas-Callejo, Jeroen Doomernik
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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42 Book Chapter

Sexual politics, torture, and secular time

Authors Judith Butler
Year 2008
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 208
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43 Journal Article

Mixed Parentage: Negotiating Identity in Denmark

Authors Rashmi Singla, Helene Bang Appel
Book Title Contested Childhoods: Growing up in Migrancy
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44 Book Chapter

Digitization without digital evidence: Technology and Sweden’s asylum system

Authors Nicholas R Micinski, Will Jones
Year 2021
Journal Name Journal of Refugee Studies
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46 Journal Article

Individual versus Household Migration Decision Rules: Gender and Marital Status Differences in Intentions to Migrate in South Africa

Authors Bina Gubhaju, Gordon F. De Jong
Year 2009
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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47 Journal Article

The Role of Social Capital in Labour-Related Migrations: the Polish Example

Authors Justyna Lukaszewska-Bezulska
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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48 Journal Article

The Kindness of Strangers: Exploring Interdependencies and Shared Mobilities of Elderly People in Rural Japan

Authors Fuyo (Jenny) Yamamoto, Junyi Zhang
Year 2017
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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49 Journal Article

Social mobility and social capital in contemporary Britain

Authors Yaojun Li, Mike Savage, Alan Warde
Year 2008
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 66
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50 Journal Article

Epistemological Issues in Qualitative Migration Research: Self-Reflexivity, Objectivity and Subjectivity

Authors Theodoros Iosifides
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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51 Book Chapter

Where, What and Whom to Study? Principles, Guidelines and Empirical Examples of Case Selection and Sampling in Migration Research

Authors Karolina Barglowski
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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52 Book Chapter

The nation-family: Intimate encounters and genealogical perversion in Armenia

Authors TAMAR SHIRINIAN
Year 2018
Journal Name American Ethnologist
Citations (WoS) 2
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53 Journal Article

Freedom of Movement Needs to Be Defended as the Core of EU Citizenship

Authors Floris De Witte
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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54 Book Chapter

When “Inclusion” Means “Exclusion”: Discourses on the Eviction and Repatriations of Roma Migrants, at National and European Union Level

Authors Dragos Ciulinaru
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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55 Journal Article

Professional Nigerian Women, Household Economy, and Immigration Decisions

Authors Rachel R. Reynolds
Year 2006
Journal Name International Migration
Citations (WoS) 10
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56 Journal Article

‘For us, Migration is Ordinary’: Post-1989 Labour Migration from Bulgaria to Turkey

Authors Ayse Parla
Book Title Migration in the Southern Balkans
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57 Book Chapter

Reciprocal youth mobilities between Italy and Spain: A question of elective affinities

Authors P Pumares, Beatriz Gonzalez-Martin, Armando Montanari, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 2
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58 Journal Article

Central Europe as a space of transnational migration

Authors Max Haller, Roland Verwiebe
Year 2016
Journal Name Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie
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59 Journal Article

Ethnic-Minority Climbers. Winning the Golden Calf

Authors Marieke Slootman
Book Title Ethnic Identity, Social Mobility and the Role of Soulmates
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60 Book Chapter

Power and Counter Power in Europe. The Transnational Structuring of Social Spaces and Social Fields

Authors Susanne Pernicka, Christian Lahusen
Year 2018
Journal Name Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie
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61 Journal Article

Research-Policy Dialogues on Migrant Integration in Europe: A Conceptual Framework and Key Questions

Authors Han Entzinger, Peter Scholten, Rinus Penninx
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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63 Book Chapter

Practical Implications: How to Deal with Structural Dilemmas?

Authors Julia Dahlvik
Book Title Inside Asylum Bureaucracy: Organizing Refugee Status Determination in Austria
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64 Book Chapter

Theorizing the Ukrainian Case: Pushing the Boundaries of Migration Studies Through a Europe–US Comparison

Authors Cinzia D. Solari
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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65 Book Chapter

Cultures of Knowledge Use in Policymaking: The Functions of Research in German and UK Immigration Policy

Authors Christina Boswell
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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66 Book Chapter

The Multi-Level Governance of Intra EU Movement

Authors Jonas Hinnfors, Gregg Bucken-Knapp, Andrea Spehar, ...
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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68 Book Chapter

Structural Emigration: The Revival of Portuguese Outflows

Authors Pedro Góis, José Carlos Marques
Book Title South-North Migration of EU Citizens in Times of Crisis
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69 Book Chapter

The New European Migration Laboratory: East Europeans in West European Cities

Authors Adrian Favell
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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70 Book Chapter

Old Habits Die Hard? Lingering Son Preference in an Era of Normalizing Sex Ratios at Birth in South Korea

Authors Sam Hyun Yoo, Sarah R. Hayford, Victor Agadjanian
Year 2017
Journal Name Population Research and Policy Review
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71 Journal Article

Conclusions: Coming to Terms with Superdiversity?

Authors Peter Scholten, Maurice Crul, Paul van de Laar
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72 Book Chapter

The Intercultural Communication as a Tool of Multilingual Personality Formation in Modern Educational Space of Ukraine

Authors Viktoria Zagorodnova, Natalia Panova, Irina Cherezova, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name TARIH KULTUR VE SANAT ARASTIRMALARI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF HISTORY CULTURE AND ART RESEARCH
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73 Journal Article

Migrasjon, foreldreskap og sosial kontroll

Authors Jon Horgen Friberg, Mathilde Bjørnset
Description
The topic of this report is parenting and social control, with a particular focus on immigrant families from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka. The empirical analyses fall into three parts: A quantitative analysis of attitudes to gender roles, sexuality and relationships in immigrant families and the scope of parental restrictions, as well as analyses of the driving forces and development of social control. We ask questions about the attitudes that are found in various groups with regard to issues of gender roles and sexuality among adolescents. Furthermore, we identify those who are most at risk of being subject to strict parental restrictions, and what kinds of consequences these may entail for the life of young people. A qualitative analysis of the parents’ subjective concerns with regard to raising children and adolescents in Norway, based on individual and group interviews with parents. Here, we will focus on the parents’ perspectives and their experiences of and grounds for the way in which they exercise social control. A qualitative analysis of complexity and social change in family relationships in a migration context, based on interviews with parents, adolescents and young adults, as well as professionals in the assistance services. Here, we focus on the experiences of the young people and relationships within families, with a special emphasis on mechanisms of social change. Quantitative analyses of attitudes and social control Based on the adolescents’ assessments of their parents’ attitudes, we find that the parental generation from countries such as Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka, as well as other immigrant groups from the global South, are far more conservative in issues concerning pre-marital sex, homosexuality and letting adolescents in upper secondary school age have boy-/girlfriends, when compared to the population in general. Attitudes to gender roles and sexuality are closely linked to religion—both the degree of religiosity and affiliation with specific religious communities have an effect. Muslim immigrants appear to be the most conservative, but other religious groups are also far more conservative in such issues than the general population. We also find major variations in attitudes between different groups among adolescents, but the young people tend to see themselves as considerably more liberal than their parents. A substantial minority within some immigrant groups reports what may be referred to as severe parental restrictions on their social life. For example, 29 per cent of all girls from a Pakistani background in the first year of upper secondary school in Oslo and Akershus report that it is very or fairly true that their parents object to them ‘being in the company of persons of the opposite gender in their leisure time with no adults present’. The degree of parental control is directly linked to the parents’ cultural orientation and degree of religious conviction. The more concerned the parents are to preserve the culture of their country of origin, the stronger the likelihood that the adolescents will be exposed to strict parental control. There is also a certain correlation with the parents’ socioeconomic status, but this effect is far weaker. Adolescents who receive good grades in school, however, tend to report fewer parental restrictions than peers with poorer school performance. Boys and girls tend to experience somewhat different forms of social control. While boys in fact more often report restrictions on being with friends, girls more frequently report that their parents object to them being with someone of the opposite gender without adult supervision. Among Muslims, girls report more parental restrictions than boys, whereas the opposite is the case in some other groups. We may assume that some boys have greater expectations regarding their own freedom and thus have a lower threshold for reporting parental restrictions. In addition, the qualitative interviews indicate that even though boys and girls may be subject to equally strict rules, violations made by girls are seen as far more serious. Adolescents who are born in Norway to immigrant parents are less exposed to parental restrictions than those who have immigrated themselves, and the degree of parental restrictions diminishes markedly in pace with increased length of residence in the family. This reduction in parental restrictions appears to also occur in families that retain a conservative attitude to adolescent gender roles and sexuality. The analyses indicate that parental restrictions have considerable consequences for the lives of young people. Reports of parental restrictions are associated with lower rates of participation in organised leisure activities and a higher likelihood of reporting mental afflictions and low self-esteem. Some young people appear to lead what may be termed ‘double lives’ in conflict with their parents’ wishes. For example, a considerable proportion of minority youths have a boy-/girlfriend, even though they believe that their parents would strongly disapprove of this. Parental perspectives on raising adolescents in a foreign culture In the second section of the empirical analyses we have attempted to give a voice to the generation of parents among immigrants from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka and their concerns linked to being a parent in Norway. We place special emphasis on older and relatively conservative parents, since they clearly articulate topics that to a greater or lesser extent are of concern for others as well. Many of the parents whom we interviewed report missing a larger social collective from which to seek support in raising children, and often feeling alone with the responsibility for the children. In their countries of origin, raising children tends to be more of a communal responsibility that involves the extended family, relatives and the local community, and where key norms are shared in all the different arenas that the children frequent. The loss of this community, the feeling of dissolution of family bonds and of being alone when facing a strange and foreign world were among the recurring topics in interviews with the parents. Some also express frustration over the fact that the children, in their opinion, fail to uphold the community norms that prevailed in their own youth. Individualism—often interpreted as egotism—and liberal attitudes to substance use and sexuality are perceived as especially threatening aspects of Norwegian society. In addition, some parents see that their traditional instruments for maintaining discipline and control, including corporal punishment, shared religious norms and support from the extended family, are unavailable here. Some therefore feel that they are unable to adequately exercise parental and social control. Some are also uncertain of what is considered acceptable in terms of setting boundaries for children in Norwegian society. Some parents feel that their religion, identity and culture are under pressure from the wider society. To some extent, this is a reflection of uncertainty and fear in the encounter with the unknown. However, this perception also reflects a real conflict between different ways of regulating social life: Should adolescents be regarded as citizens with independent rights and autonomy, or are their rights and duties primarily derived from their membership in a family collective with sovereign authority over its members? This conflict between a collectivist and religious family organisation on the one hand and secular-state individualism on the other is partly expressed in the form of an ambivalent relationship toward schools. Immigrant parents tend to have strongly positive attitudes to school and education, but in matters related to swimming lessons for boys and girls, summer camps, showering after PE classes etc. some parents feel that their wishes are being ignored. The state/family conflict emerges with particular clarity in the form of families’ fear of the child protection service, which some parents see as a constant threat and an invasion of the family’s sovereignty. The maintenance of traditional marriage institutions is perceived by many as the key to perpetuating family structure, faith and identity, and concern for the children’s future marriage is a main factor in the execution of social control. In the background lurks the fear of being sent to a nursing home, which for some is a symbol of the consequences should they fail to preserve traditional family structures. For some parents, there is thus a lot at stake in their parenting practices. There are major individual variations between different families and parents in all three groups with regard to the strength of these concerns. However, there are also systematic differences between the groups that are worth noting. The first difference concerns the ‘glue’ in the social networks that binds them together. Although the Pakistani, Somali and Tamil informants were all concerned with family dissolution as a result of migration, there were considerable differences with regard to their concrete social organisation. The Somali group stood out at one end of the scale, by having largely fragmented social networks and many families with dissolved family structures. As many as 6 out of 10 adolescents with a Somali background reported that they did not live with both parents together. The Tamil group with a background from Sri Lanka stood out at the other end, by having largely succeeded in reconstructing closely knit social networks that provide considerable support for individual families, organised within the framework of the Tamil diaspora movement. The second difference pertains to the perception of identity conflict. Some of the parents in both the Somali and Pakistani groups felt that, to some extent, their wish to perpetuate their cultural and religious identity conflicted with the intentions of the Norwegian state regarding their children. The Tamils were also concerned with preserving their own identity, but for them, this was a matter of language, rather than religion, and they far less frequently stated that this was antagonistic to their integration in the wider society. Inter-generational relations and social change The interviews with adolescents and young adults underscore the social complexity in relationships characterised by strong social control. Adolescents and parents are both part of networks and relationships in which many of the participants experience mutually incompatible demands and expectations—not only to their own lifestyle, but also in terms of how they should relate to that of others. It is thus not always so easy to identify those who exercise social control and those who are being controlled, since there are many—including parents, siblings and other relatives—who may feel that they are caught ‘between a rock and a hard place’, squeezed between the expectations of others. The way in which adolescents perceive being subject to strong social control will largely depend on their own attitudes and adaptations. For example, internalising the family’s expectations is one way to ensure avoidance of conflicts while being able to perceive autonomy and independence in daily life. Others choose to embrace a religious identity as a way to distance themselves from the family’s demands, while committing to a set of life rules that ensure acceptance and legitimacy. Some enter into conflict, in the form of breaking out and settling scores or fighting small everyday battles. Many live so-called ‘double lives’, shifting between varying expectations and demands in different arenas. However, one effect of such ‘double lives’ is that relationships become potentially vulnerable—the consequences are felt only when something ‘goes wrong’. Inter-generational conflicts in relationships characterised by strong social control cannot be understood only as value conflicts; they also take the form of negotiations, where various resources can be brought into the bargain. For many young people, however, conflicts of interest between different generations appear as internalised value conflicts, such as the parents’ concern regarding who will take care of them in their old age. We identify a number of social mechanisms that, over time, will bring about change in the direction of more liberal parenting practices. These are partly changes that follow from learning and adaptation, and partly changes that follow from conflicts. Over time, many families feel that their points of reference gradually change and the idealised images of the perfect family have a tendency to pale. In some communities, their notion of ‘scandal’ erodes, and the fear of what others might say loses some of its hold as time passes. Furthermore, many parents discover through trial and error that traditional authoritarian parenting styles function poorly in Norway. Many report that they have been ‘forced’ to change their methods in seeking to transfer their values to the children. In addition, we can see that the institutional frameworks in Norwegian society—which provide women and children with far better legal protection and access to resources—help give small and large internal family conflicts a different outcome than what would have been seen in the countries of origin. Increasing levels of education, especially among girls in the second generation, also help change the balance of power and the bargaining situation in ways that gradually change the rules of the game in the families. Religion plays an ambiguous role in these processes of change. Religion is the source of demands and restrictions related to gender segregation and chastity, and religious arguments lend weight and legitimacy to the execution of social control, with a conservative effect. At the same time, we can see that changes in family practices are accompanied by a more liberal and individualist interpretation of religion in the younger generation. For some, religiously based arguments may even provide a weighty case for liberation from the more culturally based expectations from the parents’ generation. The report is concluded with some reflections around the implications for policy-oriented work in this area.
Year 2019
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74 Report

Homo Sovieticus Revisited - Anti-Institutionalism, Alcohol and Resistance Among Polish Homeless Men in London

Authors Michal P. Garapich
Year 2014
Journal Name International Migration
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75 Journal Article

What we learned from the Dust Bowl: lessons in science, policy, and adaptation

Authors Robert A. McLeman, Juliette Dupre, Konrad Gajewski, ...
Year 2014
Journal Name Population and Environment
Citations (WoS) 43
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76 Journal Article

Report on Egyptian Women Migration

Authors Heba NASSAR
Description
To understand female migration and its interrelation with socio-economic development, a consideration of the selectivity of female migrants, their characteristics and differences with respect to female non-migrants as well as male migrants together with an analysis of the forces leading to such selectivity is an important first step. The general structural determinants of female migration have been categorized as: (i) those related to the economic development context and stemming mostly from government policies that influenced gender-based economic opportunities and constraints in areas of origin and destination; (ii) those determinants related to institutional factors that maintained gender inequalities; (iii) those determinants arising from the socio-cultural system of gender roles and relations operating in accordance with prevalent norms, values and expectations. The promotion of equal employment opportunities for men and women is needed: it is important to prevent the perpetuation of segmented labor markets. At the household level, migration might be treated as part of a household strategy of risk diversification wherein a member of the household is encouraged or helped to migrate so as to send back remittances. Finally, it should be noted that the outcome of migration for women varies considerably according to the socio-cultural and family contexts in which migration takes place.. / Pour comprendre le phénomène de la migration féminine et ses liens avec le développement socio-économique, il convient d’étudier, dans un premier temps, la sélectivité des migrantes, leurs caractéristiques et différences par rapport aux femmes non-migrantes et aux migrants de sexe masculin, ainsi que d’analyser les forces conduisant à une telle sélectivité. Les déterminants structurels généraux de la migration féminine ont été classés comme suit : 1) déterminants liés au contexte du développement économique et provenant principalement de politiques gouvernementales ayant influencé les opportunités économiques et les contraintes dans les zones d'origine et de destination dans une perspective de genre; 2) déterminants liés à des facteurs institutionnels maintenant les inégalités entre les sexes; 3) déterminants découlant du système socio-culturel des rôles et des relations entre les sexes et s’appuyant sur les normes et valeurs courantes. La promotion de l'égalité des chances entre les hommes et les femmes est nécessaire. Il est, de fait, important d'empêcher la perpétuation des marchés du travail segmentés. Au niveau des ménages, la migration peut également être considérée comme partie prenante d'une stratégie de diversification des risques des ménages au sein desquels un membre est encouragé à migrer afin de bénéficier des envois de fonds. Enfin, il convient de noter que le résultat de la migration pour les femmes varie considérablement selon les contextes socio-culturels et familiaux dans lesquels cette migration a eu lieu.
Year 2011
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77 Report

Of alcohol and men – survival, masculinities and anti-institutionalism of Polish homeless men in a global city

Year 2011
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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78 Journal Article

Finding a Place for Islam in Europe: Cultural Interactions between Muslim immigrants and Receiving Societies

Description
The central research question of this project is: how have different traditions of national identity, citizenship, and church-state relations affected European immigration countries’ incorporation of Islam, and what are the consequences of these approaches for patterns of cultural distance and interaction between Muslim immigrants and their descendants, and the receiving society? We answer this question by focusing on three specific research questions: (1) What are the differences between European immigration countries in how they deal with cultural and religious differences of immigrant groups in general, and of Muslims in particular? This question has two aspects. First, the more formal aspect of legislation and jurisprudence, which we will address by way of gathering a systematic set of cross-national indicators using secondary sources. Secondly, cultural relations are also affected importantly by how conceptions of national identity, citizenship, church-state relations, and the position of Islam in relation to these, are framed and contested in the public sphere. (2) To what extent do we find differences across immigration countries in cultural distance and patterns of interaction between various Muslim immigrant groups and the receiving society population? On the one hand, we will focus here on attitudes, norms, and values. On the other hand, we will look at cultural and religious resources and practices. (3) To what extent can cross-national differences in cultural distance and patterns of interethnic and interreligious interaction be explained by the different approaches that immigration countries have followed towards the management of cultural difference in general, and Islam in particular?
Year 2009
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79 Project

Crime, policing and social order: on the expressive nature of public confidence in policing

Authors Jonathan Jackson, Ben Bradford
Year 2009
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
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80 Journal Article

Research-Policy Dialogues in the United Kingdom

Authors Christina Boswell, Alistair Hunter
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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82 Book Chapter

Discourse and Migration

Authors Teun A. van Dijk
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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83 Book Chapter

Identity Development Among Youth of Vietnamese Descent in the Czech Republic

Authors Eva Janská, Andrea Svobodová
Book Title Contested Childhoods: Growing up in Migrancy
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84 Book Chapter

The Human Individual vs. the Faceless Case

Authors Julia Dahlvik
Book Title Inside Asylum Bureaucracy: Organizing Refugee Status Determination in Austria
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85 Book Chapter

EU Citizenship, Free Movement and Emancipation: A Rejoinder

Authors Floris De Witte
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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87 Book Chapter

Categorising What We Study and What We Analyse, and the Exercise of Interpretation

Authors Dirk Jacobs
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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88 Book Chapter

Determinants of Life Satisfaction of Economic Migrants Coming from Developing Countries to Countries with Very High Human Development: a Systematic Review

Authors Virginia Paloma, Isabel Benitez, Marta Escobar-Ballesta, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name APPLIED RESEARCH IN QUALITY OF LIFE
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89 Journal Article

Protests Revisited: Political Configurations, Political Culture and Protest Impact

Authors Helen Schwenken, Gianni D’Amato
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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90 Book Chapter

Gender and Migration: West Indians in Comparative Perspective

Authors Nancy Foner
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration
Citations (WoS) 19
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91 Journal Article

Our favourite melodies: musical consumption and teenage lifestyles

Authors Julian Tanner, Mark Asbridge, Scot Wortley
Year 2008
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 32
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92 Journal Article

Bargaining Power or Specialization? Determinants of Household Decision Making in Chinese Rural Migrant Families

Authors Zicheng Wang, Yun Lou, Yi Zhou
Year 2020
Journal Name SAGE OPEN
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93 Journal Article

Exploring barriers to consistent condom use among sub-Saharan African young immigrants in Switzerland

Authors Francesca Poglia Mileti, Brikela Sulstarova, Laura Mellini, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name AIDS CARE-PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIO-MEDICAL ASPECTS OF AIDS/HIV
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94 Journal Article

Where’s populism? Online media and the diffusion of populist discourses and styles in Portugal

Authors Susana Salgado
Year 2019
Journal Name European Political Science
Citations (WoS) 7
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95 Journal Article

Consequences of International Migration on the Size and Composition of Religious Groups in Austria

Authors Michaela Potančoková, Anne Goujon, Sandra Jurasszovich
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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96 Journal Article

Ethical and cultural striving: Lived experiences of minority nurses in dementia care

Authors Veslemoy Egede-Nissen, Gerd Sylvi Sellevold, Rita Jakobsen, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name NURSING ETHICS
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97 Journal Article

Youth as contested sites of culture: The intergenerational acculturation gap amongst new migrant communities- Parental and young adult perspectives

Authors Andre M. N. Renzaho, Nichole Georgeou, Nidhi Dhingra
Year 2017
Journal Name PLoS ONE
Citations (WoS) 4
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98 Journal Article

Sustaining the welfare and working life model in a diversified society

Principal investigator Oddbjørn Raaum (Principal Investigator)
Description
The project outlines an ambitious research agenda, addressing challenges to sustaining the welfare and working life model in an era of increasing immigration and ethnic diversity. The project is comprehensive, covering the essential elements of sustaining the welfare state in the diversified society: The economic integration of immigrants; the impacts of exposure to ethnic diversity; and the role of ancestry culture for integration across generations. The project is innovative. We combine state-of-the art econometric methods and analyses of data from large administrative registers, field and laboratory experiments, and surveys. The register data cover longitudinal records for the full population over 25 years, including residence, education, work, and welfare, augmented with novel microdata on political participation. We study effects of exposure on trust in field experiments coordinated with the army and in analyses of election outcomes. We examine the roles of ancestry culture and gender norms in incentivized laboratory experiments, survey data, and epidemiological analyses that combine register data for the second generation and cultural indicators from the parental ancestry country. The project has strong policy relevance. It investigates directly the effects of programs targeted at newly arrived refugees and income requirements for family reunification on long-term labor market integration, as well as political participation in the immigrant population. For each program, we have identified explicit strategies for causal analysis. The project is multidisciplinary, bringing together a team of leading Norwegian researchers and distinguished international scholars from the fields of Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology.
Year 2017
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99 Project

Between National Models and Multi-Level Decoupling: The Pursuit of Multi-Level Governance in Dutch and UK Policies Towards Migrant Incorporation

Authors Peter Scholten
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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100 Journal Article
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