Diaspora engagement policies

Diasporas refer to migrants or descendants of migrants; other terms used in the literature are expatriates or transnational communities. Diaspora engagement policies consist of a variety of government measures aimed at engaging, maintaining or developing a relationship with their diaspora living abroad. These policies include ensuring the rights and protection of diaspora members and reinforcing national identity or sense of belonging, fostering strong relations and facilitating diaspora contributions to a country’s social and economic development (i.e. remittances). Results displayed under this category refer to research on policies, laws, legislation, regulation or measures that apply to members of the society who reside abroad.

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The Diaspora and the Politics of Development

Authors Dominic Pasura
Book Title African Transnational Diasporas
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1 Book Chapter

Revisiting the Remittance Mantra: A Study of Migration-Development Policy Formation in Tanzania

Authors Peter Hansen
Year 2012
Journal Name International Migration
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2 Journal Article

Sending Country Policies

Authors Eva Østergaard-Nielsen
Book Title Integration Processes and Policies in Europe
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3 Book Chapter

Assessing "Global Lithuania": the strengths and weaknesses of Lithuanian diaspora engagement strategy

Authors Dangis Gudelis, Luka Klimaviciute
Year 2016
Journal Name JOURNAL OF BALTIC STUDIES
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4 Journal Article

THE EMIGRATION OF GREEKS AND DIASPORA ENGAGEMENT POLICIES FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Authors J Cavounidis
Description
Since the onset of the economic crisis in 2008, hundreds of thousands of Greeks have left their homeland to seek employment abroad. Unlike past waves of emigration from Greece, the current wave is composed primarily of well-educated youth, whose precious knowledge and skills will be used to the advantage of other countries. Their exodus poses two major policy challenges: first, how to stem the outflow and utilize their knowledge and skills at home and, second, how to harness the enormous potential of Greeks currently abroad to benefit the Greek economy, by mobilizing the diaspora to use their knowledge, skills, talents, resources, and networks in ways which will positively impact the Greek economy. It is on this second set of policy challenges that this book focuses. OECD data on emigrants living in OECD and other countries reveal the increased educational level of those leaving Greece over the last decade compared to their predecessors. The populations of people born in Greece residing in various destination countries differ markedly, however, in terms of their educational profile. The Greek-born population living in the UK is by far the most educated, with nearly 70% holding a university degree, while only a small proportion of the Greek-born population in Germany has a university degree. Nonetheless, the composition of the Greek-born population living in Germany is changing rapidly, given that in the last decade Germany overtook the US as the number-one destination of Greek emigrants and that the educational level of recent Greek emigrants to Germany greatly exceeds that of Greeks who moved to Germany in previous decades. The Greek diaspora contains hugely successful business people, professionals, and academics, while its pool of talent is constantly expanding. So far, Greece has done little to utilise its valuable diaspora to the benefit of its economy. The international experience abounds with examples of successful diaspora policies implemented by both developing and developed countries, such as the creation of professional, scientific, and entrepreneurial networks which facilitate transfers of skills and knowledge and promote business development. For instance, the Talent Network for Innovation of ChileGlobal is composed of highly skilled members of Chile’s diaspora who contribute their time, experience, contacts, knowledge, and skills in order to create innovative Chilean companies and help existing companies to innovate and globalise. The Global Irish Network is composed of very influential Irish and Irish-connected business people based in forty countries who contribute to Irish economic development by promoting foreign direct investment and providing practical assistance to Irish exporters. Indus Entrepreneurs is a network of highly-skilled overseas Indians founded in Silicon Valley in 1992 which organizes hundreds of networking and entrepreneurship events every year and has played a major role in creating high-tech firms in India and stimulating spectacular economic growth. Greece needs to utilize the potential of its diaspora to enhance economic growth. Drawing on the rich international policy experience, the specific diaspora population segments and individuals that can make a valuable contribution to the Greek economy need to be identified and effectively mobilized, in order to capture the development benefits offered by its exceptionally talented diaspora.
Year 2016
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5 Report

Feeding the Ties to "Home": Diaspora Policies for the Next Generations

Authors Rilke Mahieu
Year 2015
Journal Name International Migration
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6 Journal Article

A Global Nation? The Evolution of Emigration and Diaspora Policies in Portugal (1960–2016)

Authors Ana Paula Horta, José Santana-Pereira
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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7 Book Chapter

Tapping into the Potential of Academic Diaspora for Homeland Development: the Case of Nigeria

Authors Francis Amagoh, Taiabur Rahman
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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8 Journal Article

The Punjabi Diaspora in the UK: An overview of characteristics and contributions to India

Authors Rupa CHANDA, Sriparna GHOSH
Description
The recognition of diaspora contributions towards their home country through remittances, investments and networks has facilitated a shift in attitude and thinking regarding migration, from brain drain to “brain bank”, “brain gain”, “brain trust” and “brain circulation”. This shift in thinking is also evident in India in recognition of the manifold contributions being made by the Indian diaspora to the home country. This paper examines the historical and socio-economic characteristics of one important Indian diaspora community, the Punjabis in the UK and discusses the latter’s contributions to India and to its home state of Punjab. The evidence reveals that the NRI Punjabi diaspora in the UK is quite old, dating back to the colonial period. It is a heterogeneous community, divided by castes and sub-castes which influence the institutions through which its subgroups engage with the homeland. The secondary and primary evidence collected for this study indicate a wide variety of contributions economic, social, philanthropic, cultural and political. Some of the main sectors of contribution are health, education and rural infrastructure. However, the evidence also reveals that there is much greater potential for diaspora engagement and that large scale investments by the diaspora are deterred by corruption, an inefficient bureaucracy, lack of streamlined procedures and lack of supportive diaspora policies at the state and central levels. The study thus concludes that greater thrust is needed, especially at the state level to facilitate the Punjabi diaspora’s engagement with India and with its home regions and state.
Year 2012
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9 Report

Home States and Homeland Politics

Authors Damla B. Aksel
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10 Book

‘We’re not coming from Mars; we know how things work in Morocco!’ How diasporic Moroccan youth resists political socialisation in state-led homeland tours

Authors Rilke Mahieu
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 5
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11 Journal Article

Diaspora policy in weakly governed arenas and the benefits of multipolar engagement: lessons from the Coptic Orthodox Church in Egypt

Authors Jennifer M. Brinkerhoff
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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13 Journal Article

Diaspora as Digital Diplomatic Agents: ‘BOSNET’ and Wartime Foreign Affairs

Authors Jasmin Hasić, Dzeneta Karabegovic
Year 2020
Journal Name Migration Letters
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14 Journal Article

Rethinking migration in the digital age: transglocalization and the Somali diaspora

Authors Saskia Kok, Richard Rogers
Year 2017
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 9
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15 Journal Article

The transnational politics of the Ethiopian Muslim diaspora

Authors Dereje Feyissa
Year 2012
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 2
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16 Journal Article

Aiming for transitional justice? Diaspora mobilisation for youth and education in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Authors Dzeneta Karabegovic
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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17 Journal Article

Governing the Remittance Landscape for Development: Policies and Actors in Bangladesh

Authors Mohammad Moniruzzaman
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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18 Book Chapter

Ukraine and Greece - Two Diasporas: Engagement and Disengagement with the Homeland at Times of Crisis

Authors Foteini Kalantzi, Iryna Lapshyna
Year 2020
Journal Name CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN MIGRATION REVIEW
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19 Journal Article

Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility

Authors Agnieszka WEINAR
Year 2017
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20 Book

Building homeland heritage: multiple homes among the Chinese diaspora and the politics on heritage management in China

Authors Hiu Ling Chan, Christopher Cheng
Year 2016
Journal Name International Journal of Heritage Studies
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21 Journal Article

Turkey's New Diaspora Policy: The Challenge of Inclusivity, Outreach and Capacity

Description
Turkey has many expatriate communities abroad, as well as communities of various origins, whose members reside within its borders and feel connected to other states or regions. Many of these communities have been ignored or eyed with suspi-cion by the modern Turkish nation-state since its inception in the 1920s. It is only recently that Turkey has “discovered” its people abroad and the diaspora communities within, a discovery that appears to be causally connected with Turkey’s rising ambitions and ‘soft power’ capabilities. Under the Justice and Development Party, efforts for a concerted dias-pora policy have reached a peak with the creation of the Presidency for Turks Abroad and Related Communities in 2010. This report deals with the Presidency, its goals and capacities, its role within the larger context of Turkey’s foreign policy and its desired and actual impacts on Turkey’s diaspora communities.Is this a “new diaspora policy” geared towards increasing Turkish influence abroad or an attempt to improve the quality of life of Turkish citizens often experiencing discrimination in Western European countries? Or is it an example of constructive foreign policy and diaspora building among a disparate group of people, most of whom have only very little in common? Based on qualita-tive field research in the Presidency, this paper argues that Turkey’s new diaspora policy combines all of these different approaches. This openness and flexibility is a great strength, even though significant political challenges await Turkey’s diaspora policies, precisely because it is still very much in the process of assembly. That said, this first stage in the making of Turkey’s diaspora policy is a perfect time to discuss its direction and suggest ways to make it more inclusive and internationally respected. This is all the more important as Turks abroad are likely to experience more discrimination in a European Union increasingly influenced by racist and Islamo-phobic political parties, while the contestations over the hundredth anniversary of the Armenian geno-cide in 2015 will add new stress to inter-community relations between Turks, Kurds and Armenians abroad. An inclusive and post-nationalist diaspora policy would be an important remedy to both of these challenges.
Year 2014
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23 Report

DIASPORA AND SOVEREIGNTY: THREE CASES OF PUBLIC ALARM IN THE NETHERLANDS

Authors GERTJAN DIJKINK, INGE VAN DER WELLE
Year 2009
Journal Name Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie
Citations (WoS) 2
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24 Journal Article

From emigrants to free movers: whither European emigration and diaspora policy?

Authors Agnieszka Weinar
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
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25 Journal Article

Diasporas, Development and Governance

Authors Jonathan Crush, Abel Chikanda, Margaret Walton-Roberts
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26 Book

Strong in Their Weakness or Weak in Their Strength? The Case of Lebanese Diaspora Engagement with Lebanon

Authors Jennifer Skulte-Ouaiss, Paul Tabar
Year 2015
Journal Name Immigrants & Minorities
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27 Journal Article

Diaspora Engagement in India: From Non-Required Indians to Angels of Development

Authors Melissa Siegel, Metka Hercog
Book Title Emigration Nations
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28 Book Chapter

A comparative analysis of diaspora policies

Authors Francesco Ragazzi
Year 2014
Journal Name POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
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29 Journal Article

To share or not to share: The role of affect in knowledge sharing by individuals in a diaspora

Authors Helena Barnard, Catherine Pendock
Year 2013
Journal Name Journal of International Management
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30 Journal Article

Emigration and diaspora policies in Belarus

Authors Andrei YELISEYEU
Description
In the first half of the 1990s, Belarus saw large migration flows, which since then have become considerably more moderate. The main destination countries for Belarusian emigrants are Russia, Poland, Germany, the US, and Canada. Over the last decade, temporary labour migration of Belarusians to the European Union has remained rather limited. At the same time labour migration flows of Belarusians towards Russia have increased. Belarus is a highly centralized state with regional authorities playing a marginal role in elaborating state policies, including in emigration matters. In order to curb emigration, Belarus authorities have resorted to the adoption of laws that discourage mobility. Taking into account growing labour shortages, the state policy to attract immigrants has been largely ineffective. At the same time, by September 2014 Belarus had reportedly hosted more than 25,000 Ukrainian migrants as a result of the military conflict in the Donbass region. Diaspora policy in Belarus is largely incoherent and selective. The long-awaited diaspora law is set to be adopted soon, but it fails to take into account the aspirations of diaspora members.
Year 2014
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31 Report

Juxtaposing Pakistani diaspora policy with migrants’ transnational citizenship practices

Authors Marta Bivand Erdal
Year 2016
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 5
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32 Journal Article

Cultural or Political Diaspora: Approach of the Russian Federation

Authors Olga Tkach
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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33 Book Chapter

Diaspora Policies, Consular Services and Social Protection for French Citizens Abroad

Authors Jean-Thomas Arrighi de Casanova, Jean-Michel Lafleur
Year 2020
Book Title Migration and Social Protection in Europe and Beyond (Volume 2)
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34 Book Chapter

Distant warriors, distant peace workers? Multiple diaspora roles in Sri Lanka's violent conflict

Authors CAMILLA ORJUELA
Year 2008
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 48
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36 Journal Article

Diaspora Engagement in Ireland, North and South, in the Shadow of Brexit

Authors Johanne Devlin Trew
Book Title Rethinking the Irish Diaspora
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37 Book Chapter

Towards an Iraqi diaspora engagement policy

Authors Martin Russell, Marion Noack
Year 2017
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38 Policy Brief

Introduction: Disaggregating Diasporas

Authors Jonathan Crush, Abel Chikanda, Margaret Walton-Roberts
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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39 Book Chapter

A Creative Approach to Development

Authors Paul Ankomah, Trent Larson, Jerono Rotich, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name Journal of Black Studies
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40 Journal Article

Diasporas and transitional justice: transnational activism from local to global levels of engagement

Authors Maria Koinova, Dzeneta Karabegovic
Year 2017
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 18
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41 Journal Article

Goans in Portugal: Role of history and identity in shaping diaspora linkages

Authors Rupa CHANDA, Sriparna GHOSH
Description
The Portuguese colonial era in India began in 1502 and ended in 1961 with the annexation of Goa by India. This long standing colonial relationship led to a deep-rooted historical, cultural and social relationship between Goa and Portugal. Migration from Goa to Portugal, over different periods, played an important part in forging this relationship. This paper examines the history of migration from Goa to Portugal, the characteristics of the Goan community in Portugal, and its engagement with Goa and with India, based on secondary and primary sources of information. Section 2 discusses the different waves of migration from Goa to Portugal. It finds that Goans migrated to Portugal during the colonial period in search of education, then following the annexation of Goa by India in 1961, and subsequently during the 1970s when Goans “twice migrated” to Portugal from Mozambique and Angola following their independence. In recent decades, Goans have been migrating to Portugal to seek access to the larger European market. Today, there is a sizeable Goan community residing in Portugal. Sections 3 and 4 explore the question of identity as perceived by this community in Portugal. The findings indicate that history, the causal factors underlying migration, and the heterogeneity within the community in terms of background, economic and social status have a major influence on the notion of identity. One section of the community does not consider itself as a diaspora group or as expatriates or migrants as it sees itself as fully integrated with Portuguese society. Their connection is with Goa, not with India. Another section of the community views itself as belonging to India and also Goa, realizing that they have a distinct identity within Portugal. For the twice migrated, the issue of identity is even more complex as they identify with a third country and many have never lived in Goa or India. Section 5 discusses how this issue of identity has in manifested itself in different ways, such as through the community’ position on issues of minority representation within Portuguese society, through diaspora associations and networks, and the extent to which the community has engaged with and contributed back to Goa and India. It finds that due to the dilemma over identity, the community has had very weak economic and philanthropic ties with the homeland. Section 6 highlights the growing engagement between the Goan community in Portugal and India in recent years and some initiatives at the government level to deepen this engagement. However, it finds that a long term strategic vision has been lacking on the part of both the Indian and the Portuguese governments. Section 7 concludes by calling for a forward looking approach to engaging with the Goan diaspora community in Portugal. It recommends that this community be strategically leveraged not only to strengthen economic and cultural relations with Portugal but also to serve India’s larger foreign policy and geopolitical objectives in the Lusophone countries of Latin America and Africa.
Year 2012
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42 Report

Unpacking the (Diasporic) Nation: The Regionalized and Religious Identities of the ‘Indian’ Diaspora

Authors Margaret Walton-Roberts, Huzan Dordi
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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43 Book Chapter

Diasporas, Development and Engagement in Australia’s Asian Century

Authors Graeme Hugo
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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44 Book Chapter

Diaspora Engagement for Development in the Caribbean

Authors Indianna D. Minto-Coy
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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45 Book Chapter

Eritrea on-line: Diaspora, cyberspace, and the public sphere

Authors Victoria Bernal
Year 2005
Journal Name American Ethnologist
Citations (WoS) 43
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46 Journal Article

Jakarta and Paramaribo Calling Return Migration Challenges for the Surinamese Javanese Diaspora?

Authors Peter Meel
Year 2017
Journal Name NWIG-NEW WEST INDIAN GUIDE-NIEUWE WEST-INDISCHE GIDS
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47 Journal Article

Engaging the Global Filipino Diaspora: Achieving Inclusive Growth

Authors Imelda M. Nicolas
Book Title Diasporas, Development and Governance
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48 Book Chapter

Diaspora Engagement and Policy in Ethiopia

Authors Melissa Siegel, Katie Kuschminder
Book Title Emigration Nations
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49 Book Chapter

The Promise of a Welfare State: The Ecuadorian Government Strategy on Emigration and Diaspora Policies Between 2007–2016

Authors Consuelo Sánchez Bautista
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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52 Book Chapter

Emigration-diaspora policy nexus in migration policies of the EU Eastern Partnership countries and in Russia

Authors Shushanik MAKARYAN
Description
Provoked by more frequent discussions about the "emigration-diaspora" nexus among the researchers on international development, this policy brief, written based on the explanatory notes submitted by country-experts of CARIM-East project, explores the emigration-diaspora issues in migration policies of post-Soviet states in the EU neighborhood. As the examination of CARIM-East country experts reveals, the primary focus of emigration policies of post-Soviet states remains linked to labour migration and focuses on the prevention of emigration (and return of emigrated co-nationals), although migration policies of post-Soviet states also emphasize the need for integrating their labour-force into the international labour market. Post-Soviet governments offer various stimuli to attract their former residents to return to homeland, ranging from advocacy campaigns on business development to matching financial investments from remittances to providing grants to those trained abroad. Despite the conceptual ambiguity stemming from including labour migrants into diasporas, or as the development community has referred to -- "migrant diasporas", the policy documents of post-Soviet states use the term diasporas to refer to both permanently emigrated former citizens, and to current citizens living abroad (regardless of length of residency abroad). However, a more systematic examination is needed to understand whether and in which aspects the focus of migration policies of post-Soviet is different or overlaps for labour migrants abroad vs. diasporas.
Year 2013
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54 Report

Diaspora Policies

Description
The Diaspora Policies dataset focuses on thirty-five states characterized in terms of their symbolic policies, social and economic policies, religious and cultural policies, citizenship policies and government and bureaucratic control, coded in nineteen categorical variables. The dataset includes features of diaspora policies. The dataset is composed of 19 indicators, regrouped in five headings: symbolic policies, social and economic policies, religious and cultural policies, citizenship policies and government and bureaucratic control. Data for these variables has been collected from a variety of secondary sources, as well as primary sources from states, international organizations and diaspora organizations
Year 2013
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55 Data Set

Special issue introduction: New research directions and critical perspectives on diaspora strategies

Authors Elaine Lynn-Ee Ho, Maureen Hickey, Brenda S.A. Yeoh
Year 2015
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 19
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56 Journal Article

Turkey’s Ever-Evolving Attitude-Shift Towards Engagement with Its Diaspora

Authors Bahar Baser
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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57 Book Chapter

Diaspora Engagment Policies

Description
Based on review of documentary sources on state-emigrant relations, the dataset reviews how 64 states relate to their diasporas. It shows how states constitute various extra-territorial groups as members of a loyal diaspora, through a diverse range of institutions and practices. Three higher-level types of diaspora engagement policy are identified: 1 - capacity building policies, aimed at discursively producing a state-centric ‘transnational national society’, and developing a set of corresponding state institution; 2 - extending rights to the diaspora, thus playing a role that befits a legitimate sovereign, and 3 - extracting obligations from the diaspora, based on the premise that emigrants owe loyalty to this legitimate sovereign.
Year 2008
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59 Data Set

From Economic to Political Engagement: Analysing the Changing Role of the Turkish Diaspora

Authors Melissa Siegel, Özge Bilgili
Book Title Emigration Nations
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60 Book Chapter

Diaspora Formation Among Kurds in Sweden: Transborder citizenship and politics of belonging

Authors Khalid Khayati, Magnus Dahlstedt
Year 2014
Journal Name Nordic Journal of Migration Research
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61 Journal Article

Governance of integration and the role of the countries of origin : a global perspective

Authors Agnieszka WEINAR, Maria Vincenza DESIDERIO, Cameron THIBOS
Year 2017
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62 Book Chapter

The Butler Affair and the Geopolitics of Identity

Authors Gerry Kearns
Year 2013
Journal Name Environment and Planning D: Society and Space
Citations (WoS) 10
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63 Journal Article

Economic Integration to Send Money Back Home?

Authors Özge Bilgili
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies
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65 Journal Article

Highly Skilled Egyptian Migrants in Austria: A Case of Brain Drain or Brain Gain?

Authors Alessia Bacchi
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies
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68 Journal Article

Ethno‐sectarianism in Iraq, diaspora positionality and political transnationalism

Authors OULA KADHUM
Year 2018
Journal Name Global Networks
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70 Journal Article

Emerging Transnational Practices and Capabilities of Syrian Refugees in Turkey

Authors Zeynep Sahin Mencütek
Year 2020
Journal Name Migration Letters
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71 Journal Article

Post-Soviet Migration and Diasporas

Authors David Carment, Milana V. Nikolko
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72 Book

Introducing emigration and diaspora policies in integration studies

Authors Anna DI BARTOLOMEO, Sona KALANTARYAN, Justyna Janina SALAMONSKA, ...
Year 2017
Book Title Migrant integration between homeland and host society. Volume 2, How countries of origin impact migrant integration outcomes : an analysis
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73 Book Chapter

Working with the Diaspora for Development Policy Perspectives from India

Authors Alwyn Didar SINGH
Description
Human resource mobility is an essential feature of today’s globalised world where integrated world markets, networks and technologies are all contributing to the increasing movement of labour, students, professionals and families. The migrants of today are the Diaspora of tomorrow - and those of yesteryears, that of today. The Indo-European Diaspora represents a significant population in its size, spread and depth. Yet it is argued that their engagement – economic, social and cultural– with India is currently short of its potential relative to their counterparts in North America. This paper examines that relationship and suggests how both India and the EU must draw upon the Indian strategy to widen and strengthen the bridge that the Indian Diaspora represents. The paper focuses on a five select countries in the EU for this analysis, i.e. Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, being countries that not only have the largest presence of Overseas Indians in mainland Europe but are also strategically important for India. The paper examines the link between Diaspora and development and concludes that it’s a relationship that needs to be nurtured for mutual benefit. It argues that the Indo-European Diaspora has contributed to the economies of the host countries and now is in a position to play a part in India’s developmental efforts. For this a conducive framework needs to be in place. The Indian Government’s policies and programmes are steps in this direction and the time is opportune for the Diaspora to evolve mutually beneficial strategies with both host and home countries to carry forward the relationship.
Year 2012
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75 Report

Recasting diaspora strategies through feminist care ethics

Authors Elaine L.-E. Ho, Mark Boyle, Brenda S.A. Yeoh
Year 2015
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 15
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78 Journal Article

Engagement Policies and Practices: Expanding the Citizenship of the Brazilian Diaspora

Authors Beatriz Padilla
Year 2011
Journal Name International Migration
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79 Journal Article

Issues of mutuality and sharing in the transnational spaces of heritage - contesting diaspora and homeland experiences in Palestine

Authors Feras Hammami
Year 2016
Journal Name International Journal of Heritage Studies
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81 Journal Article

Tunisia and its diaspora : between protection and control

Authors Stéphanie POUESSEL
Year 2017
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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82 Book Chapter

Nigeria @ 50: Policies and Practices for Diaspora Engagement

Authors Naluwembe Binaisa
Book Title Emigration Nations
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83 Book Chapter

Bifurcated homeland and diaspora politics in China and Taiwan towards the Overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia

Authors Enze Han
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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86 Journal Article

The Implementation of Voting from Abroad: Evidence from the 2014 Turkish Presidential Election

Authors Zeynep Sahin-Mencutek, M. Murat Erdogan
Year 2016
Journal Name International Migration
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87 Journal Article

Diaspora policies and co-development: A Comparison between India, China and Mexico

Authors Camelia Tigau, Amba Pande, Yan Yuan
Year 2017
Journal Name Migration Letters
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88 Journal Article

Emigration policies in contemporary Europe

Authors Agnieszka WEINAR
Description
The aim of the paper is to prioritise the missing side of European migration governance, that is its approach to emigration and diaspora. In order to fill the research gap and to start building a coherent knowledge base on emigration and diaspora policies in the EU, it proposes the mapping of the national responses to emigration over the last four years (mostly overlapping with the economic crisis and post-accession mobility). In this context it tackles two main questions. First, what do we know about emigration from the EU – who migrates and to where? Second, what are the main categories of response of the EU Member States to emigration? In other words, how can we categorize the existing European emigration and diaspora policies? The paper is based on commissioned reports written by 28 EU country correspondents provided in the framework of the project Carim East.
Year 2014
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89 Report

The migration and integration of Moroccan and Ukrainian migrants in Italy : policies and measures

Authors Anna DI BARTOLOMEO, Giuseppe GABRIELLI, Salvatore STROZZA
Description
The present report looks at the integration of Moroccan and Ukrainian migrants living in Italy. Beyond being quantitatively important in the Italian context, these two groups differ largely in terms of demographic characteristics, migration patterns and insertion modalities but also with respect to emigration and diaspora policies. Two core aspects of integration are emphasized in this report. First, integration processes are evaluated from a multi-dimensional perspective. Second, the role played by origin (and destination) country determinants in facilitating or constraining integration is investigated. Origin determinants include the ties between migrants and their country of origin, country-fixed characteristics, diaspora and emigration policies at origin and the engagement and role of non-state organisations. To this aim, three sets of data have been employed, making this report largely multidisciplinary: an in-depth analytical description of the legal and political frameworks at origin and destination, a quantitative analysis and an explorative qualitative survey. This report finds evidence that integration levels, determinants and, specifically, the role of origin factors vary largely across dimensions. In the labour market, both Moroccan and Ukrainian migrants living in Italy show high levels of integration. These extremely positive performances seem due more to destination than origin factors - namely Italy’s labour market specificities and migration history. Conversely, origin determinants presumably have a lower impact. In addition, the role played by NGOs appears relevant in helping migrants find employment - not good employment or well-remunerated employment but just employment. In the education dimension, things differ. At an international level, Ukrainians living in Italy show good levels of integration once controlled for natives’ performance. Origin determinants - in terms of conditions at home - thus seem to prevail here. Not surprisingly, the degree of integration in the ‘access to citizenship’ dimension is connected to the degree of openness/restrictiveness of host citizenship laws and, accordingly, to the length of presence in the country. Our results confirm that Italy is still one of the countries where getting citizenship is one of the main constraints for migrants in both recent communities (Ukrainians) and well-established ones (Moroccans). Finally, cultural integration is a main obstacle to Moroccan integration, while Ukrainians are also found to be in a difficult position with respect to social and political integration. In terms of ties between migrants and their country of origin, a micro-level analysis confirms a very clear pattern: the lower the (cultural, economic, political, social) ties, the higher the level of integration. This applies - to a different extent - to all dimensions and types of ties.
Year 2015
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90 Report

From Limited to Active Engagement: Mexico's Emigration Policies from a Foreign Policy Perspective (2000–2006)

Authors Alexandra Délano
Year 2009
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 13
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91 Journal Article

Mixing Methods to Explain Emigration Policies: A Post-Positivist Perspective

Authors Alan Gamlen, Chris McIntyre
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of Mixed Methods Research
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93 Journal Article

Report on Tunisian legal emigration to the EU modes of integration, policy, institutional frameworks and engagement of non-state actors

Authors Stéphanie POUESSEL
Description
Tunisia has a long history of emigration to the European Union. The Tunisian state has progressively created and implemented a migration policy to protect Tunisian citizens abroad and to tighten ties with the country. This report presents the current policy concerning emigration – strengthening migrant ties with Tunisia and fighting against illegal migration – and policies that concern the diaspora – measures encouraging investment in Tunisia, protection of social rights abroad, new integration of the diaspora within political and civil Tunisian society. To this end, the report provides an update on the political and civil rights of emigrants (voting, plural nationalities, military duty), socio-economic rights (agreements on labor migration, custom/import incentives), social rights (family, social security) and cultural rights (languages, school, media). The report also presents the engagement of non-state actors from abroad. The collapse of the revolution has permitted the country to redefine the political participation of Tunisians abroad and their integration in politics in Tunisia. The demands of Tunisians abroad for rights to participate in politics at high levels (the right to become representatives in the Assembly; the right for a Tunisian with dual-nationality citizenship to become President) were ratified on January 2014.
Year 2014
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94 Report

Vietnam and Its Diaspora: An Evolving Relationship

Authors Tien Nguyen
Book Title Emigration and diaspora policies in the age of mobility
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96 Book Chapter

Emigration Nations

Authors Michael Collyer
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97 Book

Endorsers, challengers or builders? Political parties’ diaspora outreach in a post-conflict state

Authors Maria Koinova
Year 2018
Journal Name International Political Science Review
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99 Journal Article
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