Family relations and migration

Migration is a process which involves individuals but also  families. For example, family relations can influence integration processes and family relations can change as a family members migrate. This topic considers the post-migration relationships in (extended) families that have been united (for instance, through marriage) or separated by migration, or who have migrated together. 

Studies listed under this topic include literature on marriage migration, family reunification, the relationship between family ties and economic stability, social capital, family ties among non-migrants in rural areas, ethnic language maintenance, transnationalism, and parental influences on anti-immigrant attitudes in host societies. 

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Made in France? Chinese Student Return Migration from French Business Schools

Authors Wei SHEN
Description
Chinese migration to France is not a new phenomenon; however, France has seen rapid growth of migration from China in the past decade. Among the increasingly diverse migratory flow, a prominent group is Chinese students. As in many European countries, more and more Chinese students are now studying in France, at universities, grandes écoles and language schools etc… There is limited research focusing on this group of migrants. Therefore, this paper will analyse the circular migration of Chinese students between China and France by focusing on the return migration from elite French business schools. It illustrates the importance of prior experiences and pre-acquisition of academic and professional capital on their choice to migrate to France. At the same time, this paper investigates how family ties with China and institutional agents (private and public sectors) and the multiple-layers of forces (national and supranational) behind Chinese student return migration. This paper argues that the strong family relations and contacts, career strategy and prospects for returnees and confidence in the Chinese economy are significant return factors. Returnees’ academic, professional and social experiences in France are also important in their decision. In addition, it shows how these talents are integrated in the skilled labour market and how they maintain connections with France. The return migration of Chinese students from France is a unique link and network, which needs cooperation from both parties to ensure a win-win brains circulation.
Year 2008
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2 Report

Biographic Consequences of Parent Child-Separation during the Migration Process: The Case of Guest-Worker Migration to Germany

Principal investigator Rahim Hajji (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives Research on youth migration in Germany has given little attention to transnational family relations so far. The project explores both the extent and the long-term individual consequences of migration-related family separation during childhood. The first part of the study focuses on guest-workers' immigration strategies in order to explain the development and consequences of transnational family relations in the context of the recruitment of ""gastarbeiter"" in Germany. The study differentiates between guest workers from Southern Europe (Greece, Italy, Spain, Yugosla­via and Portugal) and from Islamic Mediterranean countries (Turkey, Morocco, Tunisia). Survey data are used to construct and describe ""migration chains"" in order to test hypotheses on transnational family relations and the extent of resulting parent-child separation. The analysis of qualitative data gathered from interviews with young migrants living in Germany permits the investigation of the familial decision-making processes concerning migration and the cones­quences of separation from parents experienced during childhood. At the second stage, the project also analyses the attachment behaviour of migrants who, in the context of immigration to Germany, temporarily lived in transnational families during their childhood. The idea that a separation from parents experienced during childhood will influence the general attachment behaviour forms the core thesis of attachment theory (Bowlby 1969, Ainsworth 1985a). But instead of concentrating on immediate social consequences of migration-related parental loss on the child-parent-relationship, the study analyses the marital status of adults depending on whether they experienced separation from their parent(s) due to migration during their childhood. Research design, data and methodology Data are analysed descriptively and by means of logistic regression models, using the German Mikrozensus 2005. Additionally, a series of interviews has been conducted with young Moroccan migrants who had been temporarily separated from their parents. Findings The extent of separation experiences differs according to ethnic background. Children with an Islamic Mediterranean background have a significantly higher hazard of experiencing a migration-related separation from one of their parents (mostly, from their father) than those from Southern European countries. A temporary loss of both parents was observed more frequently among young migrants with a European origin. The interviews reveal that it is much more difficult for the children to deal with the absence of both parents. Regression results show that the experience of a separation from parents during childhood significantly reduces the chances of marriage among adult migrants, and that the age at separation plays an important role, while the duration does not show any effects."
Year 2008
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4 Project

Chinese American immigrant parents’ emotional expression in the family: Relations with parents’ cultural orientations and children’s emotion-related regulation.

Authors Stephen H. Chen, Qing Zhou, Alexandra Main, ...
Journal Name Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
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6 Journal Article

Psychological Well-Being, Family Relations, and Developmental Issues of Children Left Behind

Authors Giovanni G. Valtolina, Chiara Colombo
Year 2012
Journal Name Psychological Reports
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7 Journal Article

RELACJE MIĘDZYGENERACYJNE NA ODLEGŁOŚĆ W PERSPEKTYWIE RODZICÓW EMIGRANTÓW Z WOJEWÓDZTWA ŚLĄSKIEGO

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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8 Journal Article

The Economic Returns of Immigrants' Bonding and Bridging Social Capital: The Case of the Netherlands

Authors Bram LANCEE
Year 2010
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 81
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9 Journal Article

Compatriots, family alliances and economic inequalities: the trajectory of Portuguese Jose Lopes Ferreira in societies of Morretes and Paranagua (Province of Sao Paulo, 1824-1837)

Authors Andre Luiz Moscaleski Cavazzani, Sandro Aramis Richter Gomes
Year 2016
Journal Name REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE HISTORIA & CIENCIAS SOCIAIS
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10 Journal Article

Dynamics of Mental Health of Migrants

Principal investigator Hannes Kröger (Principal Investigator), Ana Nanette Tibubos (Principal Investigator)
Description
Theoretische Modelle akkulturativen Stresses heben die große Bedeutung der Veränderung psychischer Gesundheit von Migrantinenn und Migranten über längere Zeiträume hinweg. Innerhalb des Migrationsregimes des Aufnahmelandes ist die Entwicklung der psychischen Gesundheit dabei durch Stressoren und Resilienzfaktoren beeinflusst. Persönlichkeitsmerkmale und Familienbeziehungen und -struktur sind zwei wichtige Determinanten psychischer Gesundheit, die bisher nicht in einer längsschnittlichen, auf Veränderung fokussierten Analyse untersucht wurden. Das DMHM-Projekt zielt darauf ab diese Lücke in der Forschungsliteratur zu schließen.
Year 2019
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11 Project

In a Decision Trap – Debates around Caring and Care Provisions in Transnational Families. The Ukrainian Case

Year 2015
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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12 Journal Article

The influence of social relationships on international students' intentions to remain abroad: multi-group analysis by marital status

Authors Sehoon Kim
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
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14 Journal Article

Palestine: The demographic and economic dimension of migration

Authors Mustafa KHAWAJA
Description
Political and economic instability, the uncertainty of the future of the region, together with the importance of extended family relations have all been major determinants in the size and patterns of migration from Palestinian Territory. This paper focuses on recent trends in emigration and return migration from and to Palestine by presenting the main results of the Migration Survey implemented by the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics in 2010, the first survey of its kind. In addition, the desire to emigrate among Palestinians will be explored. A final section will then be dedicated to inward migration, i.e. foreign-born Palestinians living on the West Bank and in Gaza Strip. L'instabilité politique et économique, l'incertitude de l'avenir de la région ainsi que l'importance des relations familières ont été des facteurs déterminants de migration en partance des territoires palestiniens. Cette analyse se concentre sur les tendances enregistrées au cours de la période récente du phénomène migratoire, et plus précisément s’agissant de l'émigration et la migration de retour de et vers la Palestine, à l’appui des résultats tirés de l'Enquête sur la Migration conduite par le Bureau central palestinien des statistiques en 2010 - la première enquête du genre. En outre, les facteurs déterminants la décision et la volonté d'émigrer parmi les Palestiniens feront l’objet d’une analyse circonstanciée. Une dernière section sera consacrée aux étrangers résidant dans la Bande de Gaza.
Year 2012
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15 Report

Gender and labor in Asian immigrant families

Authors Yen Le Espiritu
Year 1999
Journal Name American Behavioral Scientist, 2014, Vol. 58, No. 12, pp. 1614-1633
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16 Journal Article

Gender Roles and Practices in Polish Migration Families in Norway through the Eyes of Children

Year 2015
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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17 Journal Article

Migracja jako kryzys więzi społecznej? Analiza na przykładzie Wielkiej Brytanii i Irlandii

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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19 Journal Article

Migraciones “Al Margen”: grupos rumanos, diversidad y control social

Authors José López Riopedre
Year 2017
Journal Name Revista Internacional de Estudios Migratorios.
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21 Journal Article

Zuwanderung internationaler Migranten in schrumpfende ländliche Regionen: die Fallbeispiele Ostsachsen und Saarland

Authors Robert Nadler, Michael Kriszan, Birte Nienaber, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name Europa Regional
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23 Journal Article

(In)Security, Family and Settlement: Migration Decisions Amongst Central and East European Families in Scotland

Year 2017
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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24 Journal Article

(In)Security, Family and Settlement: Migration Decisions Amongst Central and East European Families in Scotland

Year 2017
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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25 Journal Article

(In)Security, Family and Settlement: Migration Decisions Amongst Central and East European Families in Scotland

Authors Rebecca Kay, Paulina Trevena
Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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26 Journal Article

Social and economic rights of refugees and displaced persons in Azerbaijan

Authors Alovsat ALIYEV
Description
Patronage of the country is not limited to identifying the status of a refugee and displaced person and providing them with certain documents; it also deals with ensuring and protecting their social and economic rights. Azerbaijan is a post-Soviet country with a lot of refugees and displaced persons: 300 thousand naturalized refugees, 760 thousand displaced persons, around 2 thousand persons seeking political asylum and thousands of persons whose status is unclear1 This report aims to analyze current situation from the standpoint of legislation in the field refugee rights, namely right to labor and certain labor conditions, right to social protection and social security, access to public service, right to be provided with meals, clothes and residence, right to medical care, rights in the field of family relations and right to education. . From the first days of independence, the Republic of Azerbaijan has been taking steps to improve legislation and strengthen government agencies that are involved in legal relations with asylum seekers, refugees and displaced persons and are in charge of their social protection. Azerbaijan acceded to all UN Conventions relating to refugees and introduced certain changes into national legislation in accordance with these conventions. In addition to that, Azerbaijan is making efforts to solve the problems of displaced persons relying on UNHCR Guiding Principles. In addition to the law “On status of refugees and forcibly displaced (persons displaced within the country) persons”2 , which is the main law regulating rights of refugees and displaced persons, Azerbaijan also adopted some normative acts to enforce that law3 On May 21, 1999 the law “On social protection of displaced persons and persons . 4 equalized to them” was adopted. This law defines obligations of government bodies regarding accommodation of displaced persons and persons equalized to them (hereinafter referred to as displaced persons), their social protection etc.
Year 2013
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27 Report

Learning from our past: the effect of forced migration from Karelia on family life. (225 000 €)

Principal investigator John Loer ()
Description
Project description: The consequences of forced migrations are felt worldwide and faced by millions of people each year. The plight of migrants has come to the forefront recently as masses of people have migrated to Europe seeking asylum from predicaments faced at home. We will investigate the World War II evacuation of Karelians to southern and central Finland to determine the long-term outcomes of forced migration in order to learn from the past. The evacuees encountered much the same traumas and faced similar prejudices and resentment that current migrants face, making this population particularly appropriate to gain insight into the present and future of European migrants. Using an untapped data set from hundreds of thousands of displaced migrants and resident Finns, we will investigate the effect of forced migration on family relations and childbearing and assess the integration of migrants into society. In this project we will assess: 1) whether marital and reproductive behaviour of evacuees and resident Finns differ, 2) the consequences of mobility on reproductive behaviour, 3) whether the presence of neighbours or kin (e.g. grandmothers or siblings) mitigates effects on reproductive behaviour, 4) the socio-economic and social integration of migrants into society through marriage and the accumulation of wealth. These questions will be assessed relative to the study subject age at migration and gender, to determine the characteristics of sensitivity to forced migration. In this research project we intend to investigate the Karelian evacuees from a perspective never before considered and gain insight into general questions important to modern society by studying past events. There are few population level studies available on forced migrants’ marital and reproductive behaviour, and none that can assess marital and reproductive behaviour, kin relationships, and mobility before and after forced migration and at a multigenerational level. Workgroup members Monthly grant recipients:John Loehr, Pettay Jenni, To be named To be named Other members: Anna Rotkirch, Johanna Mappes, Mirkka Danielsbacka, Tuomas Salmi, Virpi Lummaa
Year 2016
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29 Project

Parent-child acculturation and cultural values differences: Associations with children’s self-esteem and aggression

Authors Rosa I. Toro, Tanya Nieri
Year 2018
Journal Name International Journal of Intercultural Relations
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30 Journal Article

Longitudinal measurement equivalence of subjective language brokering experiences scale in Mexican American adolescents.

Authors Su Yeong Kim, Yishan Shen, Minyu Zhang, ...
Journal Name Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
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31 Journal Article

A Community-Based Mindfulness Intervention Among Latino Adolescents and Their Parents: A Qualitative Feasibility and Acceptability Study

Authors Jessica Tobin, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Ricky N. Bluthenthal, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH
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32 Journal Article

PARENTAL CO-USE OF MEDIA TECHNOLOGY WITH THEIR YOUNG CHILDREN IN THE USA

Authors Sabrina L. Connell, Alexis R. Lauricella, Ellen Wartella
Year 2015
Journal Name JOURNAL OF CHILDREN AND MEDIA
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34 Journal Article

Linking the family context of migration during childhood to the well-being of young adults: Evidence from the UK and France

Authors Tatiana Eremenko, Rachel Bennett
Year 2018
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 4
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36 Journal Article

The social construction and context of domestic violence in Wakiso District, Uganda

Authors DK Kaye, Anna Mia Ekstrom, Florence Mirembe, ...
Year 2005
Journal Name CULTURE HEALTH & SEXUALITY
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37 Journal Article

Erwerb von sprachlichen und kulturellen Kompetenzen von Migrantenkindern

Principal investigator Hartmut Esser (Principal Investigator), Oliver Klein (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Das Projekt „Erwerb von sprachlichen und kulturellen Kompetenzen von Migrantenkindern“ (ESKOM) hatte zum Ziel, die Entwicklungs- und Bildungsverläufe von Kindern mit türkischem Migrationshintergrund und Kindern ohne Migrationshintergrund ab der frühen Kindheit (im Alter von drei Jahren) bis zum Übergang in die Sekundarstufe I (Ende der vierten Klasse) zu analysieren. Hierzu wurden circa 1.200 Familien (die Hälfte davon mit türkischem Migrationshintergrund) in sechs Erhebungswellen befragt. Zusätzlich fanden in verschiedenen Kompetenzbereichen standardisierte Tests mit deren Kindern statt. Darüber hinaus wurden die besuchten Kindergärten und Grundschulen schriftlich befragt. Kompetenzunterschiede zwischen Kindern mit und ohne (türkischem) Migrationshintergrund finden sich bereits im Alter von drei Jahren. In den Bereichen Kognition und Mathematik fallen diese gering aus, im Bereich der deutschen Sprachfähigkeiten finden sich größere Nachteile für türkischstämmige Kinder. Die Kompetenzentwicklung verläuft in den Bereichen Kognition und Mathematik in beiden Gruppen sehr ähnlich. Im Bereich der deutschen Sprachfähigkeiten nehmen die anfänglichen Kompetenznachteile über die Zeit ab, beim kulturellen Wissen hingegen zu. Frühkindliche deutschsprachliche Fähigkeiten erweisen sich als bedeutend für spätere schulische Leistungen und die Übergangswahrscheinlichkeit auf ein Gymnasium. In der frühen Kindheit stellen die Familie sowie vorschulische Bildungseinrichtungen wichtige Lernumgebungen für Kinder dar. Anregende Eltern-Kind-Aktivitäten (z.B. Vorlesen) sind positiv mit der Entwicklung in allen Kompetenzbereichen assoziiert und finden in türkischstämmigen Familien seltener statt als in autochthonen Familien. Die Bedeutsamkeit der Aktivitäten für gesellschaftsspezifische Kompetenzen (deutsche Sprache, kulturelles Wissen) ist vom kulturellen Inhalt der familiären Lernumwelt abhängig. Kinder türkischer Herkunft treten durchschnittlich später in vorschulische Bildungseinrichtungen ein als autochthone Kinder und besuchen häufiger Einrichtungen mit höherem Anteil an Kindern mit Migrationshintergrund. Für türkischstämmige Kinder mit nichtdeutscher Familiensprache zeigt sich ein positiver Zusammenhang zwischen einer längeren Kindertagesstättenbesuchsdauer und Deutschsprachfähigkeiten. Qualitätsmerkmale und die ethnische Komposition der Einrichtungen moderieren diesen Zusammenhang. Auch die Ausstattungsqualität der besuchten Grundschule ist positiv mit den Leseleistungen von türkischstämmigen Kinder in der dritten Klasse assoziiert."
Year 2006
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38 Project

Social Remittances and Migration (Sub-)Cultures in Contemporary Poland

Authors Anne White
Year 2016
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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41 Journal Article

Migration of Ukrainian Nationals to Portugal: The Visibility of a New Migration Landscape

Authors Sónia Pereira, Maria Lucinda Fonseca
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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42 Book Chapter

Where, What and Whom to Study? Principles, Guidelines and Empirical Examples of Case Selection and Sampling in Migration Research

Authors Karolina Barglowski
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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43 Book Chapter

The Temporary Nature of Ukrainian Migration: Definitions, Determinants and Consequences

Authors Marta Kindler, Agata Górny
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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45 Book Chapter

Migrasjon, foreldreskap og sosial kontroll

Authors Jon Horgen Friberg, Mathilde Bjørnset
Description
The topic of this report is parenting and social control, with a particular focus on immigrant families from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka. The empirical analyses fall into three parts: A quantitative analysis of attitudes to gender roles, sexuality and relationships in immigrant families and the scope of parental restrictions, as well as analyses of the driving forces and development of social control. We ask questions about the attitudes that are found in various groups with regard to issues of gender roles and sexuality among adolescents. Furthermore, we identify those who are most at risk of being subject to strict parental restrictions, and what kinds of consequences these may entail for the life of young people. A qualitative analysis of the parents’ subjective concerns with regard to raising children and adolescents in Norway, based on individual and group interviews with parents. Here, we will focus on the parents’ perspectives and their experiences of and grounds for the way in which they exercise social control. A qualitative analysis of complexity and social change in family relationships in a migration context, based on interviews with parents, adolescents and young adults, as well as professionals in the assistance services. Here, we focus on the experiences of the young people and relationships within families, with a special emphasis on mechanisms of social change. Quantitative analyses of attitudes and social control Based on the adolescents’ assessments of their parents’ attitudes, we find that the parental generation from countries such as Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka, as well as other immigrant groups from the global South, are far more conservative in issues concerning pre-marital sex, homosexuality and letting adolescents in upper secondary school age have boy-/girlfriends, when compared to the population in general. Attitudes to gender roles and sexuality are closely linked to religion—both the degree of religiosity and affiliation with specific religious communities have an effect. Muslim immigrants appear to be the most conservative, but other religious groups are also far more conservative in such issues than the general population. We also find major variations in attitudes between different groups among adolescents, but the young people tend to see themselves as considerably more liberal than their parents. A substantial minority within some immigrant groups reports what may be referred to as severe parental restrictions on their social life. For example, 29 per cent of all girls from a Pakistani background in the first year of upper secondary school in Oslo and Akershus report that it is very or fairly true that their parents object to them ‘being in the company of persons of the opposite gender in their leisure time with no adults present’. The degree of parental control is directly linked to the parents’ cultural orientation and degree of religious conviction. The more concerned the parents are to preserve the culture of their country of origin, the stronger the likelihood that the adolescents will be exposed to strict parental control. There is also a certain correlation with the parents’ socioeconomic status, but this effect is far weaker. Adolescents who receive good grades in school, however, tend to report fewer parental restrictions than peers with poorer school performance. Boys and girls tend to experience somewhat different forms of social control. While boys in fact more often report restrictions on being with friends, girls more frequently report that their parents object to them being with someone of the opposite gender without adult supervision. Among Muslims, girls report more parental restrictions than boys, whereas the opposite is the case in some other groups. We may assume that some boys have greater expectations regarding their own freedom and thus have a lower threshold for reporting parental restrictions. In addition, the qualitative interviews indicate that even though boys and girls may be subject to equally strict rules, violations made by girls are seen as far more serious. Adolescents who are born in Norway to immigrant parents are less exposed to parental restrictions than those who have immigrated themselves, and the degree of parental restrictions diminishes markedly in pace with increased length of residence in the family. This reduction in parental restrictions appears to also occur in families that retain a conservative attitude to adolescent gender roles and sexuality. The analyses indicate that parental restrictions have considerable consequences for the lives of young people. Reports of parental restrictions are associated with lower rates of participation in organised leisure activities and a higher likelihood of reporting mental afflictions and low self-esteem. Some young people appear to lead what may be termed ‘double lives’ in conflict with their parents’ wishes. For example, a considerable proportion of minority youths have a boy-/girlfriend, even though they believe that their parents would strongly disapprove of this. Parental perspectives on raising adolescents in a foreign culture In the second section of the empirical analyses we have attempted to give a voice to the generation of parents among immigrants from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka and their concerns linked to being a parent in Norway. We place special emphasis on older and relatively conservative parents, since they clearly articulate topics that to a greater or lesser extent are of concern for others as well. Many of the parents whom we interviewed report missing a larger social collective from which to seek support in raising children, and often feeling alone with the responsibility for the children. In their countries of origin, raising children tends to be more of a communal responsibility that involves the extended family, relatives and the local community, and where key norms are shared in all the different arenas that the children frequent. The loss of this community, the feeling of dissolution of family bonds and of being alone when facing a strange and foreign world were among the recurring topics in interviews with the parents. Some also express frustration over the fact that the children, in their opinion, fail to uphold the community norms that prevailed in their own youth. Individualism—often interpreted as egotism—and liberal attitudes to substance use and sexuality are perceived as especially threatening aspects of Norwegian society. In addition, some parents see that their traditional instruments for maintaining discipline and control, including corporal punishment, shared religious norms and support from the extended family, are unavailable here. Some therefore feel that they are unable to adequately exercise parental and social control. Some are also uncertain of what is considered acceptable in terms of setting boundaries for children in Norwegian society. Some parents feel that their religion, identity and culture are under pressure from the wider society. To some extent, this is a reflection of uncertainty and fear in the encounter with the unknown. However, this perception also reflects a real conflict between different ways of regulating social life: Should adolescents be regarded as citizens with independent rights and autonomy, or are their rights and duties primarily derived from their membership in a family collective with sovereign authority over its members? This conflict between a collectivist and religious family organisation on the one hand and secular-state individualism on the other is partly expressed in the form of an ambivalent relationship toward schools. Immigrant parents tend to have strongly positive attitudes to school and education, but in matters related to swimming lessons for boys and girls, summer camps, showering after PE classes etc. some parents feel that their wishes are being ignored. The state/family conflict emerges with particular clarity in the form of families’ fear of the child protection service, which some parents see as a constant threat and an invasion of the family’s sovereignty. The maintenance of traditional marriage institutions is perceived by many as the key to perpetuating family structure, faith and identity, and concern for the children’s future marriage is a main factor in the execution of social control. In the background lurks the fear of being sent to a nursing home, which for some is a symbol of the consequences should they fail to preserve traditional family structures. For some parents, there is thus a lot at stake in their parenting practices. There are major individual variations between different families and parents in all three groups with regard to the strength of these concerns. However, there are also systematic differences between the groups that are worth noting. The first difference concerns the ‘glue’ in the social networks that binds them together. Although the Pakistani, Somali and Tamil informants were all concerned with family dissolution as a result of migration, there were considerable differences with regard to their concrete social organisation. The Somali group stood out at one end of the scale, by having largely fragmented social networks and many families with dissolved family structures. As many as 6 out of 10 adolescents with a Somali background reported that they did not live with both parents together. The Tamil group with a background from Sri Lanka stood out at the other end, by having largely succeeded in reconstructing closely knit social networks that provide considerable support for individual families, organised within the framework of the Tamil diaspora movement. The second difference pertains to the perception of identity conflict. Some of the parents in both the Somali and Pakistani groups felt that, to some extent, their wish to perpetuate their cultural and religious identity conflicted with the intentions of the Norwegian state regarding their children. The Tamils were also concerned with preserving their own identity, but for them, this was a matter of language, rather than religion, and they far less frequently stated that this was antagonistic to their integration in the wider society. Inter-generational relations and social change The interviews with adolescents and young adults underscore the social complexity in relationships characterised by strong social control. Adolescents and parents are both part of networks and relationships in which many of the participants experience mutually incompatible demands and expectations—not only to their own lifestyle, but also in terms of how they should relate to that of others. It is thus not always so easy to identify those who exercise social control and those who are being controlled, since there are many—including parents, siblings and other relatives—who may feel that they are caught ‘between a rock and a hard place’, squeezed between the expectations of others. The way in which adolescents perceive being subject to strong social control will largely depend on their own attitudes and adaptations. For example, internalising the family’s expectations is one way to ensure avoidance of conflicts while being able to perceive autonomy and independence in daily life. Others choose to embrace a religious identity as a way to distance themselves from the family’s demands, while committing to a set of life rules that ensure acceptance and legitimacy. Some enter into conflict, in the form of breaking out and settling scores or fighting small everyday battles. Many live so-called ‘double lives’, shifting between varying expectations and demands in different arenas. However, one effect of such ‘double lives’ is that relationships become potentially vulnerable—the consequences are felt only when something ‘goes wrong’. Inter-generational conflicts in relationships characterised by strong social control cannot be understood only as value conflicts; they also take the form of negotiations, where various resources can be brought into the bargain. For many young people, however, conflicts of interest between different generations appear as internalised value conflicts, such as the parents’ concern regarding who will take care of them in their old age. We identify a number of social mechanisms that, over time, will bring about change in the direction of more liberal parenting practices. These are partly changes that follow from learning and adaptation, and partly changes that follow from conflicts. Over time, many families feel that their points of reference gradually change and the idealised images of the perfect family have a tendency to pale. In some communities, their notion of ‘scandal’ erodes, and the fear of what others might say loses some of its hold as time passes. Furthermore, many parents discover through trial and error that traditional authoritarian parenting styles function poorly in Norway. Many report that they have been ‘forced’ to change their methods in seeking to transfer their values to the children. In addition, we can see that the institutional frameworks in Norwegian society—which provide women and children with far better legal protection and access to resources—help give small and large internal family conflicts a different outcome than what would have been seen in the countries of origin. Increasing levels of education, especially among girls in the second generation, also help change the balance of power and the bargaining situation in ways that gradually change the rules of the game in the families. Religion plays an ambiguous role in these processes of change. Religion is the source of demands and restrictions related to gender segregation and chastity, and religious arguments lend weight and legitimacy to the execution of social control, with a conservative effect. At the same time, we can see that changes in family practices are accompanied by a more liberal and individualist interpretation of religion in the younger generation. For some, religiously based arguments may even provide a weighty case for liberation from the more culturally based expectations from the parents’ generation. The report is concluded with some reflections around the implications for policy-oriented work in this area.
Year 2019
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46 Report

The politics of ‘waiting’ for care: immigration policy and family reunification in Canada

Authors Danièle Bélanger, , Guillermo Candiz
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
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47 Journal Article

Alcohol Use among Very Early Adolescents in Vietnam: What Difference Does Parental Migration Make?

Authors Lucy P. Jordan, Elspeth Graham, Nguyen Duc Vinh
Year 2013
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
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49 Journal Article

Orphan pensioners and migrating grandparents: the impact of mass migration on older people in rural Albania

Authors RUSSELL KING, JULIE VULLNETARI
Year 2006
Journal Name AGEING & SOCIETY
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51 Journal Article

Transnational land and property disputes: the British-Bangladeshi experience

Authors Md Farid Miah
Year 2021
Journal Name Contemporary South Asia
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52 Journal Article

Governing protracted displacement: An analysis across global, regional and domestic contexts

Authors Nuno Ferreira, Carolien Jacobs, Pamela Kea, ...
Year 2020
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53 Working Paper

Orientamento professionale e placement dei cittadini di Paesi Terzi

Authors Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Federica De Carlo
Year 2020
Journal Name FORMAZIONE & INSEGNAMENTO. Rivista internazionale di Scienze dell'educazione e della formazione, 18(1), 418-426.
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54 Journal Article

Envisaging post-Brexit immobility: Polish migrants' care intentions concerning their elderly parents

Authors Agnieszka Radziwinowiczowna, Weronika Kloc-Nowak, Anna Rosinska
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Family Research
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55 Journal Article

Integration measures and labour market success of refugees and beneficiaries of subsidiary protection in Austria

Authors Roland Hosner, Irina Vana, Golschan Khun Jush
Description
Analysing the development of the labour market status of refugees in Austria represents a key field of research for integration policy. The survey on integration of refugees and beneficiaries of subsidiary protection in Austria, which was conducted as part of the FIMAS project, provides a socio-scientific dataset for the analysis of the status quo of labour market integration and integration processes of members of the target group in Austria. The project surveyed close to 1,200 refugees in five Austrian federal provinces. The survey was conducted through personal interviews between August 2016 and May 2017 in Vienna, Upper Austria, Salzburg, Styria and Tyrol. Target groups for the interviews were persons of working age (15-60) from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and the Russian Federation (mainly Chechnya), who had been granted refugee status or subsidiary protection in Austria in the preceding ten years.
Year 2020
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57 Report

What’s Driving Migrant Russian Physicians to Stay Permanently in Finland? A Life-Course Approach

Authors Driss Habti
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Finnish Studies
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58 Journal Article

“Kites” and “anchors”: The (im)mobility strategies of transnational Latin American families against the crisis in Spain

Authors Anastasia Bermudez, Laura Oso
Year 2019
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
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59 Journal Article

Revista Internacional de Estudios Migratorios (RIEM)

Description
La Revista Internacional de Estudios Migratorios (RIEM) / International Journal of Migration Studies es una revista científica de ámbito internacional que publica textos de carácter multidisciplinar principalmente centrados en el estudio y análisis de los fenómenos migratorios y las relaciones étnicas e interculturales. Es una revista interdisciplinaria creada para fomentar y difundir el estudio de todos los aspectos sociodemográficos, históricos, económicos, políticos, legislativos, antropológicos, etnográficos, educativos y geográficos de la movilidad humana. Pertenece al ámbito de las Ciencias Humanas y Sociales y es editada por el Centro de Estudios de las Migraciones y las Relaciones Interculturales (CEMyRI), ubicado en la Universidad de Almería, con el respaldo de la Secretaría General de Inmigración y Emigración y la Consejería de Economía y Conocimiento. Se aceptan para ser evaluados trabajos teóricos, de investigación empírica y de reflexión. El proceso de selección y revisión sigue los criterios de revisión por pares, anonimato y calidad. La publicación tiene un carácter electrónico, por lo que los artículos se irán publicando en su web de manera continuada, una vez hayan sido evaluados, revisados y aceptados por el Consejo Editorial.
Year 2019
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61 Data Set

Lowering Welfare Benefits: Intended and Unintended Consequences for Migrants and their Families [Denmark]

Authors Lars Højsgaard Andersen, Christian Dustmann, Rasmus Landersø
Year 2019
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63 Working Paper

Introduction: Migrant Experiences of Emotional and Material (In)Security: Post-Socialist Perspectives

Authors Rebecca Kay, Moya Flynn
Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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64 Journal Article

Ethnomorality of Care: Migrants and their Aging Parents

Authors Agnieszka Radziwinowiczówna, Anna Rosińska, Weronika Kloc-Nowak
Year 2018
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65 Book

Ethnomorality of Care: Migrants and their Aging Parents

Authors Agnieszka Radziwinowiczówna, Anna Rosińska, Weronika Kloc-Nowak
Year 2018
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68 Book

Omsorgsovertakelser og etniske minoriteter En gjennomgang av saker i fylkesnemnda

Authors Monica Five Aarset, Anja Bredal
Description
Rapporten bygger på et forskningsoppdrag fra Barne-, ungdoms- og familiedirektoratet (Bufdir) om barneverntjenestens og fylkesnemndas håndtering av saker om omsorgsovertakelse i familier med etnisk minoritetsbakgrunn. Datamaterialet har bestått av vedtak og saksmapper fra fylkesnemnda. Studien er ikke en fullstendig kartlegging av barneverntjenestens arbeid, men løfter frem noen mønstre og temaer som kan være utfordrende eller problematiske i barnevernets arbeid med etniske minoritetsfamilier. Blant annet pekes det på at barneverntjenestens økte fokus på vold mot barn, tilsier en styrket faglig diskusjon om voldsforståelser og en revurdering av barnevernets erkjennelsesparadigme.
Year 2018
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69 Report

Growing Up Multicultural: The Experiences of Children Raised by Polish-Norwegian Mixed Couples in Norway

Year 2017
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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70 Journal Article

International Family Migration and the Dual-Earner Model [Denmark]

Authors Martin D. Munk, Till Nikolka, Panu Poutvaara
Year 2017
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72 Working Paper

Families as a Collective Abuser. A Case of Family Violence Against Chech-en Refugee Women in Poland

Year 2017
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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73 Journal Article

Family Reunification of third-country nationals in the EU: National practices (country report Luxembourg)

Authors David Petry, Sarah Jacobs, Adolfo Sommarribas, ...
Description
In Luxembourg, family reunification is one of the main reasons for immigration of third-country nationals. In fact, “family member” and “private reasons (family links)” residence permits (first deliveries and renewals) represented more than a third of all residence permits issued during the last three years. While the right to family reunification was solely provided by international law and regulated by administrative practice until 2008, the transposition of Directive 2003/86/EC of 22 September 2003 on the right to family reunification led to a much more precise and detailed legal framework. A notable change in legislation has been proposed with the introduction of bill n° 6992 , namely the harmonisation of the conditions that apply to third-country national employees with those of Blue Card holders and researchers. Thus, family reunification requirements for certain categories of applicants shall be alleviated through the abrogation of the 12-month residence requirement for the sponsor. In order to apply for family reunification in Luxembourg, sponsors have to meet a number of requirements for exercising the right to family reunification, which include the provision of suitable accommodation for the size of their family; meeting health and safety standards; health insurance; as well as stable and regular resources to provide for themselves and their family members. As recommended by Directive 2003/86/EC, Luxembourg sets out more favourable conditions to beneficiaries of international protection for the exercise of their right to family reunification. Thus, they do not have to comply with the above-mentioned requirements in case they apply for family reunification within 3 months of being granted the status. Family members who have come to Luxembourg under family reunification have access to education, orientation, vocational training, lifelong learning and professional retraining once their residence permit has been issued. Family members furthermore have access to the labour market. In case the family member has resided in Luxembourg for less than one year when the application is submitted, it will be submitted to the labour market test. Family members can also, under a number of conditions, benefit from guaranteed minimum income, social aid, long-term residence status as well as citizenship. National stakeholders noted that the requirement of finding appropriate accommodation and proving stable and regular resources is one of the main challenges for sponsors. For family members as well as sponsors, having sufficient financial resources to cover the costs of family reunification can be another challenge to accessing family reunification. Family members of beneficiaries of international protection in particular face the more procedural challenge of providing proof of identity and family links, which can be difficult due to lacking documentation, differing administrative practices in the country of origin and/or the lack of cooperation of institutions. Gaining access to family reunification is also particularly difficult for beneficiaries of international protection who arrived in Luxembourg as unaccompanied minors but reached adulthood during the examination of their file, as they must provide proof of their family member’s dependency upon them. The limited number of diplomatic representations of Luxembourg abroad poses a challenge both to family members who must present themselves there, as well as for the Luxembourgish authorities who require information on certain countries. Perceived as a best practice with regard to family reunification are the information that NGOs and the lawyers in the field of migration and asylum provide to beneficiaries of international protection with regard to procedures of family reunification, thereby contributing to the beneficiary’s ability to enter an application for family reunification within the 3-month period. The practice of accepting the submission of an application of family members of beneficiaries of international protection that contains only a commencement of proof of family links and allowing for the finalisation at a later date is also perceived as a good practice, as it enables them to exercise their right to family reunification while benefitting from more favourable conditions. Furthermore, the issuance of a “laisser-passer” for beneficiaries of international protection who cannot obtain travel documents is perceived as a big step forward by national stakeholders. Lastly, Restoring Family Links, a service provided by the Luxembourgish Red Cross, is also considered a reliable tool with regard to tracing missing family members abroad.
Year 2017
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74 Report

Special Issue: Gender, Development and Resistance in South Asia

Authors Tiina Seppälä
Year 2016
Journal Name Refugee Watch: A South Asian Journal on Forced Migration
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75 Journal Article

Redes sociales y vida familiar entre las migrantes cualificadas

Authors Fernando Osvaldo Esteban
Year 2016
Book Title Mujeres en riesgo de exclusión social: una perspectiva transnacional
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76 Book Chapter

DZIECI POLSKICH IMIGRANTÓW W NORWEGII. KWESTIE ADAPTACYJNE I TOŻSAMOŚCIOWE

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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78 Journal Article

Kapitał rodziny i rodzinności w przestrzeni transnarodowej. Na przykładzie badań polskich rodzin w Norwegii

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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79 Journal Article

Introduction. Family Migration as an Integration Issue? Policy Perspectives and Academic Insights .

Authors Saskia Bonjour, Albert Kraler
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Family Issues
Citations (WoS) 21
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81 Journal Article

Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey in Four European Countries (CILS4EU)

Description
The study is a panel survey designed to study the complex causal mechanism of structural, social, and cultural integration of adolescents with migration background. The data of two waves are currently available. The data set includes surveys of students, parents, and teachers. It enables studying processes of intergenerational transmission and integration. Topics covered in the survey include cognitive-cultural integration, structural integration, social integration, emotional-cultural integration, and health and wellbeing. In addition there is detailed information about migration experience and demographics.
Year 2015
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83 Data Set

Virtual Transnationalism: Polish Migrant Families and New Technologies

Year 2015
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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84 Journal Article

Spatialities of Work and Home in a Dual-Career Context of Highly Skilled Arab Women in Finland

Authors Driss Habti
Year 2014
Journal Name Journal of Finnish Studies
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85 Journal Article

2000 Families: identifying the research potential of an origins-of migration study [Europe, Turkey]

Authors Ayse Guveli, Harry Ganzeboom, Helen Baykara-Krumme, ...
Year 2014
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92 Working Paper

Child-centred narratives of Polish mothers: cross-generational identity constructions abroad

Year 2014
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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93 Journal Article

Demograficzne i społeczne aspekty poakcesyjnych migracji rodzin

Year 2014
Book Title Decade of Poland's membership in the EU. Social consequences of Polish emigration after 2004
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95 Book Chapter

Family Migration and Relative Earnings Potentials [Denmark]

Authors Mette Foged
Year 2014
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96 Working Paper

Mother’s Land and Others’ Land: “Stolen” Youth of Returned Female Migrants

Authors A.K.M. Ahsan Ullah
Year 2013
Journal Name Gender, Technology, and Development
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97 Journal Article
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