Outsourcing to private actors

Outsourcing means to externalise, to shift, tasks, operative tasks or processes to a third party. Results displayed under this category refer to any processes related to the outsourcing of the application and implementation of state policies, laws, legislation, regulation or measures to non-state sectors (either private for profit or third sector for no profit). In the area of migration, outsourcing can occur, for example, for border surveillance to private actors (companies), or for the management and provision of reception services (to civil society and non-governmental organisations or the private sector), or the management of detention centers for migrants.

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Financialization and Outsourcing in a Different Guise: The Ethical Chaos of Workforce Localization in the United Arab Emirates

Authors Valerie Priscilla Goby
Year 2015
Journal Name JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS
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1 Journal Article

The business of noncitizenship

Authors Tendayi Bloom
Year 2015
Journal Name Citizenship Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
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2 Journal Article

The Privatization and Outsourcing of Migration Management

Authors Georg Menz
Book Title Labour Migration in Europe
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3 Book Chapter

The Privatization of Control over Labour Migration in the Netherlands: In Whose Interest?

Authors Tesseltje de Lange, Tesseltje de Lange*
Year 2011
Journal Name European Journal of Migration and Law
Citations (WoS) 6
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4 Journal Article

Citizenship and the contracting out of military work: from national conscription to globalized recruitment

Authors Maya Eichler
Year 2014
Journal Name Citizenship Studies
Citations (WoS) 16
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6 Journal Article

In private hands? the markets of migration control and the politics of outsourcing

Authors Ana López-Sala, Dirk Godenau
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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8 Journal Article

Carrier Sanctions in Europe: A Comparison of Trends in 10 Countries

Authors Theodore Baird
Year 2017
Journal Name European Journal of Migration and Law
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9 Journal Article

A new era for labour migration in the GCC?

Authors Philip Martin, Froilan T. Malit
Year 2017
Journal Name Migration Letters
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10 Journal Article

Regulating Immigration Control: Carrier Sanctions in the Netherlands

Authors Sophie Scholten, Paul Minderhoud
Year 2008
Journal Name European Journal of Migration and Law
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11 Journal Article

An Analysis of Factors Influencing the International Migration of Indian Nurses

Authors Hisaya Oda, Yuko Tsujita, Sebastian Irudaya Rajan
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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12 Journal Article

Bringing in State Regulations, Private Brokers, and Local Employers: A Meso-Level Analysis of Labor Trafficking in Israel

Authors Adriana Kemp, Rebeca Raijman
Year 2014
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 10
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26 Journal Article

Implementing a diversity policy through public incentives: Diversity Plans in companies of the Brussels-Capital Region

Authors Alexandre Tandé
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 3
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28 Journal Article

Outsourcing Care

Authors Jessaca B. Leinaweaver
Year 2010
Journal Name Latin American Perspectives
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33 Journal Article

Implementation of the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration: A Whole-of-Society Approach

Authors J. Kevin Appleby
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal on Migration and Human Security
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34 Journal Article

Global Migration Issues

Authors Graziano Battistella
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35 Book

Demography, migration, and the labour market in Bahrain

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
Mid-2013, estimates of Bahrain s population stood at 1,253,191 persons, of whom 638,361 (51 per cent) were foreign nationals. Most were from Asia (85 per cent) and especially from India (half of all foreign residents). Eighty per cent of expatriates are employed. They account for 77 per cent of the employed population and 81 per cent of the private sector s workforce. Asians are overwhelmingly involved in services and blue collar occupations, while Arabs more often fill managerial posts. Immigration flows to the Kingdom increased significantly over the 2000s, fuelled by high oil prices and the ensuing boom in the construction and services sectors. This demonstrates the difficulty to reconcile labour reforms, and especially, the Bahrainisation of the work force, with the maximisation of economic productivity.
Year 2015
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36 Report

Overcoming the Ethical Dilemmas of Skilled Migration? An Analysis of International Narratives on the "Brain Drain"

Authors Antonina Levatino, Antoine Pecoud
Year 2012
Journal Name American Behavioral Scientist, 2014, Vol. 58, No. 12, pp. 1614-1633
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38 Journal Article

Demography, migration, and the labour market in Oman

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
As of May 27, 2015, estimates of Oman’s total population stood at 4,187,516 persons, of whom 1,849,412 (44.2 per cent) were foreign nationals. Foreign workers are overwhelmingly from the Asian subcontinent: Indians, Bangladeshis and Pakistanis together made up 87 per cent of the workforce in 2013. Eighty-two per cent of all foreign workers were employed in the private sector that year, and 12 per cent were filling managerial and “white collar” posts. The flow of foreign workers to Oman has been rising over the 2000s up till today. Lagging youth employment and rising poverty levels spurred popular protests in 2011 which slowed down economic diversification and the private sector’s development process. However, sectoral Omanisation quotas are now enforced and the hiring of Omani nationals in every business has become mandatory. Aggressive measures also target foreign residents in irregular situation which has led to several massive amnesty and deportation campaigns since 2010.
Year 2015
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40 Report

From nation-building to entrepreneurship: the impact ofélite return migrants in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana

Authors Savina Ammassari
Year 2004
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
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41 Journal Article

Civil Society, the Common Space, and the GFMD

Authors Chukwu-Emeka Chikezie
Book Title Global Perspectives on Migration and Development
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42 Book Chapter

Magnifying our world: Why we must extend civilization to the Moon

Authors TF Rogers
Year 2006
Journal Name SPACE POLICY
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43 Journal Article

All modes lead to home: assessing the state of the remittance art

Authors EMMANUEL YUJUICO
Year 2009
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 8
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44 Journal Article

How does a settler state secure the circuitry of capital?

Authors Shiri Pasternak, Tia Dafnos
Year 2018
Journal Name Environment and Planning D: Society and Space
Citations (WoS) 14
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45 Journal Article

The EU’s External Labour Mobility and Trade—a Multilayered Governance Approach?

Authors Flavia Jurje
Year 2018
Book Title EU external migration policies in an era of global mobilities : intersecting policy universes
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46 Book Chapter

SOURCES ON THE HISTORY OF ETHNIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP OF THE REPUBLIC OF ADYGEA AND THE BLACK SEA IN THE EARLY 1990s

Authors Marina Vitalyevna Belozerova
Year 2019
Journal Name NAUCHNYI DIALOG
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47 Journal Article

Demography, migration and labour market in Saudi Arabia

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
Saudi Arabia is a prime destination and source of remittances from workers for many countries in Asia and the Arab world. As of mid-2013, expatriates made up 32 percent of the Kingdom's population, most of them coming from South Asia. They accounted for 56.5 percent of the employed population and 89 percent of the private sector workforce. Since September 2011, and in spite of a spurt in foreign labour recruitment starting in the mid-2000s, a voluntary policy called Nitaqat aims at 'Saudising' the Kingdom's workforce. The most recent data also show the scale of the irregular migration phenomenon in Saudi Arabia: the amnesty campaign which started in April 2013 allowed 4.7 million foreign workers to regularise their status, while an ongoing crackdown on illegals forced one million to leave the Kingdom in 2013 alone, of which (as of November 30, 2013) 547,000 were deported.
Year 2014
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48 Report

Hukou-based labour market discrimination and ownership structure in urban China

Authors Yang Song
Year 2016
Journal Name Urban Studies
Citations (WoS) 7
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49 Journal Article

The Political Economy of Outsourcing

Authors John Smith
Book Title Vulnerability, Exploitation and Migrants
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50 Book Chapter

Apathy and Color-Blindness in Privatized Immigration Control

Authors Kim Ebert, Wenjie Liao, Emily P. Estrada
Year 2020
Journal Name Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
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52 Journal Article

Women versus the State: Organizing Resistance and Contesting Exploitation in Indonesian Labor Migration to Hong Kong

Authors Amy Sim
Year 2009
Journal Name Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
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53 Journal Article

Asylum in Austere Times: Instability, Privatization and Experimentation within the UK Asylum Dispersal System

Authors Jonathan Darling
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Refugee Studies
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56 Journal Article

Sexualizing Neoliberalism: Identifying Technologies of Privatization, Cleansing, and Scarcity

Authors Jyoti Puri
Year 2016
Journal Name SEXUALITY RESEARCH AND SOCIAL POLICY
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57 Journal Article

Revitalization and tugurization in the historical centre of Santiago de Chile

Authors Axel Borsdorf, Rodrigo Hidalgo
Year 2013
Journal Name Cities
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58 Journal Article

Sidestepping the State: Practices of Social Service Commodification among Nicaraguans in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Authors Caitlin E. Fouratt, Koen Voorend
Year 2018
Journal Name JOURNAL OF LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
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59 Journal Article

The migration industries. A new perspective in the analysis of international migration?

Authors Ana Lopez-Sala
Year 2020
Journal Name EMPIRIA
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60 Journal Article

Migration Governance and Asylum Crises

Principal investigator Lennart Olsson (), Mine Islar (), Anne Jerneck ()
Description
In our part of the project (Work package 6) will investigate the responses given to migration at different scales. It aims to provide an in-depth understanding of responses provided by actors ranging from urban to rural contexts, from transnational city-city collaborations to local community initiatives. Local scale is one of the first spaces where migration needs to be governed. Cities different than governments include networks of public and private sector leaders and institutions that include citizen initiatives, trade unions, private companies and universities, among others. A multi-scalar approach will be implemented by examining three different types of cases (1) The case of urban-rural development in Sweden, via international migration, (2) The case of local migration ecosystems in Northern Italy, (3) The case of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, (4) The case of transnational collaborations and social innovations. By engaging in multi-scalar case studies, the aim is to cover both official and unofficial responses to the so called “refugee crisis”, emphasizing the role of the local authorities in facilitating (or hindering) the application of national policies on reception, redistribution and inclusion/exclusion of newcomers as well as the increasing role of communities and innovations in shaping the migration response by also showing opportunities. These areas, with the potential benefits of interdisciplinary research, will seek synergies between the following two goals; SDG Goal 9 on building resilient infrastructure as well as Goal 11 on inclusive cities. By doing so, we will inform policy making in these areas and potentially contribute to the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Year 2019
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61 Project

Libyan Legislation on Labour: Political Tool or Legalization?

Authors Azza K. MAGHUR
Description
Libya with its 4,000 km of land and 1,700 km of coast frontiers is one of Africa’s main hubs for irregular migrants, especially those en route to Europe. A rich country with high oil revenues, Libya has, on its southern borders, poverty-stricken and unstable sub Saharan countries; and is an attractive destination for neighboring Arab states workers, seeking employment. Libyan foreign policy during the late eighties and the nineties, encouraged African and Arab irregular workers to come to Libya. Their presence was permissible. However, once Libya became an irregular migration hub and certain internal problems came to the surface relating to irregular migration, Libya discovered its lack of legal instruments to face this reality. Moreover, the reactivation of the Libyan private sector after more than a decade of a dominant public sector, led to disorder in the rapidly developing labour market. In labour market terms, Libyan legislative policy was reactive rather than strategic. The Libyan government, including the Ministry of Manpower, issued decisions to better organize the work market, while laws issued in the 1970s and 1980s are still in force and clogging up the system. Moreover, decisions dating from periods of Arab and African enthusiasm remain operative. All this led to discrepancies in Libyan legislation. Libya today is in need of strategic long-term legislative policy towards foreign workers in general, and those in the private sector in particular. Résumé Avec ses 4 000 kilomètres de frontières terrestres et 1 700 kilomètres de frontières côtières, la Libye est un pivot pour les migrants irréguliers, en particulier pour ceux en partance vers l’Europe. Pays riche du fait de ses revenus pétroliers, ses frontières méridionales sont bordées par des Etats subsahariens instables et enserrés dans la pauvreté, et elle constitue une destination attractive pour les travailleurs des pays arabes voisins à la recherche d’un emploi. La politique étrangère libyenne des années 80 et 90 encouragea les travailleurs irréguliers africains et arabes à venir dans le pays. Leur présence était tolérée. Cependant, lorsque la Libye devint un nœud de la migration irrégulière et que certains problèmes internes remontèrent à la surface en ce qui concerne la migration irrégulière, elle découvrit son manque d’instruments juridiques pour faire face à la réalité. De plus, la réactivation du secteur privé libyen après plus d’une décennie de domination du secteur public créa un désordre sur le marché du travail alors en développement rapide. En termes de marché du travail, la politique législative libyenne était plus réactive que stratégique. Des décisions visant une meilleure organisation du marché du travail ont été adoptées par le gouvernement libyen, y compris le ministère de la main d’œuvre, tandis que les lois des années 70 et 80 restent en vigueur et grèvent le système. Les décisions datant des périodes d’enthousiasme arabe et africain demeurent elles aussi opérantes. Tout ceci conduisit à des contradictions dans la législation libyenne. La Libye a aujourd’hui besoin d’une politique législative stratégique sur le long terme concernant les travailleurs étrangers en général, et ceux du secteur privé en particulier.
Year 2009
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63 Report

Outsourcing elderly care to migrant workers : the impact of gender and class on the experience of male employers

Authors Ester GALLO, Francesca SCRINZI
Year 2016
Journal Name Sociology
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66 Journal Article

Job Satisfaction in Public and Private Schools: Competition is Key

Authors Peter Dahler-Larsen, Soren Kjaer Foged
Year 2018
Journal Name Social Policy & Administration
Citations (WoS) 1
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67 Journal Article

Border Externalization in the Western Mediterranean: Mobilities, Violence and the Politics of Compassion

Authors Mercedes G. Jimenez-Alvarez
Year 2015
Journal Name REVISTA DE DIALECTOLOGIA Y TRADICIONES POPULARES
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68 Journal Article

Producing urban industrial derelict places: The case of the Solventul petrochemical plant in Timioara

Authors Sorina Voiculescu, Ioan Sebastian Jucu
Year 2016
Journal Name European Urban and Regional Studies
Citations (WoS) 6
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69 Journal Article

Offshoring in the core: Russian software firms onshoring in the USA

Authors MELANIE FEAKINS
Year 2009
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 3
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70 Journal Article

Neoliberalism confronts Latinos: Paradigmatic shifts in immigration practices

Authors Andrea Silva
Year 2016
Journal Name Latino Studies
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71 Journal Article

Grip houden op publieke belangen. Onderzoek naar privatisering in het migratiebeleid

Authors The Dutch Advisory Committee on Migration Affairs (Adviescommissie voor Vreemdelingenzaken, ACVZ)
Description
Op verzoek van het kabinet heeft de adviesraad de rol van private actoren in het migratiebeleid onderzocht. De centrale vraag daarbij is geweest, hoe en met welke gevolgen privatisering plaatsvindt in het migratiebeleid. Drie casussen zijn voor het onderzoek geselecteerd en zijn in afzonderlijk deeladviezen eerder gepubliceerd. Op 1 juli 2021 is het syntheserapport ‘Grip houden op publieke belangen ‘ gepubliceerd dat de uitkomsten van de drie onderzochte casussen samenbrengt. De overheid blijkt bij het proces en de uitvoering van privatisering binnen het migratiebeleid op een drietal structurele punten duidelijk tekort te schieten: 1) Het borgen van publieke belangen 2) Het realiseren van adequaat toezicht om het gewenste resultaat te kunnen verzekeren en 3) het garanderen van rechtsbescherming. Het eerste advies in deze serie gaat over de verplichtingen bij immigratiecontrole die aan vervoerders (luchtvaartmaatschappijen en rederijen) zijn opgedragen op basis van regelgeving. Het tweede advies gaat over de begeleiding van innovatieve buitenlandse startup-ondernemers in Nederland, de zogenoemde startup-regeling. Het derde advies heeft als onderwerp de borging van de kwaliteit van het inburgeringsonderwijs. Bij het inburgeringsonderwijs is de overheid bijvoorbeeld tekortgeschoten bij het opstellen van kaders. Publieke waarden zijn niet juist geïdentificeerd en gewaarborgd en er is geen toezicht op kwaliteit en effectiviteit. Ook is er sprake van een gebrekkige rechtsbescherming van de inburgeraar. Bij de startup-regeling heeft de overheid eveneens de publieke belangen onvoldoende benoemd, waardoor geen borging mogelijk is. Het beoordelen van de innovativiteit van buitenlandse startup-ondernemingen is volledig aan een private partij (begeleider) overgelaten en de rechtsbescherming van de startup-ondernemer is daardoor beperkt. Uit het onderzoek naar de vervoerdersverplichtingen blijkt dat deze niet bijdragen aan de naleving van de internationale rechtsorde en slechts gericht zijn op het borgen van de nationale veiligheid en openbare orde. Er bestaat voor hen geen verplichting om de weigering van niet of onjuist gedocumenteerde passagiers die asielmotieven aanvoeren, voor te leggen aan de Immigratie- en Naturalisatiedienst. De rechtsbescherming van vreemdelingen komt daarmee in het geding. De drie onderzochte casussen betreffen steeds een andere fase in het migratiebeleid, kennen een andere vorm van privatisering en laten verschillende mechanismen zien om private actoren bij de behartiging van publieke belangen te betrekken. Deze aanpak geeft onderzoekstechnisch een zo compleet mogelijk beeld. De overheid moet volgens de adviesraad nadrukkelijk heroverwegen hoe om te gaan met privatisering binnen het migratiebeleid. Daarom beveelt de ACVZ aan om bij privatisering steeds minstens drie kerncriteria als uitgangspunt te gebruiken: Borging, Toezicht en Rechtsbescherming. Ook bestaande privatiseringen moet de overheid, volgens de adviesraad, op die manier opnieuw beoordelen. Alleen dan houdt de overheid de noodzakelijke grip op publieke belangen.
Year 2021
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72 Report

Demography, migration, and the labour market in the UAE

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
The objective of the paper is to draw a sketch of UAE’s population and migration dynamics, using the scarce data available from the federal and emirate-level statistical bureaus. In 2010, expatriates in the UAE were estimated to number 7,316,073 persons, twenty times the 1975’s figure of 356,343. Foreign nationals thus made up 88.5 per cent of the country’s total population; most were believed to come from Asia and especially from India. In the employed population, foreign nationals accounted for an even larger share (96 per cent of the Dubai’s employed population in 2011). Non-Emiratis comprised 40 per cent of the UAE’s public sector’s workforce in 2013, but as much as 99.5 per cent of those employed in the private sector. Unlike in other GCC states, a quarter of working expatriates were in managerial posts, employed across all activities’ spectrum. Expatriates’ demographic expansion mounted during the 2000s, a period of spectacular economic growth fuelled by soaring oil prices. Since 2008’s financial downturn, however, the economy recovered and the hiring of foreign workers has resumed, stimulated by large-scale projects such as Dubai’s Expo 2020. Nonetheless, reforms in immigration policies are now undertaken, fuelled by security concerns and pressures from human rights’ protection bodies. The reality of some expatriates’ settlement is also witnessed in numbers (expatriate children aged 0-14 outnumbered Emirati children already in 2005), while mixed marriages are acknowledged in policies: some naturalisations of children of Emirati mothers have been performed since 2011.
Year 2015
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73 Report

Longer-Term Consequences of ‘Youth’ Migration: Japanese Temporary Migrants in China and the Life Course

Authors Kumiko Kawashima
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of Intercultural Studies
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74 Journal Article

The Commercialization of Migration Control

Authors Rutvica Andrijasevic
Book Title Citizenship and its Others
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75 Book Chapter

International outsourcing of services: A partnership model

Authors Ben L. Kedia, Somnath Lahiri
Year 2007
Journal Name Journal of International Management
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76 Journal Article

Cross-Border Migration and Human Trafficking in Ethiopia: Contributing Factors, Policy Responses and the Way Forward

Authors Messay M. Tefera
Year 2019
Journal Name Fudan journal of the humanities and social sciences, 2018, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 323-339
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77 Journal Article

Four Centuries of Translocal Development in Cities and Regions in Northwest Germany

Authors Kees Terlouw
Year 2013
Journal Name Globalizations
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78 Journal Article

Pension prospects of minority ethnic groups: inequalities by gender and ethnicity

Authors Jay Ginn, Sara Arber
Year 2001
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
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79 Journal Article

IMPACT OF RESTORATION IN HANOI FRENCH COLONIAL QUARTER

Authors R PARENTEAU, Fredrick Charbonneau, PK TOAN, ...
Year 1995
Journal Name Cities
Citations (WoS) 11
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80 Journal Article

IMPACT OF RESTORATION IN HANOI FRENCH COLONIAL QUARTER

Authors R PARENTEAU, PK TOAN, NB DANG, ...
Year 1995
Journal Name Cities
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81 Journal Article

Water privatization, hegemony and civil society: What Motivates Individuals to Protest About Water Privatization?

Authors Cory Fletcher, Anja van Heelsum, Conny Roggeband
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of Civil Society
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82 Journal Article

Developing a Knowledge Base for Policy-Making on India-EU Migration: Skill matching

Authors Göran HULTIN
Description
The majority of the Skill Matching mechanisms relating to India EU migration do not provide the full functions that the commercial Skill Matching model seeks to offer. Only commercial Skill Matching can really be regarded as a model that is intentional, sophisticated and leading best practice in the field and that is aiding the matching of skills and jobs from India to the EU. The commercial Skill Matching predominately serves, however, the high skilled and professional migrant. Whilst leading global recruitment companies practice the model worldwide, the size of practice relative to the size of the market is small and only begins to scratch the surface in comparison to the force and size of the market driving mechanism influencing Indian labour migration to the EU. Consequently, both semi-skilled and un/low-skilled migrants generally fail to benefit from such mechanisms of leading Skill Matching. They therefore rely on Skill Matching practices that are indirect or unintentional in their nature. However, even where perfectly organized Skill Matching channels are not in place, market mechanisms and immigration selection systems have had a tendency to create some of the same dimensions that an intentional Skill Matching model comprises. There is a demand particularly for medium skills in Europe and governments globally are beginning to recognize the gap of a Skill Matching mechanism for this skill category of migrants by taking action through the creation of mechanisms with partners such as the private sector to facilitate intentional Skill Matching, however, this work is just beginning to take momentum and substantial work remains.
Year 2012
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84 Report

Return of Overseas Contract Workers and their Rehabilitation and Development in Kerala (India)

Authors P.R. Gopinathan Nair
Year 1999
Journal Name International Migration
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85 Journal Article

Achievements and current challenges regarding public utilities' regulation in Brazil

Authors Matthias FINGER, Patrícia SAMPAIO, Joisa DUTRA, ...
Description
This Special Issue of the Network Industries Quarterly focuses on Brazil. The goal is to provide readers with an overview of the main achievements and current challenges faced by public utilities’ regulation in the country. Brazil is the seventh largest economy in the world in terms of GDP. As a consequence of the privatization program launched in the 1990s, a significant portion of public services was transferred to private investors under long-term concession agreements. This was the case of transmission and distribution of electricity, roads, railroads and telecommunications. However, despite privatization, the State remains an important player in sectors such as electricity and oil & gas, which increases the complexity of regulation considering an environment in which State-owned companies interact with private investors. This volume of Network Industries Quarterly consists of five papers that shall provide readers with a broad sense of what happened in terms of public utilities’ investment in Brazil in the last two decades and some trends for the future.
Year 2016
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86 Report

Global Software Development: Commitment, Trust and Cultural Sensitivity in Strategic Partnerships

Authors Anne-Marie Søderberg, S. Krishna, Pernille Bjørn
Year 2013
Journal Name Journal of International Management
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88 Journal Article

Turning the Table on the Exploitative Recruitment of Migrant Workers: The Cambodian Experience

Authors Jenna K. Holliday
Year 2012
Journal Name ASIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
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89 Journal Article

Mobile pastoralism on the brink of land privatization in Northern Côte d’Ivoire

Authors Thomas J. Bassett
Year 2009
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 25
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90 Journal Article

Big Business in a Thin Market: Understanding the Privatization of Residential Care for Children and Youth in Sweden

Authors Gabrielle Meagher, Tommy Lundstrom, Marie Sallnas, ...
Year 2016
Journal Name Social Policy & Administration
Citations (WoS) 4
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91 Journal Article

Racial Income Inequality and Public Sector Privatization

Authors George Wilson, Vincent J. Roscigno, Matt Huffman
Year 2015
Journal Name Social Problems
Citations (WoS) 17
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92 Journal Article

China's Continuing Urban Transition

Authors Clifton W Pannell
Year 2002
Journal Name Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
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93 Journal Article

Structuring access to higher education: The role of differentiation and privatization

Authors Josipa Roksa
Year 2008
Journal Name Research in Social Stratification and Mobility
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94 Journal Article

Privatizing the production of settler colonial landscapes: ‘Authenticity’ and imaginative geography in Wadi Al-Salib, Haifa

Authors Yara Sa’di-Ibraheem
Year 2020
Journal Name Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space
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96 Journal Article

Indoor Contamination with Flame Retardant Chemicals: Causes and Impacts

Description
The main research goal is to further understanding of how and to what extent flame retardant (FR) chemicals used in every-day consumer goods and construction materials enter humans and of the risk to health that such exposure presents. Our vision is that this enhanced understanding will inform assessment of risk associated both with recent and current-use flame retardant chemicals, and of those under development, and ultimately lead to more sustainable approaches to meeting fire safety regulations. Our principal objectives are to discover: (1) the mechanisms via which FRs migrate from products within which they are incorporated; (2) how and to what extent such migration leads to human exposure; and (3) the effects of such exposure. To achieve our goal and objectives we will use a range of state-of-the-art techniques associated with analytical chemistry, electron microscopy, mathematical modelling, in vitro toxicology, and “omics”. The network is an interdisciplinary cooperative of chemists, biologists, physicists and toxicologists. Intersectoral aspects unite basic and applied scientists working in universities, two SMEs, a large (non-university) public sector research organisation and a government research institute. The project’s S&T objectives will be delivered through research in 3 Work Packages (WPs): viz. WP1- Migration pathways, WP2- Human exposure (pathways and monitoring), and WP3- Understanding effects of human exposure. The aim of the Training Programme is to increase the knowledge base and experience of trainees in the different research areas and to develop their transferable skills for future careers in the private sector, public sector, or the regulatory community. Six training objectives will be delivered through a suite of 6 Core Skills Areas (Research Project, Advanced Training Courses, Project Meetings, Career Development Plan, Generic Research Skills, Transferable Research Skills).
Year 2011
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97 Project

Highly-skilled Migration (Libya): Legal aspects

Authors Azza K. MAGHUR
Description
Libya, a country that gained independence in 1951, has known only two contradictory regimes: a monarchy from 1951-1969, and a revolution since 1969. With oil as its main source of revenue, and after ten years of UN backed-sanctions, in addition to a decade of public sector dominance, Libya suffers from both brain drain and brain waste. The active Libyan market of today, after its return to the international community, and given decades of economic and administrative instability, requires skilled and unskilled labour. Libya’s labour policies have always been motivated by politics. There has not been a labour strategy, and the need for skilled labour has been a constant in a rich country with only six million inhabitants.Libya today is country full of promise that offers opportunities to its own citizens. It is still, however, unable either to contain brain waste, or to stop brain drain, especially in the medical field. The private sector which has been reactivated after years of public sector dominance is hungry for labour and regulation is imminent. Economic activities, in infrastructure and building for example, need the labour market, private and public, to be properly regulated. La Libye, devenue indépendante en 1951, n’a connu que deux régimes opposés : une monarchie de 1951 à 1969 et une révolution depuis 1969. Avec le pétrole comme principale source de revenu, après dix ans de sanctions onusiennes, et une décennie de prédominance du secteur public, la Libye subit à la fois une fuite et un gaspillage des cerveaux. Le marché du travail libyen actuel requiert de la main d’oeuvre qualifiée et non qualifiée depuis son retour sur la scène internationale après des décennies d’instabilité économique et administrative. Les politiques de l’emploi libyennes ont toujours été motivées par la politique. En l’absence de stratégie de l’emploi, le besoin de main d’œuvre est une constante dans ce pays riche pourvu de seulement six millions d’habitants.La Libye d’aujourd’hui est un pays plein de promesses, porteur d’opportunités pour ses citoyens. Elle est cependant encore incapable de réduire le gaspillage des cerveaux et de stopper la fuite des cerveaux, surtout dans le domaine médical. Le secteur privé, réactivé après des décennies de domination publique, a faim de main d’œuvre et la régulation est imminente. Les activités économiques, dans les infrastructures ou le bâtiment par exemple, ont besoin d’un marché du travail, public comme privé, réglementé.
Year 2010
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
98 Report

Labour-market assimilation of foreign workers in Italy

Authors Alessandra Venturini, Claudia Villosio
Year 2008
Journal Name OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
100 Journal Article
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