Switzerland

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Germanophobia in Switzerland

Principal investigator Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives This project considers two common assumptions that arise in the empirical literature on xenophobia—namely that xenophobic attitudes are found mostly among the poorly educated, and that xenophobia mainly concerns immigrants from low social classes and from geographically and culturally disparate nations. These arguments are discussed in the context of the migration of high-skilled Germans to Switzerland, a phenomenon that has increased markedly in the last few years, leading to major controversies. One might expect that the Swiss do not perceive Germans as a cultural threat as they are, at least at first sight, culturally similar. This argument can however be questioned in two ways. We first have to differentiate between objective similarity and subjectively perceived dissimilarity. As it turns out, the cultural difference between Germans and Swiss-Germans is considered to be very large in Switzerland. Second, some argue that boundaries between groups that are culturally very close are not necessarily less fragile. In a second step we question the common generalisation that working class people are more often xenophobic because they fear that immigrants take their jobs. As we are confronted in the case at hand with highly educated immigrants, it might be that in this case well-educated people in high positions feel threatened by the new arrivals. This would disconfirm the argument according to which better-educated people are more tolerant as they are more open-minded and have more cognitive capacities for differentiated perceptions. Research design, data and methodology To investigate our arguments both quantitative and qualitative data are analysed. In a first step, data from a survey conducted in the city of Zurich between October 1994 and March will be analysed. This is so far the only survey that includes relevant questions about German immigrants. More recent data on this topic will be collected in the context of the 2011 Swiss electoral survey (see project 2.5 above). Moreover, data from five focus group interviews with Swiss and Germans will be analysed. On the one hand, this allows us to better understand which arguments Swiss use to justify attitudes towards Germans and which aspects they dislike/criticise for which reasons. On the other hand, we will be in the position to study how Germans think about Swiss, why Germans migrated to Switzerland and how they feel abroad. Findings It turned out that German immigrants put in danger Swiss characteristics as much as immigrants from the Balkans. Socio-economic factors turned out to be relevant, too. Contrary to many other studies I found that education does not improve attitudes towards Germans. At the same time, I found that people who are young and seek to improve their job position are significantly more Germanophobic than those who are satisfied with their current job situation and are already established. It appears that as much as low-skilled workers fear that poorly educated immigrants take their jobs, well-educated Swiss consider German immigrants as competitors on the job market."
Year 2009
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1 Project

Country report : Switzerland

Authors Alberto ACHERMANN, Christin ACHERMANN, Gianni D'AMATO, ...
Year 2010
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2 Report

Jobs for immigrants (Vol. 3)

Authors Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Description
Labour Market Integration in Austria, Norway and Switzerland
Year 2012
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3 Report

Immigration and Integration Policy in Switzerland, 1848 to 2014

Authors Didier Ruedin, Camilla Alberti, Gianni D'Amato
Year 2015
Journal Name Swiss Political Science Review
Citations (WoS) 13
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4 Journal Article

Media content analysis of the Indian community in Switzerland

Authors Ivan OBADIĆ
Description
This report outlines the findings of a two-year analysis of media coverage of the Indian community in Switzerland. The focus of this study is on issues related to business/investment, crime, education, labour market, culture, integration initiatives and religion. The analysis revealed that the Indian community in Switzerland receives relatively little attention in the media.
Year 2015
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5 Report

Work-related Travel over the Life Course and Its Link to Fertility: A Comparison between Four European Countries

Authors Heiko Rueger, Gil Viry
Year 2017
Journal Name European Sociological Review
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8 Journal Article

Naturalisations procedures for immigrants : Switzerland

Authors Noemi CARELL, Nicole WICHMANN
Year 2013
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9 Report

Foreigners, citizens and the tyrannical edges of the 'Vox Populi' : empirical and normative evidence from Switzerland

Authors Jean-Thomas ARRIGHI, Universitat Pompeu Fabra : Departament de Ciències Polítiques i Socials
Year 2017
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10 Working Paper

Study on health care for undocumented migrants in Switzerland

Description
The study is implemented parallel to the EU-wide project "Health Care in Nowhereland-Improving Services for Undocumented Migrants in the EU" (funded by DG SANCO and coordinated by the Danube University Krems), which analyses the regulatory frameworks, health care practices and migrant strategies in 27 EU countries. The results of the Swiss study will be integrated into the EU project. Objectives • To situate the Swiss case in the wider European context • To work out the main similarities and differences between the respective national health care systems and practices at the intersection of welfare and irregular migration Outcomes • Analysis of the national regulatory and financial framework to which the respective health care institutions dealing with “undocumented” migrants are bound to act • Collection of data on different practices of administrations and health care institutions providing health care to "undocumented" migrants • Identification of transferable best practice models • Overview of the various health problems “undocumented” migrants show and how these migrants manoeuvre in order to get the medical assistance needed
Year 2008
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13 Project

Political Opportunity Structures (POS)

Description
The database consists of data on the political opportunity structure (POS) in 7 Western European countries (Austria, Belgium, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and United Kingdom) between 1990 and 2009. A number of indicators are included to cover generic and issue-specific political opportunity structures (immigration-related). The data were collected as part of the FP7-funded project Support and Opposition to Migration.
Year 2010
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14 Data Set

Recent trends in migrants' flows and stocks

Authors Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Description
Recent trends in migrants' flows and stocks 2005, 2010, 2015, 2016, 2017 Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.
Year 2018
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15 Data Set

Report addendum

Authors Doudou Diène, UN. Human Rights Council. Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance
Description
The Special Rapporteur observed two underlying causes for the dynamic of racism and xenophobia in Switzerland: deep-rooted cultural resistance within Swiss society to the multiculturalization process, especially where persons of South-Eastern European and non-European origin are concerned, and the growing prevalence of racist and xenophobic stances in political programmes and discourse, particularly during elections and various votes.
Year 2007
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16 Report

Equal Outcomes, but Different Treatment – Subtle Discrimination in Email Responses From a Correspondence Test in Switzerland

Authors Eva Zschirnt
Year 2019
Journal Name Swiss Journal of Sociology
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17 Journal Article

Migration Integration Policy Index

Principal investigator Migration Policy Group (MPG) ()
Description
MIPEX is a unique tool to compare and evaluate governments’ integration policies in all EU Member States and several non-EU countries (Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey and the USA). 167 policy indicators have been developed to create a rich, multi-dimensional picture of migrants’ opportunities to participate in society. The index is a useful tool to evaluate and compare what governments are doing to promote the integration of migrants in all the countries analysed.
Year 2007
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19 Project

Obtaining Party Positions on Immigration in Switzerland: Comparing Different Methods

Authors Didier Ruedin
Year 2013
Journal Name Swiss Political Science Review
Citations (WoS) 18
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20 Journal Article

Evidence of Hiring Discrimination Against the Second Generation: Results from a Correspondence Test in the Swiss Labour Market

Authors Eva Zschirnt
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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21 Journal Article

Regimes for granting the right to use hydropower in Europe

Authors Jean-Michel GLACHANT, Marcelo SAGUAN, Vincent RIOUS, ...
Description
Over the last decade, the European Commission has launched several procedures concerning the compatibility of hydropower right granting with European laws and regulations in several countries (e.g. France, Spain, Italy, Portugal, etc.). Meanwhile, other hydropower regimes (e.g. in Austria or Sweden) are not subject of such investigations despite not being grounded on competitive process. This difference of treatment raises questions about the drivers of the European Commission actions. Understanding and grabbing the main differences between the national hydropower regimes is then of particular interest. This report aims at providing a benchmarking of hydropower concession regimes in Europe, describing hydropower regimes in 14 European countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Finland, France, Germany, Great-Britain, Greece, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland) and regions when appropriate (e.g. cantons in Switzerland or Lands/States in Germany). This report describes and scrutinizes hydropower regimes through a unified analysis framework to ensure their comparison on an equal basis. This framework is structured around 4 blocks: 1. The institutional framework of hydropower regimes (e.g. type of rights to use hydropower, authorities granting rights to use hydropower, etc.) 2. The framework for granting right to use hydropower (duration of rights and procedure, competitive process and existence of a possible EC infringement procedure). 3. The obligations of the hydropower operator (environmental and investment obligations and royalties). 4. Small hydro characterisation and support schemes.
Year 2015
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22 Report

Rapid Asylum Inflow Alert System

Description
Objectives • To analyse on a regular basis trends of asylum related flows in 11 countries - Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland (ICMPD Member States). • To understand the main problems in terms of reliability and comparability of data Outcomes • Continuous evaluation on trends of asylum related flows based on: • Analysis of available data and definitions used by ICMPD Member States • Data management and data exchange mechanisms applied by ICMPD Member States.
Year 2010
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23 Project

Options for reforming preliminary admission of migrants

Description
In Switzerland, preliminarily admitted individuals should in principle leave the country. Their departure may however not be enforced for a range of reasons. Although preliminary admission does not attribute a residence status in a legal sense, more than 20.000 persons are to remain in that condition until the moment the reasons impeding their return are no longer applicable. During this time, however, individuals are not supposed to integrate economically, socially and politically, thus have to rely on public support. Despite their dependence on social benefits, persons subject to preliminary admission are expected to rely upon such benefits as little as possible – regardless of the fact that, in principle, constitutional guarantees safeguard their access to subsistence. Access to benefits in turn, is strongly connected with language acquisition and economic participation, which are enhanced via integration measures. Against this background, thousands of persons are kept in between these two opposing objectives. In the past few years, the number of preliminary admissions has even outgrown the number of those granted asylum protection. The majority of individuals remain in that legal limbo situation for more than seven years, until eventually a right to remain may be granted by the respective canton of residence. The present study aims to elaborate options to reform the legal institution of preliminary admission in Switzerland. In particular, it looks into ways to secure compliance with international protection standards without losing sight of the possibility of return, while simultaneously taking into account the ongoing integration processes entailed by long-term stay and, deeply connected with that, pressing questions on residential security. Based on the assessment of legal frameworks addressing that issue in comparable European states, the study not only explores the question of residence status acquisition and criteria relevant to its accession, but also addresses the legal position of persons, admitted via the current framework of preliminary admission in Switzerland. Objectives The study explores the situation of persons: • Who are in need of protection according to international conventions, but were neither granted asylum nor temporary protection; • Who cannot be incited to leave the country on humanitarian grounds but at the same time cannot obtain a residence permit; • Whose return decision cannot be enforced for technical reasons which lie outside of the area of influence of the person concerned; • Whose return decision cannot be enforced for reasons lying outside the area of influence of the person concerned; • Whose return decision is already in force and whose respite for departure was postponed on multiple occasions over a longer time-span, but who were neither granted preliminary admission nor a residence status, consequently leaving them in a vulnerable position.
Year 2012
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25 Project

The construction of personal geographies among Romanian older migrants in Switzerland

Authors Ruxandra Oana Ciobanu, Claudio Bolzman
Year 2019
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
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26 Journal Article

The regional battleground : partisanship as a key driver of the subnational contestation of citizenship

Authors Lorenzo PICCOLI
Year 2019
Journal Name Ethnopolitics
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27 Journal Article

Beyond work ethic : religion, individual, and political preferences

Authors Christoph BASTEN, Frank BETZ
Year 2013
Journal Name American economic journal : economic policy, 2013, Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 67-91
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28 Journal Article

Job Mobilities and Family Lives in Europe Modern Mobile Living and its Relation to Quality of Life

Authors Norbert F. Schneider, Beate Collet, Gerardo Meil Landwerlin, ...
Description
Beim JobMob-Survey handelt es sich um ein auf europäischer Ebene international vergleichendes Projekt, in dessen Fokus die Verbreitung sowie die Ursachen und Konsequenzen beruflich bedingter räumlicher Mobilität in Europa stehen. Eine erste Erhebung fand im Jahr 2007 in den sechs Ländern Belgien, Frankreich, Spanien, Schweiz, Polen und Deutschland statt. Insgesamt wurden 7.220 zufällig ausgewählte Personen befragt. Realisiert wurde die von der EU geförderte Studie im Rahmen eines Kooperationsnetzwerkes von Wissenschaftlern in den beteiligten Ländern. Ziel der ersten Erhebungsphase war die Beschreibung der gegenwärtigen Verbreitung berufsbedingter räumlicher Mobilität, wie tägliches Fernpendeln, Geschäftsreisen oder berufsbedingte Umzüge, in ausgewählten Ländern Europas auf Basis repräsentativer Daten. Darüber hinaus sollten detaillierte Erkenntnisse über die Ursachen und Entstehungszusammenhänge berufsbedingter räumlicher Mobilität ebenso wie über die Folgen von Mobilität für das subjektive Wohlbefinden, das Familienleben sowie für die soziale Teilhabe gewonnen werden. Das Projekt befasst sich dazu in einer integrierenden Perspektive mit einem breiten Spektrum unterschiedlicher Erscheinungsformen beruflich bedingter räumlicher Mobilität. Grundlegend lassen sich die diversen Mobilitätsformen danach unterscheiden, ob Mobilität singulär (Umzugsmobilität) oder wiederholt (zirkuläre Mobilität) auftritt. Als eine Form der Umzugsmobilität wurden die so genannten Recent Relocators identifiziert, die aus beruflichen Gründen innerhalb der letzten drei Jahre vor dem Befragungszeitpunkt der ersten Welle über mindestens 50 Kilometer hinweg umgezogen sind. Darüber hinausgehend wurden folgende zirkulären Mobilitätsformen identifiziert: Fernpendler sind beim Pendeln zur Arbeit hin und zurück mindestens 120 Minuten unterwegs und pendeln mindestens dreimal pro Woche. Übernachter (Overnighter) haben berufsbedingt während der letzten 12 Monate mindestens 60 Nächte außer Haus verbracht. Die Gruppe der Übernachter lässt sich in die folgenden drei Untergruppen differenzieren: Shuttlers verfügen berufsbedingt über einen festen Zweitwohnsitz am Arbeitsort. Der Hauptwohnsitz wird normalerweise am Wochenende aufgesucht. Fernbeziehungen unterhalten zwei eigenständige Haushalte. Die Fernbeziehung ist eine Folge beruflicher Mobilitätserfordernisse. Die Pendeldauer zwischen den Haushalten beträgt mindestens 60 Minuten. Varimobile üben einen Beruf aus, dessen Anforderungsprofil explizit oder implizit Mobilität voraussetzt. Sie sind beruflich viel unterwegs (zum Beispiel auf Geschäftsreisen) und müssen deshalb relativ häufig auswärts übernachten. Multi-Mobile sind in mindestens zwei der beschriebenen Formen zugleich mobil. Um detaillierte und weiterführende Analysen zu ermöglichen, wurde die Studie in Deutschland im Jahr 2010 sowie in Frankreich, der Schweiz und in Spanien in den Jahren 2011 und 2012 um eine zweite Erhebungswelle erweitert. Neben einer Wiederholungsbefragung (n=1.735) von Personen, die bereits 2007 befragt wurden (Panelstudie), ergänzt eine Zusatzbefragung räumlich hochmobiler Personen, die in den Ländern Frankreich und Deutschland erhoben wurde, den Datenbestand (n=499). Diese zweite Erhebungswelle bietet neben umfangreichen retrospektiv erhobenen Informationen zu räumlicher Mobilität, Erwerbstätigkeit, Familie und Partnerschaft auch Informationen zu neuen Themengebieten wie soziale Integration, bürgerschaftliches Engagement und soziale Mobilität. Die Querschnittsdaten der ersten Welle können unter der Studiennummer ZA 5065 und die Längsschnittdaten der zweiten Welle unter der Studiennummer ZA5066 bei GESIS angefordert werden.
Year 2006
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31 Data Set

Muslims’ religiosity and views on religion in six Western European countries: does national context matter?

Authors Corinne Torrekens, Dirk Jacobs
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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33 Journal Article

Benchmark study on asylum practices in Switzerland, Denmark and United Kingdom regarding Iraqi, Somali and Eritrean asylum seekers

Principal investigator Martin Wagner (Project Coordinator)
Description
The Swiss Federal Office for Migration (BFM) has commissioned the ICMPD to undertake a comparative study of asylum procedures in Switzerland, Denmark and United Kingdom regarding claims of particularly Iraqi, Somali and Eritrean asylum seekers. Objectives The study aims to comparatively describe current developments in asylum policies and practices in the selected countries and to relate them to: • changes in the number of asylum claims submitted by the target group • changes in the perception of attractiveness of the destination countries: CH, DK, UK Outcomes • Comparative analysis of asylum and return policies in CH, DK, UK. • Statistical analysis on asylum claims of Iraqi, Somali and Eritrean asylum seekers submitted in CH, DK, UK.
Year 2008
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37 Project

Partei ergreifen: Protest gegen die Abschiebung von AsylbewerberInnen. Ein Vergleich zwischen Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz

Principal investigator Helen Schwenken (Principal Investigator), Sieglinde Rosenberger (Principal Investigator), Gianni d'Amato (Principal Investigator)
Description
"The project explores protest against the deportation of rejected asylum seekers in Austria, Switzerland and Germany. Deportation has become a central element of immigration control, particularly of asylum seekers whose application has been rejected. At the same time, it can be seen as contradicting the intention of human rights obligations for individuals in need of protection, which raises normative questions related to justice and universal norms vis-à-vis state sovereignty and policy implementation adopted by lawful means. This tension is reflected by the fact that certain sections of the population and the public have become sensitive towards the forcible expulsion of non-citizens from the state territory. Such feelings of unease and moral outrage manifest themselves in various forms of protest that are directed against the most coercive measure a sovereign state can take. The central aim of the project is to explore and explain the goals, form and degree of diverse anti-deportation protest activities across countries and time (1995-2010). In particular, the project seeks to answer the following research questions: 1.What shapes the trajectories of protest against the deportation of asylum seekers and what is characteristic and even distinct about anti-deportation protest? 2. How can we explain variation in the goals, forms, and degree of anti-deportation protest, both across countries and over time? The project develops an innovative and integrated perspective by combining different theoretical approaches (political opportunity structure approach and resource mobilization perspective) and considering emotional processes into the analysis. Empirically, the study will be based on newspaper articles about deportation, protest material produced by protest groups and interviews with protesters. In methodological terms, the project combines quantitative and qualitative text analysis with a series of in-depth case studies on individual deportation cases that triggered protest. The project will make an important contribution to the literature on migration and social movements. More specifically, we will assess (a) the role of structural factors vis-à-vis agency and resources and (b) the motivational and strategic functions that emotions play in protest. "
Year 2013
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41 Project

Estimating party positions on immigration: Assessing the reliability and validity of different methods

Authors Didier Ruedin, Laura Morales
Year 2019
Journal Name Party Politics
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44 Journal Article

Forced migration in Belarus

Authors Liudmila SHAKHOTSKA, Anastacia BOBROVA
Description
There is limited information on the number of forced migrants from Belarus. Key information can be found in the statistical publications of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Belarusian office of this organization gives the following explanation: “countries are guided by the principle of confidentiality of information submitted by an applicant. Public bodies of the asylum country have no right to transfer or provide any personal information about an application to his/her state of citizenship” (Delovaya Gazeta, 2013). According to UNHCR, the total number of persons from Belarus applying for refugee status, asylum or complementary protection was 6839 in 2011 and 6194 in 2012 (UNHCR, 2012; UNHCR, 2013). European countries (the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland) and the USA were their countries of preference. Some estimates are available at the websites of Eurostat and US National Security Agency. According to the data for 1998-2007, 16255 citizens of Belarus sought asylum in EU member states (Eurostat Statistics). The main recipient countries were Germany, the United Kingdom, Sweden, France, the Czech Republic and Austria. The US National Security Agency also posts data on Belarusian refugees who arrived in the US territory. According to its estimates, there were 2844 of them 2003-2012 (Department of Homeland Security: 2012)
Year 2013
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46 Report

Part of the problem or of the solution? The involvement of religious associations in immigrant integration policy

Authors Astrid Mattes
Year 2017
Journal Name Austrian Journal of Political Science
Citations (WoS) 1
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47 Journal Article

Recruitment Policies of Non-EU/EEA Nurses and Ethical Issues

Authors Angèle Flora Mendy
Year 2018
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49 Book

POUR UNE HISTOIRE COMPAREE ET TRANSNATIONALE DES DESTINES AUX EXILES ET REFUGIES POLITIQUES DANS L'EUROPE DU XIXE SIECLE (1815-1870)

Principal investigator Delphine Diaz (Coordinator)
Description
L’Europe du XIXe siècle voit l’institutionnalisation de l’exil comme forme de mobilisation. L’augmentation du nombre d’opposants chassés de leur pays pour des motifs politiques a induit de profondes transformations des politiques migratoires adoptées en Grande-Bretagne, en France, en Belgique, en Suisse, dans le Piémont-Sardaigne et en Espagne, principaux pays concernés par l’asile politique entre le congrès de Vienne et les années 1870. Le programme AsileuropeXIX s’emploie à reconstituer le lexique utilisé pour qualifier les exilés et réfugiés, prêtant attention aux catégories ainsi élaborées. Un second pan de nos recherches collectives concernant l’accueil qui leur était réservé porte sur les contrôles des exilés aux frontières, étudiés à partir de sources administratives et policières et d’archives personnelles. L’analyse des dispositifs d’accueil, qui est menée à la fois par le haut et par le bas met en évidence les points de comparaison entre les six pays d’asile étudiés. Le programme AsileuropeXIX s’intéresse enfin au contrôle migratoire a posteriori des migrations politiques, qui s’appuyait sur les mesures d’expulsion mais aussi sur les incitations au départ vers les colonies européennes.
Year 2016
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50 Project

REGINE: Regularisations in Europe: Study on practices in the area of regularisation of illegally staying third-country nationals in the Member States of the EU

Description
REGINE is a research project on regularisation practices in the European Union. In order to gain insights in regularisation practices and the impact of regularisations elsewhere two additional non-EU countries– Switzerland and the US – has been also covered. Objectives: 1) To provide a thorough mapping of practices relating to the regularisation of third country nationals illegally resident in EU Member States. 2) To investigate the relationship of regularisation policies to the overall migration policy framework, including to protection issues and refugee policies. 3) To examine the political position of different stakeholders towards regularisation policies on the national level. 4) To examine potential options for policies on regularisation on the European level, incorporating Member States as well as other stakeholders’ views on possible instruments on the European level. NOTE: Data for the project has been gathered through a questionnaire addressed to EU Member States and additional questionnaires addressed to NGOs and Trade Unions.
Year 2007
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51 Project

Politicising Europe : integration and mass politics

Authors Swen HUTTER, Edgar GRANDE, Hanspeter KRIESI
Year 2016
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56 Book

How well can we estimate immigration trends using Google data?

Authors Philippe Wanner
Year 2020
Journal Name Quality & Quantity
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57 Journal Article

‘We are Facilitating States!’ An Ethnographic Analysis of the ICMPD

Authors Sabine Hess
Book Title The Politics of International Migration Management
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61 Book Chapter

“Unpacking” the Identity-to-Politics Link: The Effects of Social Identification on Voting Among Muslim Immigrants in Western Europe

Authors Maria Kranendonk, Floris Vermeulen, Anja van Heelsum
Year 2018
Journal Name Political Psychology
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62 Journal Article

International Migration Policy and Law Analysis (IMPALA)

Description
The International Migration Policy And Law Analysis (IMPALA) Database is a cross-national, cross-institutional, cross-disciplinary project on comparative immigration policy. The pilot database version covers 10 years and 9 country cases including Australia, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States of America. It covers The focus is admission policy, although the authors include also acquisition of citizenship, which is generally understood as being part of ‘immigrant policies’, namely what happens after admission. The project classifies and measures tracks of entry associated with five migration categories: economic migration, family reunification, asylum and humanitarian migration, and student migration, as well as acquisition of citizenship. It is the product of an international collaboration between researchers from George Mason University, Harvard University, London School of Economics and Political Science, Paris School of Economics, University of Amsterdam, University of Luxembourg, and University of Sydney.
Year 2008
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66 Data Set

Family Development and Residential Trajectories of Two Birth Cohorts Living in Switzerland: Between Individualization and Standardization

Authors Jacques-Antoine Gauthier, Gil Viry
Year 2019
Journal Name Swiss Journal of Sociology
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67 Journal Article

Who responds to protest? : protest politics and party responsiveness in Western Europe

Authors Swen HUTTER, Rens VLIEGENTHART
Year 2018
Journal Name Party Politics
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68 Journal Article

Selecting the highly skilled: norms and practices of the Swiss admission system for non-EU immigrants

Authors Metka Hercog, Laure Sandoz
Year 2018
Journal Name Migration Letters
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69 Journal Article

Evaluation of Immigration- and Integration Policies

Principal investigator Daniel Auer (Principal Investigator ), Flavia Fossati (Principal Investigator ), Carlos Vargas-Silva (Principal Investigator ), Stefanie Kurt (Principal Investigator ), Dennis Egger (Principal Investigator ), Johannes Kunz (Principal Investigator ), Damaris Rose (Principal Investigator )
Description
"In this project, we investigate the (sometimes unintended) consequences of policies that have been implemented to regulate immigration and to subsequently facilitate the socio-economic integration of newly arrived immigrants. (1) Networks: First, we exploit a natural experiment in Switzerland, where asylum seekers are randomly assigned to cantons. This immigration policy can be regarded as a transparent and neutral way of distributing refugees across a country to “share a burden”. At the same time, such restrictions regarding free movement within a country come with hefty consequences for the persons affected. On the one hand, a large share of jobs are found through referrals within social networks: in the US, for instance, around 30-60% (Bewley, 2007). At least since Granovetter (1973), a rich theoretical literature has rationalized this fact by modelling networks as non-market institutions that help overcome information frictions inherent in the labor market. From workers' perspective, networks grant their members preferential access to information on high-quality job openings, e.g. as in Calvo-Armengol and Jackson (2004). On the firm side, networks may help alleviate the asymmetric information problem in hiring leading potentially to a better job-match, e.g. as in Beaman and Magruder (2012). In our study, we focus on the value of social networks from the perspective of workers. Swiss asylum policy provides a unique natural experiment to study the effects of social networks on labor market outcomes. Because of the truly exogenous placement, long horizon over which the policy was in place and the large sample size, we can delve deeper into the mechanisms of how social networks affect labor market integration than previous studies have done and look at network structure beyond simply its size. Our findings will enable us to distinguish among a large set of theoretical models of the value of networks from the point of view of individual job seekers. (2) Maternity: At the same time, such immigration policies also affect the social integration of immigrants and, in our case, individual health and wellbeing. Specifically, we exploit the same unique setting to assess the relevance of information on infants' health. Random allocation of asylum seekers in Switzerland allows us to first, study the spatial differences in health care provision across the country. Further, by exploiting that French-speaking refugees are randomly placed in French- or non-French-speaking regions, we can credibly identify the language-match-health-gap, based on refugees that do not speak French as a control group and placed on either side of the language border (in a Difference in Differences framework). By extending the language to a novel (continuous) measure of language distance, we are able to factor out country of origin effects using bi-lateral regressions. A second strand of policies targets the (economic) integration of immigrants and generally of persons outside the labor market. A common approach is to provide measures, so-called Active Labor Market Programs (ALMP) that enhance a jobseeker’s employability (e.g., through additional human capital) or that keep a person close to the labor market through occupational programs. (3) Access Bias: Some measures, however, can negatively affect labor market outcomes, such as unemployment duration and post-unemployment wages, because of factors such as human capital deprivation or lock-in effects. Based on encompassing registry data that allow researchers to control for usually unobserved employability variables, we find evidence of a systematic access bias whereby caseworkers in Switzerland assign unemployed immigrants to activation measures based on what we call a competition logic that is mainly driven by and conforms to an economic rationale and the job center’s performance evaluation. From the perspective of immigrants’ labor market integration, this may be problematic because it results in an overrepresentation of immigrants in measures with little efficacy rather than in measures that could compensate for (some of) their employability disadvantages. Conversely, we find that Swiss citizens are relatively advantaged in the ability to access more measures that promote human capital enhancement (compensation logic) and that have been shown to be successful tools for labor market reintegration. It is plausible that a stronger reliance on the competition logic by caseworkers and the consequential overrepresentation of migrants in low-efficacy measures amplifies migrants’ general labor market disadvantages. (4) Priming: This rather negative stance on integration measures in the form of ALMPs is further advanced by a study where we present indications that ALMP participants are pushed into lower paying jobs compared to equally qualified non-participants. In this study on the effect of subjective beliefs on employment outcomes we find that the employment chances one year after the start of unemployment increase for both ALMP participants and non-participants when self-control and employment beliefs are high. In contrast, higher initial reservation wages increase employment chances for non-participants but substantially reduce them for ALMP participants. Previous studies have shown that beneficial effects of activation measures are often abrogated by lock-in effects, human capital deprivation, and/or negative signals to prospective employers, all of which are particularly harmful for highly skilled workers and higher-paying jobs. We argue that these detrimental effects ultimately push ALMP participants into jobs below their expected salary, where the negative consequences of activation measures are less pronounced. (5) Heterogeneity: A related aspect that is crucial from an integration perspective is whether such effects of ALMPs differ across groups, that is, whether the participation of “natives” turns out to have different consequences for their labor market performance compared to participating immigrants. In this study, we argue that effect heterogeneity between native and migrant participants can provide information about the type of discrimination that migrants face in the labor market. Using encompassing administrative data from Switzerland, we observe all registered jobseekers in 2004 and follow their monthly labor market trajectories over 10 subsequent years. Our findings are consistent with earlier evaluations of ALMPs in Switzerland and elsewhere, which find that participation effects of ALMPs are limited and sometimes even negative. However, findings show that employers value the additional productivity-related information of ALMP participation more if participants have a foreign nationality. We infer that labor market discrimination against migrants is dominated by statistical reasoning on the part of prospective employers. (6) LM-Index: Eventually, we provide a meta-analytical study where we argue that comparative assessments of integration policies fail to properly take confounding factors into account. That is, immigrant groups exposed to integration policies in different countries differ in their characteristics because immigration policies and migrants’ destination choice induce an ex-ante bias. To circumvent this limit to comparative analyses, we aspire to collect and generate data on all existing policy dimensions and subsequently provide a comparative analysis of immigrants’ labor market integration in industrialized countries."
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
71 Project

Recruitment Policies of Non-EU/EEA Nurses and Ethical Issues: A Comparison of the UK, France, and Switzerland

Year 2018
Book Title High-skilled Migration. Drivers and Policies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
75 Book Chapter

ELECLAW Indicators

Description
The ELECLAW indicators measure the degree of inclusion of the electoral franchise for three categories of potential voters or candidates: resident citizens, non-resident citizens and non-citizen residents. They cover both the right to vote (VOTLAW) and the right to stand as candidate (CANLAW) in three types of elections (presidential/executive, legislative and referendum) at four levels (supranational, national, regional and local). For each category of persons, the ELECLAW indicators measure on a 0 to 1 scale the degree of inclusion of electoral laws along two dimensions. First, eligibility restrictions determine the category of persons who have the right to vote or stand as candidate. Second, access restrictions determine how those eligible can exercise their right to vote by means of voter registration and voting methods. The indicators have been calculated on the basis of the qualitative information included in our National Electoral Laws and Electoral Rights databases and our country reports on Access to Electoral Rights. The current version includes the 28 Member States of the European Union based on electoral laws in both 2013 and 2015, as well as Switzerland, the Americas, and Oceania based on electoral laws in 2015.
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
77 Data Set

Inverting the Logic of Economic Migration: Happiness Among Migrants Moving from Wealthier to Poorer Countries in Europe

Authors D Bartram
Year 2015
Journal Name JOURNAL OF HAPPINESS STUDIES
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78 Journal Article

The impact of dramatic events on public debate concerning accommodation of Islam in Europe

Authors Nathalie Vanparys, D Jacobs, Corinne Torrekens
Year 2013
Journal Name Ethnicities
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80 Journal Article

Globalization and the transformation of the national political space: Six European countries compared

Authors HANSPETER KRIESI, EDGAR GRANDE, ROMAIN LACHAT, ...
Year 2006
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL RESEARCH
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
81 Journal Article

Migrant Integration Policy Index

Authors Thomas Huddleston
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
82 Book

Analysing the Role of Social Visits on Migrants' Social Capital: A Personal Network Approach

Authors Gil Viry, E Widmer, Jacques-Antoine Gauthier, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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85 Journal Article

Migrant Integration Policy Index 2015

Authors Thomas Huddleston, Özge Bilgili, Anne-Linde Joki, ...
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
86 Book

Northern European retired residents in nine southern European areas: characteristics, motivations and adjustment

Authors MARÍA ANGELES CASADO-DÍAZ, CLAUDIA KAISER, ANTHONY M. WARNES
Year 2004
Journal Name AGEING AND SOCIETY
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87 Journal Article

Cultural Interactions between Muslim Immigrants and Receiving Societies

Principal investigator Ruud Koopmans (Principal Investigator), Jean Tillie (Principal Investigator), Dirk Jacobs (Principal Investigator), Paul Statham (Principal Investigator), Marco Giugni (Principal Investigator), Manlio Cinalli (Principal Investigator)
Description
"The theoretical background and objectives The project EURISLAM provides an encompassing view of the integration of Muslim immigrants in six West European countries by linking information on the institutional status of Islam and religious rights for Muslims, public debates on Muslims and Islam in the mass media, and individual attitudes, behavioural patterns, and interethnic contacts of both Muslim immigrants and native populations. Using an institutional and discursive opportunity structure perspective, the project investigates to what extent cross-national differences in religiosity, socio-economic position, interethnic contacts, and identification of Muslims vary as a function of the way in which Islam has been incorporated in different countries and to what extent they are affected by differences in the salience and content of public debates on Muslims and Islam. Similarly, we ask how such contextual conditions affect the ways in which majority populations see and interact with Muslims. Research design, data and methodology The study combines several types of data: indicators of Muslim rights, content analyses for the period 1999-2008, a new survey among four groups of Muslims (Turks, Moroccans, Pakistani and ex-Yugoslav Muslims) and a comparison group of native non-Muslims, and finally focus groups with members of ""transnational families"", of which members have migrated to different countries. This part of the project is quasi-experimental in nature because it compares groups with a very similar background before migration (namely members of the same family) who have ended up in different immigration countries. Findings Our findings show that Muslims have been able to gain the most religious rights in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and the least in France and Switzerland, which are both strongly influenced by a laicist tradition of church-state relations. Germany and Belgium occupy intermediary positions. A first analysis shows that these different opportunity structures have important consequences for the nature of public debates about Muslim rights. In order to compare the debates across countries, we distinguish between claims on rights within and outside public institutions, claims asking for parity with existing regulations for Christians (and sometimes also Jews) versus those that refer to special arrangements for which there is no direct Christian equivalent, and finally those that refer to mainstream (e.g., mosques or headscarves) or minoritarian (e.g., the burqa) Muslim practices. We find evidence that accommodation of Muslim rights leads to a process of claim shift, as it encourages both Muslim groups and their opponents within the public domain to shift attention from private, parity, and mainstream issues to more “obtrusive” issues. In line with the expectations of the political opportunity perspective we find that this tendency is strongest in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, where much of the debate refers to special rights in the context of public institutions, which are often related to religious practices of small groups of orthodox Muslims. In the other countries, and especially in France and Switzerland, more basic religious rights, referring to practices such as mosques, minarets, and headscarves dominate the debate, which are not important as issues of controversy in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. These results indicate that although the incorporation of Islam is highly controversial in all countries, the terms of the debate vary starkly, and do so largely in line with national integration policy and state-church traditions. In that sense the debate about Islam is, in spite of highly visible international events around Islam in the period of study, not genuinely transnational. For the moment, the incorporation of, and controversies about Islam largely follow national paths."
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
92 Project

Dashboard of indicators for measuring policy and institutional coherence for migration and development (PICMD)

Description
The dashboard of indicators for measuring policy and institutional coherence for migration and development (PICMD) is a user-friendly tool that has been developed by the KNOMAD Thematic Working Group on Policy and Institutional Coherence. The dashboard aims to measure the extent to which public policies and institutional arrangements are coherent with international best practices to minimise the risks and maximise the development gains of migration, and can be used by domestic policy makers and other stakeholders such as researchers, civil society and international organisations. For policy makers, the dashboard should serve as a particularly useful tool during the policy formulation, evaluation and adjustment process. Indicators are organised around the following five policy dimensions: promote institutional coherence, reduce the costs of migration, protect the rights of migrants and their family, promote reintegration, enhance the development impact of migration. There are two distinct dashboards – one from the perspective of countries of origin and the other from the perspective of countries of destination – with separate indicators except in the area of institutional coherence. Any given country can be considered both a country of origin and a country of destination. The Thematic Working Group is currently operationalising the dashboard in 15 pilot countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cabo Verde, Germany, Jamaica, Kenya, Moldova, Morocco, the Philippines, Portugal, the Netherlands, Serbia, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, and Trinidad and Tobago.
Year 2016
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93 Data Set

Promoting Comparative Quantitative Research in the Field of Migration and Integration in Europe

Description
With the Amsterdam Treaty and the increasing competence of the European Union in the field of migration, integration, anti-discrimination and asylum, the need for comparative data in this area has been increasingly recognised. The project compiles meta-information on statistical datasets on migration, integration and discrimination in 29 European countries (EU27 plus Norway and Switzerland). It builds on the earlier COMPSTAT project carried out under the 5th Framework Programme between 2001-2002, the FP6 project "Towards harmonised European Statistics on International Migration" (THESIM), completed in 2005 as well as ongoing research within the IMISCOE network. Objectives • To improve the quality of publicly available information on migration, integration and discrimination responding thus to the needs of researchers, policy makers and practitioners for more reliable, more systematic and more harmonized statistical data • To enhance comparability of statistical data and understanding of indicators Outcomes • Launch of a comprehensive online database containing descriptions of datasets relevant to the study of migration. • Analyses of the national data collection system in 29 European countries. • Detailed analysis of the availability, comparability, and the usability of statistical data in 12 thematic areas: 1) general demographic data; 2) migration flows; 3) legal status of immigrants; 4) citizenship; 5) political participation; 6) employment; 7) income 8) housing; 9) irregular migration; 10) education; 11) family and 12) health as well as in two cross-cutting thematic fields - integration and discrimination
Year 2007
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96 Project

MIPEX (Migrant Integration Policy Index)

Description
The Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX) is a unique tool which measures policies to integrate migrants. The MIPEX aims to address this by providing a comprehensive tool which can be used to assess, compare and improve integration policy. The index is a useful tool to evaluate and compare what governments are doing to promote the integration of migrants in all the countries analysed. The tool allows you to dig deep into the multiple factors that influence the integration of migrants into society and allows you to use the full MIPEX results to analyse and assess past and future changes in policy. The MIPEX includes 38 countries in order to provide a view of integration policies across a broad range of differing environments. Countries included are all EU Member States, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey and the USA. 167 policy indicators have been developed to create a rich, multi-dimensional picture of migrants’ opportunities to participate in society. MIPEX addresses 8 policy areas of integration: Labour Market Mobility, Family Reunion, Education, Political Participation, Long-term Residence, Access to Nationality, Anti-discrimination and Health. Thanks to the relevance and rigor of its indicators, the MIPEX has been recognised as a common quick reference guide across Europe. Policymakers, NGOs, researchers, and European and international institutions are using its data not only to understand and compare national integration policies, but also to improve standards for equal treatment.
Year 2014
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
97 Data Set

Modes of Immigration Politics in Liberal Democratic States

Authors Gary P. Freeman
Year 1995
Journal Name International Migration Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
100 Journal Article
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