Migrant aspirations and attitudes

Aspirations to migrate arise from the differential between current and aspired life satisfaction, aspirations to live in a certain country, and the intrinsic motivation to migrate, influenced by an individual’s personality traits.

Studies listed under this migration driver refer to aspiration, human agency, intrinsic motivation to migrate, migration intentions, migration motivation, beliefs, and personality traits.

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Return home? Determinants of return migration intention amongst Turkish immigrants in Germany

Authors Tolga Tezcan
Year 2019
Journal Name Geoforum
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1 Journal Article

Determinants and policies of native metropolitan young workers' migration toward non-metropolitan areas in Japan

Authors Masahiro Taima, Yasushi Asami
Year 2020
Journal Name CITIES
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2 Journal Article

Individual versus Household Migration Decision Rules: Gender and Marital Status Differences in Intentions to Migrate in South Africa

Authors Bina Gubhaju, Gordon F. De Jong
Year 2009
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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3 Journal Article

When “Inclusion” Means “Exclusion”: Discourses on the Eviction and Repatriations of Roma Migrants, at National and European Union Level

Authors Dragos Ciulinaru
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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4 Journal Article

Introduction

Authors Zana Vathi
Book Title Migrating and Settling in a Mobile World
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5 Book Chapter

The nation-family: Intimate encounters and genealogical perversion in Armenia

Authors TAMAR SHIRINIAN
Year 2018
Journal Name American Ethnologist
Citations (WoS) 2
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6 Journal Article

The Integration of Immigrants in Northern Sweden: A Case Study of the Municipality of Strömsund

Authors Anita Cvetkovic
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration
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7 Journal Article

Democracy in private government (a case study of the International Typographical Union)

Authors Seymour M. Lipset
Year 2010
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
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8 Journal Article

Qualitative Migration Research: Viable Goals, Open-Ended Questions, and Multidimensional Answers

Authors Ewa Morawska
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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9 Book Chapter

The Concept of Integration as an Analytical Tool and as a Policy Concept

Authors Blanca Garcés-Mascareñas, Rinus Penninx
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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10 Book Chapter

Power and Counter Power in Europe. The Transnational Structuring of Social Spaces and Social Fields

Authors Susanne Pernicka, Christian Lahusen
Year 2018
Journal Name Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie
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11 Journal Article

Old Habits Die Hard? Lingering Son Preference in an Era of Normalizing Sex Ratios at Birth in South Korea

Authors Sam Hyun Yoo, Sarah R. Hayford, Victor Agadjanian
Year 2017
Journal Name Population Research and Policy Review
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12 Journal Article

Parental Well-being Surrounding First Birth as a Determinant of Further Parity Progression

Authors Rachel Margolis, Mikko Myrskylä
Year 2015
Journal Name Demography
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13 Journal Article

Seeing slavery in seafood supply chains

Authors Katrina Nakamura, Ganapathiraju Pramod, Lori Bishop, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name SCIENCE ADVANCES
Citations (WoS) 2
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14 Journal Article

International winter tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden: understanding migration, lifestyle, and business motivations

Authors Doris Anna Carson, Marco Eimermann, Dean B. Carson
Year 2018
Journal Name Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism
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15 Journal Article

EUmagine

Description
EUMAGINE is a collaborative European research project aimed at investigating the impact of perceptions of human rights and democracy on migration aspirations and decisions. Project description The EUMAGINE project aims to study how Europe is perceived from outside the EU, and how these perceptions affect migration aspirations and decisions. The project focuses on how people’s perceptions on democracy and human rights – in relation to their regions and countries of origin as well as places abroad – affect their perceptions on and attitudes to migration. We are also interested in investigating how perceptions on human rights and democracy interact with other determinants of migration aspirations, to what extent migration is perceived as a valuable life project, and how potential migrants compare Europe to other migration destinations. EUMAGINE studies migration-related perceptions among people aged 18-39 in four countries of origin and transit: Morocco, Senegal, Turkey and Ukraine. Conceptual framework The theoretical starting point for the project is two-fold: First, we assume that different types of discourses on human rights and democracy influence how individuals in countries of origin and transit perceive issues of human rights and democracy. Secondly, we expect that individuals’ perceptions in turn influence their migratory aspirations and decisions. The EUMAGINE project explores two types of imaginations: “migratory imaginations” and “geographical imaginations.” The term “migratory imaginations” refers to people’s attitude to migration as a valuable life project. Migration-related perceptions and aspirations develop within a specific cultural, political-juridical and economic setting, known as the “emigration environment.” Migration aspirations are linked with socially and culturally constructed perceptions. These include ideas and meanings attached to the migration project, subjective images of one’s current environment, and thoughts about potential destinations. We assume that perceptions on human rights and democracy have an impact on what Massey (1998) has termed “cultures of emigration,” where migration becomes deeply rooted into people’s behavioral repertoires. By “geographical imaginations” we refer to the meanings and images that make up people’s subjective conception of particular places, including Europe. We assume that migratory and geographical imaginations are influenced by different types of discourses: macro-level discourses (e.g. from policy and media sources) and meso-level discourses, (e.g. disseminated through popular culture and social networks). We also expect migratory and geographical imaginations to be shaped by individual-level factors, such as gender or age. Research questions The project is informed by five overarching research questions: 1) How are human rights and democracy related to imaginations in migrant sending countries constructed? 2) How are perceptions on human rights, democracy, migration and possible destination countries affected by various factors? 3) How do perceptions on human rights and democracy and ‘geographical imaginations’ relate to migration aspirations and migration? 4) How to develop a better informed migration policy, taking into account human rights and democracy as important migration determinants? 5) How to contribute to local capacity building in source countries, in order to prepare the ground for locally based research initiatives in the future? Methodology The project systematically analyzes migration aspirations and decisions, following a case-study approach: it compares and contrasts a diversity of important international emigration countries; various types of regions within these countries; several modes of migration; various types of influential discourses; and different profiles of potential migrants. This allows the project to make analytical generalizations about how migration-related perceptions, aspirations and decisions are formed. EUMAGINE has a multidisciplinary approach and combines the varied disciplinary background of its researchers: sociology, law, anthropology, economics, human geography and political science. The field research follows a mixed-method approach with three main methodological components: 1) ethnographic fieldwork in the community, 2) a large-scale quantitative survey, and 3) semi-structured qualitative interviews with selected survey respondents, directed by an interview guide. The research uses between- as well as within-method triangulation. Between-method triangulation is reached through combining qualitative as well as quantitative research methodologies. For within-method triangulation, we use two types of qualitative research, namely in-depth interviews and observation in communities. In each country, fieldwork is undertaken in four diverse regions, selected on the basis of the following model: 1) An area characterized by high emigration rates; 2) A second, comparable socio-economic area with low emigration; 3) A comparable area with a strong immigration history; and 4) A location with a specific human rights situation.
Year 2011
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16 Project

Migration, Motherhood, Marriage: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of North American Immigrant Mothers in Israel

Authors Laura I. Sigad, Rivka A. Eisikovits
Year 2009
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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17 Journal Article

Migration, Motherhood, Marriage: Cross-Cultural Adaptation of North American Immigrant Mothers in Israel

Authors Laura I. Sigad, Rivka A. Eisikovits
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration
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18 Journal Article

Intergenerational Transmission of Ethnic Identity, Integration and Transnational Ties

Authors Zana Vathi
Book Title Migrating and Settling in a Mobile World
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19 Book Chapter

Responsibility vs. Dissociation

Authors Julia Dahlvik
Book Title Inside Asylum Bureaucracy: Organizing Refugee Status Determination in Austria
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20 Book Chapter

Protest Against the Reception of Asylum Seekers in Austria

Authors Sieglinde Rosenberger, Miriam Haselbacher
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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21 Book Chapter

Cities’ Policies: the Work of European Cities to Counter Muslim Radicalisation

Authors Anja van Heelsum, Floris Vermeulen
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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22 Journal Article

When Do Migration Aspirations Materialize?

Principal investigator Daniel Auer (Principal Investigator), Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator), Friederike Römer (Principal Investigator), Jasper Tjaden (Principal Investigator)
Description
"(1) Aspirations: In the absence of reliable, internationally available migration flow data necessary for statistical forecasting, policymakers increasingly turn to survey data on emigration intentions to evaluate future migration trends. The important assumption – i.e. that there is a measurable and systematic relationship between the intention to migrate and actual migration – has not been firmly established at the international level. In a first step, we examine the association between estimated population averages of emigration intentions and official migration flow data based on data for more than 160 countries. First results show a strong association between emigration intentions and recorded bilateral flows to industrialized countries, as well as between intentions and aggregated out-migration. The results provide policymakers with a reliability assessment of survey data on emigration intentions and encourage future attempts to incorporate survey data in formal statistical migration forecasting models. (2) Policies: Furthermore, we want to explore to what extent migrants consciously decide to migrate to countries that allow them to improve their economic situation taking into account the difficulties to migrate to this country. In particular, we would like to know how the difficulty to immigrate into a country prevents potential migrants from moving to this country. Might it be that migrants decide to move to more liberal countries to increase the chances to be accepted? We already know that migration flows increase when the destination country is economically more attractive (Borjas 1989; Hatton and Williamson 2003) and decrease when immigration policies are more restrictive (Helbling and Leblang 2018). These effects are to some extent due to rejections during the migration processes when for example visa applications are declined or people are not allowed to enter a country when they arrive at the border. (3) Corruption: Eventually, besides immigration policies in potential destination countries, the formation and subsequent materialization of migration aspirations is determined by various factors in the country of residence. However, there is surprisingly little empirical evidence on factors outside the pure economic sphere. For instance, the link between corruption and emigration has received growing attention. Until now, the evidence claiming a strong relationship relies on individual case studies and correlational analysis which severely limits generalizability. In our study, we apply quasi-experimental methods including instrumental variables and propensity score matching to global survey data on 130 countries over 6 years, covering almost 600’000 individual respondents. We find support for the notion that corruption – systematically and strongly - induces emigration plans across countries, across various model specifications and estimation methods. Strengthening causal claims about the link between corruption and emigration is important for further research in this field. Results are also relevant for policy-makers exploring options to address irregular migration in the context of development and trade agreements. "
Year 2018
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23 Project

Nouvelles perspectives sur les migrations dans et depuis la région de Kayes

Principal investigator Nehara Feldman (Coordinator), Stéphanie Lima (Investigator), Sandrine Mesplé-Somps (Investigator)
Description
L’objectif du projet NIMIK est d’identifier l’émergence de nouveaux phénomènes migratoires à partir d’enquêtes sur la région de Kayes. La mobilité vers d’autres pays d’Afrique et d’autres destinations, notamment l’Europe, depuis cette région a fait l’objet de nombreux travaux dont il s’agira de faire un bilan critique. Ces travaux permettent d’approcher les phénomènes migratoires avec une profondeur historique particulière, et on s’attachera à déceler à partir de ce terrain singulier les changements en cours. Sur une durée de deux ans, le projet réunit une équipe d’une dizaine de chercheuses et de chercheurs, économistes, statisticiens, géographes, sociologistes et anthropologues, basés en France et au Mali. La pluridisciplinarité permettra de réfléchir à l’articulation des motivations sociales, économiques, politiques et climatiques dans les projets de départ et, éventuellement, de retours. Le projet NIMIK est structuré autour de trois thèmes. Le premier coordonné par Sandrine Mesplé-Somps (IRD, UMR DIAL), a pour objet de dresser un bilan de la dynamique actuelle des migrations au Mali, notamment en matière de genre et d’étudier les aspirations nouvelles à migrer. Avec notamment l’appui de Björn Nilsson (économiste, post-doc), cet axe mobilisera des enquêtes statistiques existantes et mettra en place une enquête originale auprès de jeunes maliens sur leurs aspirations au départ. Le deuxième est coordonné par Nehara Feldman (anthropologue, Université de Picardie) associée à Aïssatou Mbodj-Pouye (anthropologue, CNRS IMAF, Paris et Point Sud, Bamako) et Joanne Le Bars (géographe, post-doc) ; il examinera les dynamiques familiales liées à la migration et s’intéressera à l’émergence possible de nouvelles configurations migratoires, notamment la migration autonome des femmes. Le troisième, coordonné par Stéphanie Lima (LMI Movida et Université de Toulouse) et auquel est associée Hawa Coulibaly (géographe, post-doc, LMI MACOTER et UMR CESSMA), étudie les interrelations entre les migrations internationales et la gouvernance locale dans la région de Kayes. Outre les trois post-doctorants cités, seront impliqués dans le projet un doctorant du LMI MACOTER, deux étudiants boursiers de Point Sud, Bamako, Mariam Sissoko et Mbaré Fofana et une étudiante en master de l’Université de Picardie, Nassima Guilal.
Year 2018
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24 Project

Emigration Rates From Sample Surveys: An Application to Senegal

Authors Frans Willekens, Sabine Zinn, Matthias Leuchter
Year 2017
Journal Name Demography
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25 Journal Article

Assimilation of Foreigners in Former West Germany

Authors Peter V. Schaeffer, James O. Bukenya
Year 2014
Journal Name International Migration
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26 Journal Article

Deciding to Cross: Norms and Economics of Unauthorized Migration

Authors Emily Ryo
Year 2013
Journal Name American Sociological Review
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27 Journal Article

The Educational Expectations of Children of Immigrants in Italy

Authors Alesandra Minelo, Nicola Barban
Year 2012
Journal Name The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
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28 Journal Article

The class route to nationhood: China, Vietnam, Norway, Cyprus - and France

Authors Stein Tonnesson
Year 2009
Journal Name Nations and Nationalism
Citations (WoS) 4
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29 Journal Article

Gender and Migration: West Indians in Comparative Perspective

Authors Nancy Foner
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration
Citations (WoS) 19
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30 Journal Article

Crime, policing and social order: on the expressive nature of public confidence in policing

Authors Jonathan Jackson, Ben Bradford
Year 2009
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
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31 Journal Article

Conclusion

Authors Joëlle Moret
Book Title European Somalis' Post-Migration Movements
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32 Book Chapter

Methodological and Ethical Dilemmas in Research Among Smuggled Migrants

Authors Veronika Bilger, Ilse van Liempt
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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33 Book Chapter

Protests Revisited: Political Configurations, Political Culture and Protest Impact

Authors Helen Schwenken, Gianni D’Amato
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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35 Book Chapter

Research-Policy Dialogues in the United Kingdom

Authors Christina Boswell, Alistair Hunter
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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36 Book Chapter

Mobility: A Practice or a Capital?

Authors Joëlle Moret
Book Title European Somalis' Post-Migration Movements
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37 Book Chapter

Regulating Movement of the Very Mobile: Selected Legal and Policy Aspects of Ukrainian Migration to EU Countries

Authors Monika Szulecka
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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39 Book Chapter

Ukrainian Migration to Poland: A “Local” Mobility?

Authors Marta Kindler, Zuzanna Brunarska, Monika Szulecka, ...
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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40 Book Chapter

A Crisis-Driven Migration? Aspirations and Experiences of the Post-2008 South European Migrants in London

Authors Manolis Pratsinakis, Russell King, Carmen Leon Himmelstine, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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41 Journal Article

The limits of freedom: migration as a space of freedom and loneliness among Afghan unaccompanied migrant youth

Authors Francesca Meloni
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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42 Journal Article

Key Knowledge Questions on Migration Drivers

Authors Katharina Natter
Year 2020
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43 Policy Brief

Do Migrants Think Differently? Evidence from Eastern European and Post-Soviet States

Authors Ruxanda Berlinschi, Ani Harutyunyan
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration Review
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44 Journal Article

Using Internet search data to examine the relationship between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS sentiment in U.S. counties

Authors Christopher A. Bail, Friedolin Merhout, Peng Ding
Year 2018
Journal Name SCIENCE ADVANCES
Citations (WoS) 1
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45 Journal Article

Motivations and Constraints of Moving Abroad for Indian Students

Authors Metka Hercog, Mindel van de Laar
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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46 Journal Article

Life satisfaction of immigrants: does cultural assimilation matter?

Authors Viola Angelini, Luca Corazzini, Laura Casi
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Population Economics
Citations (WoS) 18
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47 Journal Article

The Impact of Parental Death on Child Well-being: Evidence From the Indian Ocean Tsunami

Authors Ava Gail Cas, Duncan Thomas, Wayan Suriastini, ...
Year 2014
Journal Name Demography
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48 Journal Article

Internal consistency of demographic assumptions in the shared socioeconomic pathways

Authors Leiwen Jiang
Year 2014
Journal Name Population and Environment
Citations (WoS) 11
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49 Journal Article

Push/Pull Factors, Networks and Student Migration from Côte d’Ivoire to France and Switzerland

Authors Franck Dago, Simon Barussaud
Year 2021
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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50 Journal Article

Mobile sociology1

Authors John Urry
Year 2010
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 34
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51 Journal Article

Research-Policy Dialogues in the Netherlands

Authors Han Entzinger, Stijn Verbeek, Peter Scholten
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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52 Book Chapter

Poland’s Perspective on the Intra-European Movement of Poles. Implications and Governance Responses

Authors Marta Kindler
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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53 Book Chapter

Research-Policy Dialogues on Migrant Integration in Europe: Comparison and Conclusions

Authors Han Entzinger, Peter Scholten, Rinus Penninx
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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54 Book Chapter

Introduction

Authors Julia Dahlvik
Book Title Inside Asylum Bureaucracy: Organizing Refugee Status Determination in Austria
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55 Book Chapter

The Temporary Nature of Ukrainian Migration: Definitions, Determinants and Consequences

Authors Marta Kindler, Agata Górny
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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56 Book Chapter

EU Migration and the Economic Crisis: Concepts and Issues

Authors Mikolaj Stanek, Jean-Michel Lafleur
Book Title South-North Migration of EU Citizens in Times of Crisis
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57 Book Chapter

Discourse and Migration

Authors Teun A. van Dijk
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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58 Book Chapter

Research-Policy Dialogues in Denmark

Authors Martin Bak Jørgensen
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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59 Book Chapter

Conclusions and Reflection

Authors Peter Scholten, Mark van Ostaijen
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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60 Book Chapter

Constrained urban aspirations: Development, structural precarity and inequalities within Thai migration

Authors Gregory Gullette
Year 2019
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
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61 Journal Article

Determinants of Psycho-Social Adaptation in the Spanish Second Generation: A Fixed-Effects Analysis

Authors Erik R. Vickstrom, Alejandro Portes
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration Review
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62 Journal Article

Immigration, Integration und Einbürgerung: Neuzuwanderer, Policy Entscheidungen und Reaktionen von StaatsbürgerInnen

Principal investigator Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator ), Richard Traunmüller (Principal Investigator )
Description
Die Art und Weise wie Migrationsströme und die Integration vonMigranten reguliert werden ist zu einem zentralen Gegenstandöffentlicher und akademischer Debatten geworden. Während es vielForschung zur Frage gibt wie viele Migranten in ein Land gelassenwerden sollen, wissen wir noch relativ wenig darüber wie spezifischeRegulierungen von BürgerInnen wahrgenommen werden und wie sichdiese Regulierungen auf ihre Einstellungen und ihr Verhalten undschlussendlich auf die Akzeptanz von Immigranten auswirken. Zieldieses Projekts ist es, evidenzbasierte Antworten auf folgende Fragezu finden: Was sind die Folgen von Immigrations-, Integrations- undEinbürgerungspolitik auf die Einstellungen und das Verhaltengegenüber Immigranten. Um Antworten auf diese Fragen zu finden,werden zwei Umfragen mit verschiedenen Umfrageexperimenten in Deutschland durchgeführt. Die Experimente erlauben uns, denkausalen Einfluss von Policies auf Einstellungen und Verhalten insystematischerer Weise zu untersuchen. Um diese Policyeffektegenauer zu untersuchen, werden die befragten Personen mitUmfragevignetten konfrontiert. Um die rationalen Interessen vonBürgerInnen besser zu verstehen, werden die Policyeinflüsse inAbhängigkeit der Akzeptanz zu diesen Regulierungen gemessen.Darüber hinaus untersuchen wir, ob diese Effekte davon beeinflusstwerden, ob sich durch die Regulierungen der Status Quo für diebefragten BürgerInnen verändert.
Year 2019
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64 Project

Migrasjon, foreldreskap og sosial kontroll

Authors Jon Horgen Friberg, Mathilde Bjørnset
Description
The topic of this report is parenting and social control, with a particular focus on immigrant families from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka. The empirical analyses fall into three parts: A quantitative analysis of attitudes to gender roles, sexuality and relationships in immigrant families and the scope of parental restrictions, as well as analyses of the driving forces and development of social control. We ask questions about the attitudes that are found in various groups with regard to issues of gender roles and sexuality among adolescents. Furthermore, we identify those who are most at risk of being subject to strict parental restrictions, and what kinds of consequences these may entail for the life of young people. A qualitative analysis of the parents’ subjective concerns with regard to raising children and adolescents in Norway, based on individual and group interviews with parents. Here, we will focus on the parents’ perspectives and their experiences of and grounds for the way in which they exercise social control. A qualitative analysis of complexity and social change in family relationships in a migration context, based on interviews with parents, adolescents and young adults, as well as professionals in the assistance services. Here, we focus on the experiences of the young people and relationships within families, with a special emphasis on mechanisms of social change. Quantitative analyses of attitudes and social control Based on the adolescents’ assessments of their parents’ attitudes, we find that the parental generation from countries such as Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka, as well as other immigrant groups from the global South, are far more conservative in issues concerning pre-marital sex, homosexuality and letting adolescents in upper secondary school age have boy-/girlfriends, when compared to the population in general. Attitudes to gender roles and sexuality are closely linked to religion—both the degree of religiosity and affiliation with specific religious communities have an effect. Muslim immigrants appear to be the most conservative, but other religious groups are also far more conservative in such issues than the general population. We also find major variations in attitudes between different groups among adolescents, but the young people tend to see themselves as considerably more liberal than their parents. A substantial minority within some immigrant groups reports what may be referred to as severe parental restrictions on their social life. For example, 29 per cent of all girls from a Pakistani background in the first year of upper secondary school in Oslo and Akershus report that it is very or fairly true that their parents object to them ‘being in the company of persons of the opposite gender in their leisure time with no adults present’. The degree of parental control is directly linked to the parents’ cultural orientation and degree of religious conviction. The more concerned the parents are to preserve the culture of their country of origin, the stronger the likelihood that the adolescents will be exposed to strict parental control. There is also a certain correlation with the parents’ socioeconomic status, but this effect is far weaker. Adolescents who receive good grades in school, however, tend to report fewer parental restrictions than peers with poorer school performance. Boys and girls tend to experience somewhat different forms of social control. While boys in fact more often report restrictions on being with friends, girls more frequently report that their parents object to them being with someone of the opposite gender without adult supervision. Among Muslims, girls report more parental restrictions than boys, whereas the opposite is the case in some other groups. We may assume that some boys have greater expectations regarding their own freedom and thus have a lower threshold for reporting parental restrictions. In addition, the qualitative interviews indicate that even though boys and girls may be subject to equally strict rules, violations made by girls are seen as far more serious. Adolescents who are born in Norway to immigrant parents are less exposed to parental restrictions than those who have immigrated themselves, and the degree of parental restrictions diminishes markedly in pace with increased length of residence in the family. This reduction in parental restrictions appears to also occur in families that retain a conservative attitude to adolescent gender roles and sexuality. The analyses indicate that parental restrictions have considerable consequences for the lives of young people. Reports of parental restrictions are associated with lower rates of participation in organised leisure activities and a higher likelihood of reporting mental afflictions and low self-esteem. Some young people appear to lead what may be termed ‘double lives’ in conflict with their parents’ wishes. For example, a considerable proportion of minority youths have a boy-/girlfriend, even though they believe that their parents would strongly disapprove of this. Parental perspectives on raising adolescents in a foreign culture In the second section of the empirical analyses we have attempted to give a voice to the generation of parents among immigrants from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka and their concerns linked to being a parent in Norway. We place special emphasis on older and relatively conservative parents, since they clearly articulate topics that to a greater or lesser extent are of concern for others as well. Many of the parents whom we interviewed report missing a larger social collective from which to seek support in raising children, and often feeling alone with the responsibility for the children. In their countries of origin, raising children tends to be more of a communal responsibility that involves the extended family, relatives and the local community, and where key norms are shared in all the different arenas that the children frequent. The loss of this community, the feeling of dissolution of family bonds and of being alone when facing a strange and foreign world were among the recurring topics in interviews with the parents. Some also express frustration over the fact that the children, in their opinion, fail to uphold the community norms that prevailed in their own youth. Individualism—often interpreted as egotism—and liberal attitudes to substance use and sexuality are perceived as especially threatening aspects of Norwegian society. In addition, some parents see that their traditional instruments for maintaining discipline and control, including corporal punishment, shared religious norms and support from the extended family, are unavailable here. Some therefore feel that they are unable to adequately exercise parental and social control. Some are also uncertain of what is considered acceptable in terms of setting boundaries for children in Norwegian society. Some parents feel that their religion, identity and culture are under pressure from the wider society. To some extent, this is a reflection of uncertainty and fear in the encounter with the unknown. However, this perception also reflects a real conflict between different ways of regulating social life: Should adolescents be regarded as citizens with independent rights and autonomy, or are their rights and duties primarily derived from their membership in a family collective with sovereign authority over its members? This conflict between a collectivist and religious family organisation on the one hand and secular-state individualism on the other is partly expressed in the form of an ambivalent relationship toward schools. Immigrant parents tend to have strongly positive attitudes to school and education, but in matters related to swimming lessons for boys and girls, summer camps, showering after PE classes etc. some parents feel that their wishes are being ignored. The state/family conflict emerges with particular clarity in the form of families’ fear of the child protection service, which some parents see as a constant threat and an invasion of the family’s sovereignty. The maintenance of traditional marriage institutions is perceived by many as the key to perpetuating family structure, faith and identity, and concern for the children’s future marriage is a main factor in the execution of social control. In the background lurks the fear of being sent to a nursing home, which for some is a symbol of the consequences should they fail to preserve traditional family structures. For some parents, there is thus a lot at stake in their parenting practices. There are major individual variations between different families and parents in all three groups with regard to the strength of these concerns. However, there are also systematic differences between the groups that are worth noting. The first difference concerns the ‘glue’ in the social networks that binds them together. Although the Pakistani, Somali and Tamil informants were all concerned with family dissolution as a result of migration, there were considerable differences with regard to their concrete social organisation. The Somali group stood out at one end of the scale, by having largely fragmented social networks and many families with dissolved family structures. As many as 6 out of 10 adolescents with a Somali background reported that they did not live with both parents together. The Tamil group with a background from Sri Lanka stood out at the other end, by having largely succeeded in reconstructing closely knit social networks that provide considerable support for individual families, organised within the framework of the Tamil diaspora movement. The second difference pertains to the perception of identity conflict. Some of the parents in both the Somali and Pakistani groups felt that, to some extent, their wish to perpetuate their cultural and religious identity conflicted with the intentions of the Norwegian state regarding their children. The Tamils were also concerned with preserving their own identity, but for them, this was a matter of language, rather than religion, and they far less frequently stated that this was antagonistic to their integration in the wider society. Inter-generational relations and social change The interviews with adolescents and young adults underscore the social complexity in relationships characterised by strong social control. Adolescents and parents are both part of networks and relationships in which many of the participants experience mutually incompatible demands and expectations—not only to their own lifestyle, but also in terms of how they should relate to that of others. It is thus not always so easy to identify those who exercise social control and those who are being controlled, since there are many—including parents, siblings and other relatives—who may feel that they are caught ‘between a rock and a hard place’, squeezed between the expectations of others. The way in which adolescents perceive being subject to strong social control will largely depend on their own attitudes and adaptations. For example, internalising the family’s expectations is one way to ensure avoidance of conflicts while being able to perceive autonomy and independence in daily life. Others choose to embrace a religious identity as a way to distance themselves from the family’s demands, while committing to a set of life rules that ensure acceptance and legitimacy. Some enter into conflict, in the form of breaking out and settling scores or fighting small everyday battles. Many live so-called ‘double lives’, shifting between varying expectations and demands in different arenas. However, one effect of such ‘double lives’ is that relationships become potentially vulnerable—the consequences are felt only when something ‘goes wrong’. Inter-generational conflicts in relationships characterised by strong social control cannot be understood only as value conflicts; they also take the form of negotiations, where various resources can be brought into the bargain. For many young people, however, conflicts of interest between different generations appear as internalised value conflicts, such as the parents’ concern regarding who will take care of them in their old age. We identify a number of social mechanisms that, over time, will bring about change in the direction of more liberal parenting practices. These are partly changes that follow from learning and adaptation, and partly changes that follow from conflicts. Over time, many families feel that their points of reference gradually change and the idealised images of the perfect family have a tendency to pale. In some communities, their notion of ‘scandal’ erodes, and the fear of what others might say loses some of its hold as time passes. Furthermore, many parents discover through trial and error that traditional authoritarian parenting styles function poorly in Norway. Many report that they have been ‘forced’ to change their methods in seeking to transfer their values to the children. In addition, we can see that the institutional frameworks in Norwegian society—which provide women and children with far better legal protection and access to resources—help give small and large internal family conflicts a different outcome than what would have been seen in the countries of origin. Increasing levels of education, especially among girls in the second generation, also help change the balance of power and the bargaining situation in ways that gradually change the rules of the game in the families. Religion plays an ambiguous role in these processes of change. Religion is the source of demands and restrictions related to gender segregation and chastity, and religious arguments lend weight and legitimacy to the execution of social control, with a conservative effect. At the same time, we can see that changes in family practices are accompanied by a more liberal and individualist interpretation of religion in the younger generation. For some, religiously based arguments may even provide a weighty case for liberation from the more culturally based expectations from the parents’ generation. The report is concluded with some reflections around the implications for policy-oriented work in this area.
Year 2019
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65 Report

Stuck Between Mainstreaming and Localism: Views on the Practice of Migrant Integration in a Devolved Policy Framework

Authors Silvia Galandini, Silvia Galandini, Gareth Mulvey, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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66 Journal Article

Temporary Migration Programmes: the Cause or Antidote of Migrant Worker Exploitation in UK Agriculture

Authors Erica Consterdine, Sahizer Samuk
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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67 Journal Article

Partnerschaftsbildung im Kontext von Migration: Determinanten und Konsequenzen

Principal investigator Irena Kogan (Principal Investigator)
Description
Das Projekt untersucht den Prozess der Partnerschaftsbildung von neu angekommenen (männlichen) Einwanderern im Kontext ungleicher Geschlechterverteilung und ausgeprägter kultureller und sozialer Distanz der Neuankömmlinge zur autochthonen Mehrheitsbevölkerung der Gastländer. Dabei bezieht es beide Perspektiven ein, d. h. es wird das Zusammenspiel zwischen (subjektiven) Einstellungen in der Mehrheitsbevölkerung der Aufnahmegesellschaft und den individuellen Präferenzen und Einschränkungen der Einwanderer untersucht. Da transnationale Ehen bei Zuwanderern, insbesondere Muslimen, häufig vorkommen, ist diese Art der Partnerwahl für das Projekt von besonderem Interesse. Auf Basis vorhandener Daten zu früheren Migrantenkohorten sollen die Integrationsaussichten von Zuwanderern, ihren Partnern und deren Nachkommen in transnationalen, intraethnischen und interethnischen Ehen in der strukturellen, sozialen und kulturellen Dimension verglichen werden.
Year 2018
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68 Project

Ethno-nationalist populism and the mobilization of collective resentment

Authors Bart Bonikowski
Year 2017
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 27
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70 Journal Article

An ‘undeliberate determinacy’? The changing migration strategies of Polish migrants in the UK in times of Brexit

Authors Derek McGhee, Chris Moreh, Athina Vlachantoni
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 10
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71 Journal Article

Agency in Fertility Decisions in Western Europe During the Demographic Transition: A Comparative Perspective

Authors David Sven Reher, Alberto Sanz-Gimeno, Glenn Sandström, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Demography
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72 Journal Article

The Majority‐Minority Divide in Attitudes toward Internal Migration: Evidence from Mumbai

Authors Nikhar Gaikwad, Gareth Nellis
Year 2017
Journal Name American Journal of Political Science
Citations (WoS) 5
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73 Journal Article

International students’ post-graduation migration plans and the search for home

Authors Cary Wu, Rima Wilkes
Year 2017
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 5
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74 Journal Article

Study on migrants' profiles, drivers of migration and migratory trends

Authors Luigi ACHILLI, Philippe FARGUES, Justyna Janina SALAMONSKA, ...
Description
This study analyses the socioeconomic background of migrants and refugees who have fled to Italy. It compiles information about their education level, work experience, skills, professional aspirations and future employment prospects. The aim of this research is to help policy-makers in Italy and across Europe get a current, in-depth profile of migrants, understand what drives them to leave home, what influences their decisions during their journey and how they can better integrate in Italy.
Year 2016
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75 Report

Ukrainian Migration to Greece: from Irregular Work to Settlement, Family Reunification and Return

Authors Marina Nikolova, Michaela Maroufof
Year 2016
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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76 Book Chapter

Between National Models and Multi-Level Decoupling: The Pursuit of Multi-Level Governance in Dutch and UK Policies Towards Migrant Incorporation

Authors Peter Scholten
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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77 Journal Article

Between National Models and Multi-Level Decoupling: The Pursuit of Multi-Level Governance in Dutch and UK Policies Towards Migrant Incorporation

Authors Peter Scholten
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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78 Journal Article

How to stimulate single mothers on welfare to find a job: evidence from a policy experiment

Authors Marike Knoef, Jan C. van Ours
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Population Economics
Citations (WoS) 4
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79 Journal Article

Contemporary Ukrainian Migration Problems in a Light of Euromaidan's Protests and War

Authors Janja Vollmaier Lubej
Year 2016
Journal Name ARS & HUMANITAS
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80 Journal Article

Social Remittances and the Impact of Temporary Migration on an EU Sending Country: The Case of Poland

Authors Izabela Grabowska, Godfried Engbersen
Year 2016
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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81 Journal Article

A TALE OF TWO AHMADIYYA MOSQUES: RELIGION, ETHNIC POLITICS, AND URBAN PLANNING IN LONDON

Authors Marzia Balzani
Year 2015
Journal Name LABORATORIUM-RUSSIAN REVIEW OF SOCIAL RESEARCH
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82 Journal Article

Between global dreams and national duties: the dilemma of conscription duty in the transnational lives of young Korean males

Authors Kirsten Younghee Song
Year 2015
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 2
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83 Journal Article

Gender, masculinity and migration: Mexican men and reproductive health in the Californian context

Authors M. Catherine Maternowska, Claire D. Brindis, Mellissa Withers
Year 2014
Journal Name CULTURE HEALTH & SEXUALITY
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84 Journal Article

Gender, Turning Points, and Boomerangs: Returning Home in Young Adulthood in Great Britain

Authors Juliet Stone, Ann Berrington, Jane Falkingham
Year 2014
Journal Name Demography
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85 Journal Article

What we learned from the Dust Bowl: lessons in science, policy, and adaptation

Authors Robert A. McLeman, Juliette Dupre, Konrad Gajewski, ...
Year 2014
Journal Name Population and Environment
Citations (WoS) 43
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86 Journal Article

The Big Five Personality Traits and Attitudes towards Immigrants

Authors Aina Gallego, Sergi Pardos-Prado
Year 2014
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 32
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87 Journal Article

Exploring the Contextual Determinants of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants and Criminal Activity and their Spillover Policy Implications

Authors Garrick L. Percival, Mary Currin-Percival
Year 2013
Journal Name International Migration
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89 Journal Article

New Europe, new chances? The migration of professional footballers to Poland's Ekstraklasa

Authors Richard Elliott
Year 2013
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL REVIEW FOR THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
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90 Journal Article

Differences in the Use of Primary Care Services Between Spanish National and Immigrant Patients

Authors L. A. Gimeno-Feliu, R. M. Macipe-Costa, M. Lasheras-Barrio, ...
Year 2013
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
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91 Journal Article

"Abroad I was Greek and in Greece I am a Foreigner": Pontic Greeks from Former Soviet Union in Greece

Authors Hionidou
Year 2012
Journal Name Journal of Modern Greek Studies
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92 Journal Article

Moving Ahead in Madrid: Aspirations and Expectations in the Spanish Second Generation

Authors Alejandro Portes, Erik Vickstrom, Rosa Aparicio, ...
Year 2010
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 33
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93 Journal Article

Land and leña: linking transnational migration, natural resources, and the environment in Guatemala

Authors Michelle J. Moran-Taylor, Matthew J. Taylor
Year 2010
Journal Name Population and Environment
Citations (WoS) 26
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94 Journal Article

Integration Survey: Determinants and Indicators of Integration and Segregation of the Foreign Population

Authors Bundesinstitut für Bevölkerungsforschung (BiB)
Description
This study aims to portray causes and factors that promote or impede the integration of the foreign population in Germany. For this reason, approx. 2,400 immigrants of Italian and Turkish origin were asked about their living conditions, behaviours and attitudes. The question of the forms of and determining factors for integration of the foreign population is increasingly gaining significance with the permanent settlement of the groups that immigrated as former “guest workers” and their progeny. However, there is frequently a lack of suitable data to provide empirically substantiated answers to questions much discussed by society such as: How far has the integration of persons with migration backgrounds (immigrants) progressed in the educational and vocational areas, and how can we explain their distance to the Germans, if any? What is the situation with regard to the interest and participation of immigrants in the political and social spheres? Are the numbers of interethnic marriages and friendships increasing, and are there differences in this regard between the nationalities? These questions are especially urgent when it is a matter of the “second” or “third generation” of immigrants, since the integration or segregation of this group will decisively characterize society in Germany in coming decades. For these reasons, in July 2000 the market and opinion research institute BIK Aschpurwis und Behrens, Hamburg, was commissioned with a widespread survey of immigrants of Italian and Turkish origin in the ages of 18 to 30 years as well as a German control group (each with approx. 1,200 respondents). The survey data were delivered to the BiB in late March of 2001. The survey recorded items concerning living conditions, behaviour and attitudes. The core themes consisted of school, vocational, social, linguistic and identification integration; the type and extent of contacts to the ethnic community and its institutions; attitudes towards life in Germany and political participation as well as familial living conditions and attitudes. Due to the thematic breadth of the survey and the large number of respondents, the data enable substantiated assertions on the integrative patterns of the groups studied. The data of the Integration Survey can be accessed at GESIS under the study number ZA4821.
Year 2010
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95 Data Set

Does the Welfare State Affect Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants? Evidence across Countries

Authors Giovanni Facchini, Anna Maria Mayda
Year 2009
Journal Name Review of Economics and Statistics
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96 Journal Article

Language and the Second Generation: Bilingualism Yesterday and Today

Authors Alejandro Portes, Richard Schauffler
Year 1994
Journal Name International Migration Review
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97 Journal Article

Language and the Second Generation: Bilingualism Yesterday and Today

Authors Alejandro Portes, Richard Schauffler
Year 1994
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 170
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
98 Journal Article

What Drives Migration to Europe? Survey Experimental Evidence from Lebanon

Authors Anselm Hager
Year 2021
Journal Name International Migration Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
99 Journal Article
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