Showing page of 10562 results, sorted by

Different Patterns of Labor Market Integration by Migration Motivation in Europe: The Role of Host Country Human Capital

Authors Wouter Zwysen
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 1
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
1 Journal Article

Gender inequalities in employment and wage-earning among internal labour migrants in Chinese cities

Authors Min Qin, Sabu S. Padmadas, Jane Falkingham, ...
Year 2016
Journal Name Demographic Research
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
2 Journal Article

Migrants, Ethnic Minorities and the Labour Market

Authors Andrea Rea, John Wrench, Nouria Ouali
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
3 Book

Socio-Cultural Determinants of Labour-Market Integration of Immigrants

Principal investigator Ruud Koopmans (Principal Investigator), Jutta Höhne (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives Economic participation of migrants has been a major problem in many European countries for the last decades. There is overwhelming statistical evidence for the problematic labour market status of migrants, but data also show that not all migrant groups are affected to the same extent. Previous studies have revealed that differences in socio-economic integration are strongly related to ethnic origin. However, this research does not allow us to firmly establish to what extent cultural and religious factors are responsible for the differential socio-economic position of ethnic groups. Therefore, we investigate the effects of host-country orientation and cultural difference of migrants on their socio-economic integration in Germany, analysing unemployment and employment durations of male and female migrants, as well as transitions from domestic work to employment for female migrants from Turkey, Former Yugoslavia, Greece, Spain and Italy. Given the large gap in unemployment and employment rates not only between natives and migrants, but also between groups of migrants, we look at several economic, human capital and cultural factors in order to test whether migrant-specific characteristics can help to explain ethnic group differences in labour market outcomes. The migrant-specific cultural variables we investigate include host-country language proficiency, interethnic contacts, host-country media consumption, and religiosity. In the case of married female migrants, the analysis moreover takes relevant characteristics of their husbands into account, which have not received attention in earlier studies. Research design and methodology The German Socio-Economic Panel provides reliable longitudinal data, allowing us to conduct analyses over a period of nearly 20 years (1988-2006). We use duration data to analyse the hazard of labour market status transitions by estimating Cox regression models with a random frailty term to account for unobserved heterogeneity. Individual longitudinal data on employment trajectories of migrants have been combined with labour market context data and relevant human capital and cultural factors. A longitudinal approach is crucial for addressing this research question, since the relationship between socio-cultural factors such as host-country language proficiency and interethnic contacts and labour market integration is likely to be recursive. Our samples cover not only persons born outside Germany, but also their 2nd generation offspring. Findings The results indicate that although labour market transitions of migrants strongly depend on the labour market context, host-country orientation and religiosity also have a certain impact on the labour market integration of individual migrants, especially on transitions into employment of male migrants and married migrant housewives. However, while for most of our cultural variables we find significant effects on the individual level, these factors do not help to clarify the differences among the different migrant groups, which persist at a similar level even after controlling for labour market, general human capital, as well as cultural variables."
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
4 Project

Temporary Migration Programmes: the Cause or Antidote of Migrant Worker Exploitation in UK Agriculture

Authors Erica Consterdine, Sahizer Samuk
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
5 Journal Article

Consequences of Intra-European Movement for CEE Migrants in European Urban Regions

Authors Ursula Reeger
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
6 Book Chapter

Why migrants earn less: in search of the factors producing the ethno-migrant pay gap in a Dutch public organization

Authors Hans Siebers, Jilles van Gastel
Year 2015
Journal Name Work, Employment and Society
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
7 Journal Article

The Labor Contract Law and the economic integration of rural migrants in urban China

Authors Yuling Wu, Hong Xiao
Year 2020
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
8 Journal Article

Social Stigma, Social Capital Reconstruction, and Rural Migrants in Urban China: A Population Health Perspective

Authors Xinguang Chen, Danhua Lin, Xiaoyi Fang, ...
Year 2011
Journal Name HUMAN ORGANIZATION
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
9 Journal Article

Diaspora Dialogues

Year 2007
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
10 Book

The influence of hukou and college education in China’s labour market

Authors Yang Xiao, Yanjie Bian
Year 2018
Journal Name Urban Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
11 Journal Article

Skills and Integration of Migrants, Refugees and Asylum Applicants in European Labour Markets

Description
Despite the polarization in public and policy debates generated by the post-2014 fluxes of refugees, asylum applicants and migrants, European countries need to work out an evidence-based way to deal with migration and asylum rather than a prejudice-based one. The proposed project, SIRIUS, builds on a multi-dimensional conceptual framework in which host country or political-institutional, societal and individual-related conditions function either as enablers or as barriers to migrants’, refugees’ and asylum seekers’ integration via the labour market. SIRIUS has three main objectives: A descriptive objective: To provide systematic evidence on post-2014 migrants, refugees and asylum applicants especially women and young people and their potential for labour market employment and, more broadly, social integration. An explanatory objective: To advance knowledge on the complexity of labour market integration for post-2014 migrants, refugees and asylum applicants, and to explore their integration potential by looking into their spatial distribution (in relation to the distribution of labour demand across the labour market), while taking into account labour market characteristics and needs in different country and socio-economic contexts. A prescriptive objective: To advance a theoretical framework for an inclusive integration agenda, outlining an optimal mix of policy pathways for labour market integration including concrete steps that Member States and other European countries along with the EU can take to ensure that migrant-integration policies and the broader system of workforce-development, training, and employment programmes support new arrivals’ access to decent work opportunities and working conditions. SIRIUS has a mixed methods approach and innovative dissemination plan involving online priority action networks, film essays, festival, job fair and an applied game along with scientific and policy dialogue workshops and conferences.
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
12 Project

Labour market and social integration of Eastern European migrants in Scotland and Portugal

Authors Heather Dickey, Stephen Drinkwater, Sergei Shubin
Year 2018
Journal Name Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
13 Journal Article

Social Capital and Its Effect on Labour Market (Mis)match: Migrants’ Overqualification in Germany

Authors Nancy Kracke, Christina Klug
Year 2021
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
14 Journal Article

The Economic Contribution of Humanitarian Settlers in Australia

Authors G Hugo
Year 2014
Journal Name International Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
15 Journal Article

Employment Rights for Migrant Workers in Ireland: Towards A Human Rights Framework

Authors Deirdre Toomey
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
16 Journal Article

A distributional analysis of wage discrimination against migrant workers in China’s urban labour market

Authors Haining Wang, Zhiming Cheng, Fei Guo
Year 2015
Journal Name Urban Studies
Citations (WoS) 11
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
17 Journal Article

Discrimination in Migrant Workers' Welfare Entitlements and Benefits in Urban Labour Market: Findings from a Four-City Study in China

Authors Haining Wang, Zhiming Cheng, F Guo
Year 2015
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 13
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
18 Journal Article

Labor Exploitation and Health Inequities Among Market Migrants: A Political Economy Perspective

Authors Iffath Unissa Syed
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
19 Journal Article

Double Jeopardy: How Refugees Fare in One European Labor Market

Authors Dries Lens, Ive Marx, Sunčica Vujić
Year 2019
Journal Name IZA Journal of Development and Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
20 Journal Article

Training, skill-upgrading and settlement intention of migrants: Evidence from China

Authors Qing Wang, Ting Ren, Ti Liu
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
21 Journal Article

Female Migrant Entrepreneurs in Vienna: Mobility and its Embeddedness

Authors Petra Dannecker, Alev Cakir
Year 2016
Journal Name Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
22 Journal Article

Changing sector? Social mobility among female migrants in care and cleaning sector in Spain and Sweden

Authors María Sánchez-Domínguez, Susanne Fahlén
Year 2018
Journal Name Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
23 Journal Article

Returning Migrant Characteristics and Labor Market Demand in Greece

Authors Elizabeth Mclean Petras, Maria Kousis
Year 1988
Journal Name International Migration Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
24 Journal Article

Shifts in Intergenerational Mobility of Indian Immigrant Entrepreneurs

Authors Meena Chavan, Lucy Taksa
Year 2017
Journal Name International Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
25 Journal Article

Managing transnational work in Sweden: The Meaning of Gendering, Racialisation and Citizenship in a Segmented Labour Market

Principal investigator Karin Krifors (REMESO Project Leader), Anders Neergaard (Scientifically Responsible)
Description
This project aims at investigating shifting migration regimes and how employment and labor differentiates categories of migrants in Sweden. Relations between employers and migrants become increasingly crucial for opportunities and restraints in migrant life situations in systems of managed migration. Employers also become engaged in global economic relations and at the same time negotiate the relations between the nation and the migrant workers.
Year 2011
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
26 Project

Agents of Socialization and Female Migrants’ Employment: The Influence of Mothers and the Country Context

Authors Magdalena Krieger
Year 2020
Journal Name European Sociological Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
27 Journal Article

Drivers and patterns of rural youth migration and its impact on food security and rural livelihoods in Tunisia

Authors Carolina Viviana ZUCCOTTI, Andrew GEDDES, Alessia BACCHI, ...
Description
The RuMiT (Rural Migration in Tunisia) research addresses the determinants of migration and mobility, the patterns and types of rural youth outmigration and the impact of rural youth migration on rural livelihoods and societies in origin regions in Tunisia. The research used a mixed-methods approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods, providing comparative insights into: international and internal migrants and non-migrants; pre- and post-2011 migrants; households with and without migrants. Main results show that migrants from rural areas are increasingly highly educated and leaving to pursue their studies abroad. This particularly applies to women, who also register a decrease in marriage-related migration. Migration proves to be rewarding for both internal and international migrants, in terms of occupational and social security outcomes. In particular, migrant women have higher labour market participation and employment rates than non-migrants. As a direct consequence of an emigration which is still male dominated, households with migrants are increasingly feminized, i.e. with a higher share of women, who are more likely to be active compared with women in nonmigrant households. Migrant households were also found to have higher access to social security. While incomes from remittances tend not to be invested in productive activities, evidence shows that one internal migrant out of four and one international migrant out of three has an economic activity in the areas of origin, which in most of the cases is connected with agricultural or animal production. The Rural Migration in Tunisia (RuMiT) research project was undertaken in the framework of the FAO project “Youth mobility, food security and rural poverty reduction: Fostering rural diversification through enhanced youth employment and better mobility” (GCP/INT/240/ITA) – in brief, the Rural Youth Migration (RYM) project – implemented in Tunisia and Ethiopia between 2015 and 2017, and funded by the Italian Development Cooperation.
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
28 Report

Measures to Support Early-Stage Migrant Entrepreneurs

Authors Giacomo Solano, Alexander Wolffhardt, Aldo Xhani
Description
Migrant entrepreneurship has received increasing attention from policy makers, stakeholders and scholars. In both the Action Plan for the integration of third country nationals and the 2020 Entrepreneurship Action Plan, the European Commission emphasises that entrepreneurship represents an alternative form of decent and sustainable employment for migrants. This also follows recent academic and non-academic studies on the topic (European Commission, 2016; Rath, Solano and Schutjens, 2019). There are at least four reasons why policies and measures should focus on supporting migrant entrepreneurs, especially in early stages of the business: • Self-employment represents a way towards empowerment. Although it cannot be taken for granted that self-employment provides migrants with a higher income in comparison to those who opted for a salaried employment (see Bradley, 2004), self-employment represents a way to tackle unemployment, and underemployment - professional downgrading and employment in poorly paid, dangerous and demanding jobs (Rath, Solano and Schutjens, 2019). Furthermore, through migrant entrepreneurship, migrants can improve their social status in the receiving society (Allen and Busse, 2016; Basu, 2001; Solano, 2015). • The impact of migrant entrepreneurship goes way beyond the benefits for the individual entrepreneur. In quantifiable terms, the number of firms, the employment creation, the volume in trade and sales are increasing, something that may benefit the economy in general (Desiderio, 2014). Migrant entrepreneurs also bring about qualitative economic and market changes that result in relatively new products and processes. They gravitate to particular neighborhoods or areas, thereby creating interesting places for leisure and consumption and revitalizing these areas (see, Aytar and Rath, 2012). • A relevant number of migrants starts a business. While many international migrants are economically active as wage workers (i.e., employees), a small but significant number has chosen or would like to start a business. About 13 per cent of all foreign-born migrants in OECD countries are selfemployed (OECD, 2010 and 2013). The same happens for the EU28 countries, in which around the 12% of foreign population is self-employed (Eurostat, 2017). In many countries the rate of self-employment among migrants is higher than the one of natives (Eurostat, 2017; OECD, 2010 and 2013). • Migrant-owned business are likely to fail and to be in low-profitable sectors. Despite self-employment and entrepreneurship represent a promising alternative option for migrants to access the labour market, they need to be adequately supported by policies and initiatives. In fact, migrant enterprises have higher failure rates than nativeowned ones and tend to concentrate in low-profitable sectors (e.g., petty trade) with no possibilities of growth (Desiderio and Mestres 2011; OECD, 2010; Rath and Schutjens, 2016). The difficulties that migrant entrepreneurs have in running the business is due to some specific obstacles that migrants – and, more in general, vulnerable groups -face when they want to start a business. The obstacles are well-known and there is an extensive literature on this (Desiderio, 2014; Rath and Swagerman, 2016): • they have difficulties in accessing credit, especially for financial institutions. As they often lack collaterals (e.g., they do not own a house), financial institutions are likely to deny credit to them. Consequently, migrant entrepreneurs normally receive small loans from relatives, friends and other migrants. This hampers the possibility of entering in sectors that requires a relevant starting capital, which are normally more profitable. • migrant entrepreneurs have difficulties to deal with the bureaucracy of the host country. They have difficulties in understanding all the administrative steps to start the business. • they (often) lack of familiarity with the (business) environment and the market where they start the business. Having only limited knowledge of the context of the destination country – with often information received from other migrants – tunnels them towards ethnic and/or not profitable markets. • a limited personal network, which is often composed of other migrants, does not help in dealing with bureaucracy or accessing information on potential unexplored market – as other migrants have often limited information as well. In conclusion, migrant entrepreneurship may represent an alternative way to access the labour market of the host | 2 country. However, migrant entrepreneurship often results in low-profitable highly-demanding micro businesses, which do not represent a decent form of employment. This is because of the barriers that migrants face when it comes to start a business. Migrant entrepreneurship needs to be supported to become an alternative form of decent employment. Policy makers and support providers (e.g. public employment services, NGOs, microcredit institutions) often face many obstacles in the design and implementation of support policies for migrant entrepreneurs. This handbook is addressed to policy makers in the field and support providers and aims at summarizing the main kinds of support that can be provided to migrant entrepreneurs and the factors for successful support measures. In doing this, we present some good practices.
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
30 Report

Job Market Perceptions of African Migrant Women in South Africa as an Initial and Long-Term Coping and Adaptation Mechanism

Authors A. Ncube, Andries Jordaan, Yonas T. Bahta
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
31 Journal Article

When nationalism meets soft skills: Towards a comprehensive framework for explaining ethno-migrant inequality in the Dutch labour market.

Authors Hans Siebers
Year 2018
Book Title Towards a decent labour market for low waged migrant workers.
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
32 Book Chapter

Causality Chains in the International Migration Systems Approach

Authors Roel Jennissen
Year 2007
Journal Name Population Research and Policy Review
Citations (WoS) 29
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
33 Journal Article

Poland’s Perspective on the Intra-European Movement of Poles. Implications and Governance Responses

Authors Marta Kindler
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
34 Book Chapter

Does International Migration Pay Off? The Labor Market Situation of Finnish Return Migrants Based on Longitudinal Register Data

Authors Saara Koikkalainen, Ritva Linnakangas, Asko Suikkanen
Year 2016
Journal Name Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
35 Journal Article

Employment, education and life worlds of young women with a migration background

Description
Education and employment are crucial factors concerning social and economic integration into Austrian society. However, recent studies have shown that women with a migration background are disadvantaged with regard to employment and education when compared to men with a migration background as well as to women without such a migration background. The reasons for these disadvantages are manifold and comprise factors such as inadequate qualifications, low educational profiles, but also discrimination, difficulties in acknowledging foreign qualifications or the need to prove German language skills on a very high level. Furthermore, factors that are not easy to measure, such as benefits of family and social networks or attitudes regarding family or work, may indirectly impact on the employment situation and educational profiles of women with a migration background. Moreover, factors unrelated to migration, such as lack of positions that offer work-life balance, weaken the position of women with a migration background on the labour market. This said, the employment and education situation of women with a migration background is in fact very heterogeneous. In particular, first generation migrants and women coming from countries outside of the EU show lower labour market participation rates and face higher unemployment than other groups. However, to date, systematic analysis examining the combination of factors explaining the employment and education situations of women with migration history are scarce. Moreover, there is a need to combine existing statistical data on socio-demographic characteristics, educational attainment, de-skilling, discrimination, and “soft” factors, such as attitudes to work, family and education to better understand individual decision-making processes and structural disadvantages. Objectives of the project • Analyse the employment and education situation of young migrant women with specific regard to social and family contexts. • Identify factors that shape labour market and educational outcomes. • Identify good practices to promote the labour market performance of women with a migration background • Formulate policy recommendations. To reach these aims, the study applies multiple methods including desk research, secondary statistical analysis, and qualitative interviews with experts, practitioners and young women themselves.
Year 2012
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
36 Project

How many hours do you have to work to be integrated? Full-time and part-time employment of native and ethnic minority women in the Netherlands

Authors P Bevelander, Sandra Groeneveld
Year 2012
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
37 Journal Article

The occupational integration of migrant women in Western European labour markets

Authors Gabriele Ballarino, Nazareno Panichella
Year 2018
Journal Name Acta Sociologica
Citations (WoS) 2
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
40 Journal Article

Why are Migrants' Not Participating in Welfare Programs? Evidence from Shanghai, China

Authors Yeqing Huang, Zhiming Cheng
Year 2014
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
41 Journal Article

Welfare Programme Participation and the Wellbeing of Non-local Rural Migrants in Metropolitan China: A Social Exclusion Perspective

Authors Yeqing Huang, F Guo
Year 2017
Journal Name Social indicators research, 2018, OnlineFirst
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
42 Journal Article

The Local Economic Imprint of Return Migrants in Bolivia

Authors Richard C. Jones
Year 2011
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 15
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
43 Journal Article

Rural‐urban migration and gender division of labor in transitional China

Authors C. Cindy Fan
Year 2003
Journal Name International Journal of Urban and Regional Research
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
44 Journal Article

Remittances and informal work

Authors Artjoms Ivlevs
Year 2016
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANPOWER
Citations (WoS) 2
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
45 Journal Article

Migration and Polarisation on the Labour Market

Principal investigator Gabriella Elgenius (Project Leader), Denis Frank (Participants ), Vedran Omanovic (Participants)
Description
This project is one of six projects within the six year programme: The Challenges of Polarization on the Swedish Labour Market at the Department of Sociology and Work Science funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Forte. This project addresses the integration of migrants and minorities into the Swedish labour market by assessing the extent, implications and experiences of ethnic polarisation across different dimensions; that is, between majority and minority populations (first and second generations); and the diversity within the migrant workforce and its distribution across the occupational structure. Classical migration theory holds that migrants are recruited to perform jobs in the lower sections of the labour market that native workers avoid (Piore 1979; Massey et al. 1998). This also applies to Sweden, where many migrants are employed in low-wage and insecure employment (Johansson & Vingård, 2012). Comparisons of Western Europe countries have show that labour markets are polarised because ethnic minorities do not compete on equal terms with majority populations, and experience a substantial ‘ethnic penalty’ in the second generation (Heath & Cheung 2007; Johnson 2010). Given such patterns, important question arise concerning the prospects of migrants (both first and second generations) to transition into better-paid segments of the labour market and what strategies migrants develop to reduce the impact of discrimination (Modood 2015; Elgenius 2017). Sweden is considered one of the most gendered labour markets in the world (Charles & Grusky 2004) and intersections of ethnicity and gender need be considered as a ‘double disadvantage’ (Bradley & Healy 2008). However, the tendency towards polarisation within the migrant workforce is another focus for this project as diversity-within is visible with an increasing share of highly skilled migrants in Sweden; for example, computing professionals from India. Thus, the fact that migrant groups are unevenly distributed across the occupational structure requires further attention. For instance, the largest share of migrants within the construction sector is from Eastern Europe, whereas Indian nationals are concentrated in the IT sector (Migrationsverket). This project will critically appraise migrants’ occupational status, prospects and experiences in the Swedish labour market by focusing on diversity within the migrant workforce and the experiences of ethnic penalties in first and second generations (see, e.g., Elgenius 2011, 2017; Frank 2012, 2014; Omanović 2009, 2013, Knights and Omanović 2016).
Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
46 Project

Labour Force Participation and Employment of Humanitarian Migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia Longitudinal Data

Authors Zhiming Cheng, Lucy Taksa, Ben Zhe Wang
Year 2021
Journal Name JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
47 Journal Article

Growth, Equal Opportunities, Migration, and Markets

Principal investigator Ruud Koopmans (Principal Investigator), Susanne Veit (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives The GEMM project addresses the ‘Migration, Prosperity and Growth Dimension’ of the call on the European Growth Agenda within the Horizon 2020 framework of the European Commission. With over 20 researchers located in 8 countries in Europe, our consortium will approach this important topic and deliver: An analysis of the obstacles to the successful incorporation of migrants and in particular to the attraction and retention of highly skilled migrants; A thorough assessment of the migration related drivers of growth and the optimal functioning of markets; An assessment of ethnic inequality in the labor market as a barrier to competitiveness and innovation in Europe; A set of policy recommendations that contain concrete guidelines as to how migrants can contribute to the EU economy and society. These deliverables are realized by putting forward an innovative research agenda that combines scientific rigor, a mixed methods and comparative approach, and crosscutting expertise. The main contribution of this project is to advance our understanding of ethnic inequality as a central barrier to the optimal functioning of the European labor market and thus to growth and innovation. Ethnic inequality inhibits two main migration related drivers of growth: the efficient use of human capital and managing mobility of human capital both within Europe and from other regions in the world. In the research framework, we analyze the interrelatedness between ethnic inequality as a barrier to growth, and the two migration-related drivers of growth. We achieve a unified research focus across work packages in two ways: by analyzing types of migrants defined by their educational qualifications – individuals with high, medium and vocational, and low skills; by exploring three sets of determinants of inequality - individual (gender, age, health, family situation, caring responsibilities, social ties (friendship ties), religious affiliation), contextual (neighborhood deprivation, segregation, climate of reception), institutional determinants (employment discrimination, labor market (occupational, sectoral) segmentation, flexibility and security of work, access to social welfare (policy regimes more broadly)."
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
48 Project

Back to Basics - Literacy Proficiency, Immigration and Labour Market Outcomes in Sweden

Authors Margherita Bussi, Jon Pareliussen
Year 2017
Journal Name Social Policy & Administration
Citations (WoS) 2
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
49 Journal Article

Culture at work: Polish migrants in the ethnic division of labour on Norwegian construction sites

Authors Jon Horgen Friberg
Year 2012
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 23
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
50 Journal Article

The Ethical Agendas of Employment Agencies Towards Migrant Workers in the UK: Deciphering the Codes

Authors Chris Forde, Robert MacKenzie
Year 2010
Journal Name JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
53 Journal Article

Ethnicity, job search and labor market reintegration of the unemployed

Authors Amelie Constant, KF Zimmermann, Martin Kahanec, ...
Year 2011
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANPOWER
Citations (WoS) 8
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
54 Journal Article

Vulnerability, Exploitation and Migrants

Authors Gary Craig, Louise Waite, Hannah Lewis, ...
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
55 Book

Migrant Capital

Authors Umut Erel, Louise Ryan, Alessio D’Angelo
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
56 Book

The Inequality Effect of Urbanization and Social Integration

Authors Yunsong Chen, Zhang Yi
Year 2016
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCES IN CHINA
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
57 Journal Article

Social Networks and Labour Market Access among Brazilian Migrants in Ireland

Authors Garret Maher, Mary Cawley
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
59 Journal Article

Why are Migrants' Not Participating in Welfare Programs? Evidence from Shanghai, China

Authors Yeqing Huang, Zhiming Cheng
Year 2014
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
Citations (WoS) 8
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
60 Journal Article

Evaluation of Immigration- and Integration Policies

Principal investigator Daniel Auer (Principal Investigator ), Flavia Fossati (Principal Investigator ), Carlos Vargas-Silva (Principal Investigator ), Stefanie Kurt (Principal Investigator ), Dennis Egger (Principal Investigator ), Johannes Kunz (Principal Investigator ), Damaris Rose (Principal Investigator )
Description
"In this project, we investigate the (sometimes unintended) consequences of policies that have been implemented to regulate immigration and to subsequently facilitate the socio-economic integration of newly arrived immigrants. (1) Networks: First, we exploit a natural experiment in Switzerland, where asylum seekers are randomly assigned to cantons. This immigration policy can be regarded as a transparent and neutral way of distributing refugees across a country to “share a burden”. At the same time, such restrictions regarding free movement within a country come with hefty consequences for the persons affected. On the one hand, a large share of jobs are found through referrals within social networks: in the US, for instance, around 30-60% (Bewley, 2007). At least since Granovetter (1973), a rich theoretical literature has rationalized this fact by modelling networks as non-market institutions that help overcome information frictions inherent in the labor market. From workers' perspective, networks grant their members preferential access to information on high-quality job openings, e.g. as in Calvo-Armengol and Jackson (2004). On the firm side, networks may help alleviate the asymmetric information problem in hiring leading potentially to a better job-match, e.g. as in Beaman and Magruder (2012). In our study, we focus on the value of social networks from the perspective of workers. Swiss asylum policy provides a unique natural experiment to study the effects of social networks on labor market outcomes. Because of the truly exogenous placement, long horizon over which the policy was in place and the large sample size, we can delve deeper into the mechanisms of how social networks affect labor market integration than previous studies have done and look at network structure beyond simply its size. Our findings will enable us to distinguish among a large set of theoretical models of the value of networks from the point of view of individual job seekers. (2) Maternity: At the same time, such immigration policies also affect the social integration of immigrants and, in our case, individual health and wellbeing. Specifically, we exploit the same unique setting to assess the relevance of information on infants' health. Random allocation of asylum seekers in Switzerland allows us to first, study the spatial differences in health care provision across the country. Further, by exploiting that French-speaking refugees are randomly placed in French- or non-French-speaking regions, we can credibly identify the language-match-health-gap, based on refugees that do not speak French as a control group and placed on either side of the language border (in a Difference in Differences framework). By extending the language to a novel (continuous) measure of language distance, we are able to factor out country of origin effects using bi-lateral regressions. A second strand of policies targets the (economic) integration of immigrants and generally of persons outside the labor market. A common approach is to provide measures, so-called Active Labor Market Programs (ALMP) that enhance a jobseeker’s employability (e.g., through additional human capital) or that keep a person close to the labor market through occupational programs. (3) Access Bias: Some measures, however, can negatively affect labor market outcomes, such as unemployment duration and post-unemployment wages, because of factors such as human capital deprivation or lock-in effects. Based on encompassing registry data that allow researchers to control for usually unobserved employability variables, we find evidence of a systematic access bias whereby caseworkers in Switzerland assign unemployed immigrants to activation measures based on what we call a competition logic that is mainly driven by and conforms to an economic rationale and the job center’s performance evaluation. From the perspective of immigrants’ labor market integration, this may be problematic because it results in an overrepresentation of immigrants in measures with little efficacy rather than in measures that could compensate for (some of) their employability disadvantages. Conversely, we find that Swiss citizens are relatively advantaged in the ability to access more measures that promote human capital enhancement (compensation logic) and that have been shown to be successful tools for labor market reintegration. It is plausible that a stronger reliance on the competition logic by caseworkers and the consequential overrepresentation of migrants in low-efficacy measures amplifies migrants’ general labor market disadvantages. (4) Priming: This rather negative stance on integration measures in the form of ALMPs is further advanced by a study where we present indications that ALMP participants are pushed into lower paying jobs compared to equally qualified non-participants. In this study on the effect of subjective beliefs on employment outcomes we find that the employment chances one year after the start of unemployment increase for both ALMP participants and non-participants when self-control and employment beliefs are high. In contrast, higher initial reservation wages increase employment chances for non-participants but substantially reduce them for ALMP participants. Previous studies have shown that beneficial effects of activation measures are often abrogated by lock-in effects, human capital deprivation, and/or negative signals to prospective employers, all of which are particularly harmful for highly skilled workers and higher-paying jobs. We argue that these detrimental effects ultimately push ALMP participants into jobs below their expected salary, where the negative consequences of activation measures are less pronounced. (5) Heterogeneity: A related aspect that is crucial from an integration perspective is whether such effects of ALMPs differ across groups, that is, whether the participation of “natives” turns out to have different consequences for their labor market performance compared to participating immigrants. In this study, we argue that effect heterogeneity between native and migrant participants can provide information about the type of discrimination that migrants face in the labor market. Using encompassing administrative data from Switzerland, we observe all registered jobseekers in 2004 and follow their monthly labor market trajectories over 10 subsequent years. Our findings are consistent with earlier evaluations of ALMPs in Switzerland and elsewhere, which find that participation effects of ALMPs are limited and sometimes even negative. However, findings show that employers value the additional productivity-related information of ALMP participation more if participants have a foreign nationality. We infer that labor market discrimination against migrants is dominated by statistical reasoning on the part of prospective employers. (6) LM-Index: Eventually, we provide a meta-analytical study where we argue that comparative assessments of integration policies fail to properly take confounding factors into account. That is, immigrant groups exposed to integration policies in different countries differ in their characteristics because immigration policies and migrants’ destination choice induce an ex-ante bias. To circumvent this limit to comparative analyses, we aspire to collect and generate data on all existing policy dimensions and subsequently provide a comparative analysis of immigrants’ labor market integration in industrialized countries."
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
63 Project

‘Wo benanε aεyε bebree’: the economic impact of remittances of Netherlands-based Ghanaian migrants on rural Ashanti

Authors Mirjam Kabki, Valentina Mazzucato, Ernest Appiah
Year 2004
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
67 Journal Article

Earthquake Impacts on Immigrant Participation in the Greater Christchurch Construction Labor Market

Authors Sin Meun How, Geoffrey N. Kerr
Year 2019
Journal Name Population Research and Policy Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
68 Journal Article

Hyper-individualized recruitment: Rural-urban labour migration and precarious construction work in Bangladesh

Authors Selim Reza
Year 2016
Journal Name Migration, Mobility, & Displacement
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
69 Journal Article

Skills and Social Reproductive Work

Authors Parvati Raghuram, Eleonore Kofman
Book Title Gendered Migrations and Global Social Reproduction
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
73 Book Chapter

Economic integration in an urban labor market

Authors Younoussi Zourkaleini, Victor Piché
Year 2007
Journal Name Demographic Research
Citations (WoS) 3
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
74 Journal Article

Immigrant Men's Labour Market Incorporation in South Africa: Regional and National Origin Differences

Authors Emmanuel F. Souza, CA Flippen
Year 2020
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
75 Journal Article

Commercial migration intermediaries and the segmentation of skilled migrant employment

Authors Di van den Broek, William Harvey, Dimitria Groutsis
Year 2016
Journal Name WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
76 Journal Article

Ukrainian Migration to Poland: A “Local” Mobility?

Authors Marta Kindler, Zuzanna Brunarska, Monika Szulecka, ...
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
77 Book Chapter

The hospitality sector as an employer of skill discounted migrants. Evidence from Australia

Authors Gerrit J. M. Treuren, Ashokkumar Manoharan, Vidya Vishnu
Year 2019
Journal Name JOURNAL OF POLICY RESEARCH IN TOURISM LEISURE AND EVENTS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
78 Journal Article

Parental migration and young migrants’ wages in urban China: An exploratory analysis

Authors Lidan Lyu, Yu Chen
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
79 Journal Article

Towards Effective Temporary Labor Migration Schemes Report on Lebanon and Jordan

Authors Eugene SENSENIG-DABBOUS, Guita HOURANI
Description
Migration policy is one of the fields least scrutinized in the Arab world. Responding to international economic trends, policy makers, social partners, and civil society players in Jordan and Lebanon have come to the realization that certain labour market bottlenecks can only be overcome by bringing in foreign workers. This has led to a significant immigration of laborers from a wide variety of countries and forced all relevant participants in the policy making process to renew their interest in coordinated temporary labour migration schemes. Both in Jordan and Lebanon, experts and policy makers alike see opportunities in these schemes that can help them meet the changing demands in their labour markets without permanently adding to their populations and labour forces. In the countries of origin, reciprocally, temporary labour migration schemes are intended to allow governments to alleviate pressures on their labour markets in the short and medium-term, and also let them reap the benefits of migration, through remittances and skill acquisition. In this study the authors will consider, based on a tripartite approach, whether the interests of employers and workers organizations coincide with those of governments in designing and implementing temporary migration schemes. The internationally codified rights of migrant workers to equality and non-discrimination and to their integration into societies and workplaces will be compared to the realities on the ground in Lebanon and Jordan. Have the limited provisions for protecting employees’ rights and a lack of their integration into the host societies negatively affected policy goals, closely linked to social cohesion? Does the effective protection of migrant workers contradict the needs of the indigenous populations in Lebanon and Jordan in general? Can the empowerment of the migrants themselves and their inclusion into the tripartite decision making process facilitate migration policy reform? Which social players can – and have – step in if the state and social partners neglect those roles foreseen for them by the international organizations dealing primarily with migrant labour, first and foremost the International Labour Organization (ILO)?
Year 2011
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
81 Report

Enterprises Meet Migrants for Employment

Principal investigator Pablo Pumares Fernández (Project Mabager Spanish partner)
Description
The EMME project aims to promote and raise awareness on early and effective integration of third country nationals in the labour market. To reach this overall objective the project envisages a transnational partnership composed by key actors in the field of labour market integration, private employment service, support and representation of enterprises, education and vocational training. The partner organizations will involve enterprises since the beginning of the project and will offer a range of interconnected services aimed at: Promoting diversity and non-discrimination at the workplace Promoting the use of EU Skills Profile Tool for TCNs Providing training programmes that support TCNs to integrate into the workplace and supporting their skills development Supporting employers in hiring TCNs Providing post placement support to TCNs and employers
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
82 Project

Bodies of work: skilling at the bottom of the global nursing care chain

Authors Yasmin Y. Ortiga, Jenica Ana Rivero
Year 2019
Journal Name Globalizations
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
83 Journal Article

Humanising migrant women's work

Authors Agnieszka Rydzik, Annette Pritchard, Nigel Morgan, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name ANNALS OF TOURISM RESEARCH
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
84 Journal Article

A study on undocumented migrant workers in the Dutch household sector

Authors Masood Gheasi, P Nijkamp, P Rietveld
Year 2014
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANPOWER
Citations (WoS) 3
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
85 Journal Article

Ukrainians in the Czech Republic: On the Pathway from Temporary Foreign Workers to One of the Largest Minority Groups

Authors Yana Leontiyeva
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
86 Book Chapter

The Effects of the Crisis on Occupational Segregation of Skilled Migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean in the United States, 2006-2012

Authors Luciana Gandini, Fernando Lozano-Ascencio
Year 2016
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 2
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
87 Journal Article

The Emergence of a Low-Skill Migrant Labour Market: Structural Constraints, Discourses of Difference and Blocked Mobility

Authors Huw Vasey
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
88 Journal Article

Trapped in Precariousness? Risks and Opportunities of Female Immigrants and Natives Transitioning from Part-Time Jobs in Spain

Authors Jacobo Muñoz-Comet, Stephanie Steinmetz
Year 2020
Journal Name Work, Employment and Society
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
89 Journal Article

Ukrainian Migration to Greece: from Irregular Work to Settlement, Family Reunification and Return

Authors Marina Nikolova, Michaela Maroufof
Year 2016
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
90 Book Chapter

SOCIOECONOMIC TYPES OF CONTEMPORARY RUSSIAN OTKHODNIKS (DOMESTIC TEMPORARY LABOUR MIGRANTS)

Authors Natalia N. Zhidkevich
Year 2016
Journal Name VESTNIK TOMSKOGO GOSUDARSTVENNOGO UNIVERSITETA-FILOSOFIYA-SOTSIOLOGIYA-POLITOLOGIYA-TOMSK STATE UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY SOCIOLOGY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
93 Journal Article

Egyptian men working abroad: Labour supply responses by the women left behind

Authors Christine Binzel, Ragui Assaad
Year 2011
Journal Name Labour Economics
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
94 Journal Article

First a job, then a child? Subgroup variation in women's employment-fertility link

Authors Jonas Wood, Karel Neels
Year 2017
Journal Name ADVANCES IN LIFE COURSE RESEARCH
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
95 Journal Article

“Migrant Capital” and Domestic Work: Labour Trajectories of Immigrant Women in Spain

Authors Alberto Rey, Tania Paniagua de la Iglesia, Jesús Rivera‐Navarro
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
96 Journal Article

Migration, religion and work in comparative perspective. Evangelical ‘ethnic churches’ in Southern Europe

Description
How do Evangelical migrants use religion and church-related networks to seek employment, pursue social mobility, construct respectability and resist racism? How do Evangelical churches become ‘brokers’ of socio-economic integration of their members thus stakeholders in immigration countries? These are the main questions that this project seeks to answer. MIGRANTCHRISTIANITY investigates how migrant men and women from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America make use of a minority religion in negotiating their social and economic integration in Europe. The project focuses on Ghanaian and Ecuadorian migrants in Italy and Spain. I investigate how migrants develop strategies of integration through the Evangelical churches and how such strategies are shaped by ethnicity, class, gender and age. I also look at how Evangelical churches act as ‘brokers’ of integration, in relation to employment but also with reference to a wider social positioning of the migrant as a ‘minority Christian’. In doing so, the research contributes to our understanding of the role of religion in migrants’ integration or marginalisation and of how migration is reconfiguring the Italian and Spanish societies through the production of new understandings of Christianity: these churches challenge the Catholic majority religion as well as dominant views of migrant religion as Islam only. The MIGRANTCHRISTIANITY project brings together two hitherto separate strands of research: that on migrant labour and ethnicity on the one hand, and that on migration and religion, more specifically on migration-driven Evangelical churches, on the other.
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
97 Project

“Not helping out”: classed strategies of the (non) contribution of children in immigrant family businesses

Authors María Villares-Varela
Year 2017
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 3
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
99 Journal Article
SHOW FILTERS
Ask us