Upbringing of children and migration

Migrants who bring their children to, or have children born in, the settling society may have different experiences in the upbringing of their children than non-migrating parents. There are also scenarios in which non-migrating children are being cared for by guardians while one or both parents have emigrated. This topic also covers the raising of children who have been adopted from abroad. In the broadest terms, this topic refers to how migration can influence the upbringing of children. 

Studies listed under this category include literature on raising children to be bilingual, bicultural socialization, transnational child rearing, and the relationship between parental styles and behavioural problems.

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Et iakttatt foreldreskap Om å være foreldre og minoritet i Norge

Authors Ingrid Smette, Monika Grønli Rosten
Description
Denne rapporten handler om erfaringer som foreldre fra ulike etniske og religiøse minoriteter har med å oppdra barn i Norge. Studien er gjennomført på oppdrag fra Barne-, ungdoms, og familiedirektoratet (Bufdir) som ønsker mer kunnskap om mangfoldet av foreldrepraksiser og -erfaringer i Norge for å utvikle likeverdige tjenester. Vi har brukt begrepene etniske og religiøse minoriteter som avgrensning fra andre minoritetskategorier, basert for eksempel på seksualitet eller funksjonsnedsettelse. Minoritetsbegrepet i vår studie viser til personer som definerer seg selv, eller opplever at de blir definert av andre, som minoritet i kraft av etnisk og/eller religiøs bakgrunn. I rapporten har vi undersøkt følgende problemstillinger:  Hvilke idealer har foreldrene for sitt foreldreskap, og hvordan sammenligner de sin måte å være mor og far på med hvordan de selv ble oppdratt?  Hvilke erfaringer har foreldrene med å stå for og videreføre verdier i potensiell konflikt med verdier i majoritetssamfunnet?  Hvilken betydning har ulike minoritetsfellesskap, nabolag og lokalmiljø for foreldreskapet?  Hvilke erfaringer har foreldrene med barnevern og andre hjelpetjenester i forbindelse med bekymringer for barn?  Hvilke begrensinger og muligheter opplever foreldrene at barna deres får som medlem både av en minoritetsgruppe og av majoritetssamfunnet? En stor del av forskningen på minoriteter i Norge har fokusert på enkeltgrupper og har analysert endringer mellom generasjoner innad i gruppen. I denne rapporten har vi derimot valgt å studere foreldreskap og betydningen av minoritetsposisjon på tvers av etnisitet og religion. Studien bygger på intervjuer med 32 foreldre med ulike forutsetninger og posisjoner i det norske samfunnet. Utvalget inkluderer flyktninger som har kommet til Norge enten som barn eller voksne, andregenerasjons innvandrere, nyankomne arbeidsinnvandrere og majoritetsnorske medlemmer av kristne trossamfunn utenfor den norske kirke. Gjennom dette grepet har vi utforsket likheter og forskjeller i foreldrenes erfaringer med å oppdra barn i en minoritetskontekst.
Year 2019
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1 Report

Migrasjon, foreldreskap og sosial kontroll

Authors Jon Horgen Friberg, Mathilde Bjørnset
Description
The topic of this report is parenting and social control, with a particular focus on immigrant families from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka. The empirical analyses fall into three parts: A quantitative analysis of attitudes to gender roles, sexuality and relationships in immigrant families and the scope of parental restrictions, as well as analyses of the driving forces and development of social control. We ask questions about the attitudes that are found in various groups with regard to issues of gender roles and sexuality among adolescents. Furthermore, we identify those who are most at risk of being subject to strict parental restrictions, and what kinds of consequences these may entail for the life of young people. A qualitative analysis of the parents’ subjective concerns with regard to raising children and adolescents in Norway, based on individual and group interviews with parents. Here, we will focus on the parents’ perspectives and their experiences of and grounds for the way in which they exercise social control. A qualitative analysis of complexity and social change in family relationships in a migration context, based on interviews with parents, adolescents and young adults, as well as professionals in the assistance services. Here, we focus on the experiences of the young people and relationships within families, with a special emphasis on mechanisms of social change. Quantitative analyses of attitudes and social control Based on the adolescents’ assessments of their parents’ attitudes, we find that the parental generation from countries such as Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka, as well as other immigrant groups from the global South, are far more conservative in issues concerning pre-marital sex, homosexuality and letting adolescents in upper secondary school age have boy-/girlfriends, when compared to the population in general. Attitudes to gender roles and sexuality are closely linked to religion—both the degree of religiosity and affiliation with specific religious communities have an effect. Muslim immigrants appear to be the most conservative, but other religious groups are also far more conservative in such issues than the general population. We also find major variations in attitudes between different groups among adolescents, but the young people tend to see themselves as considerably more liberal than their parents. A substantial minority within some immigrant groups reports what may be referred to as severe parental restrictions on their social life. For example, 29 per cent of all girls from a Pakistani background in the first year of upper secondary school in Oslo and Akershus report that it is very or fairly true that their parents object to them ‘being in the company of persons of the opposite gender in their leisure time with no adults present’. The degree of parental control is directly linked to the parents’ cultural orientation and degree of religious conviction. The more concerned the parents are to preserve the culture of their country of origin, the stronger the likelihood that the adolescents will be exposed to strict parental control. There is also a certain correlation with the parents’ socioeconomic status, but this effect is far weaker. Adolescents who receive good grades in school, however, tend to report fewer parental restrictions than peers with poorer school performance. Boys and girls tend to experience somewhat different forms of social control. While boys in fact more often report restrictions on being with friends, girls more frequently report that their parents object to them being with someone of the opposite gender without adult supervision. Among Muslims, girls report more parental restrictions than boys, whereas the opposite is the case in some other groups. We may assume that some boys have greater expectations regarding their own freedom and thus have a lower threshold for reporting parental restrictions. In addition, the qualitative interviews indicate that even though boys and girls may be subject to equally strict rules, violations made by girls are seen as far more serious. Adolescents who are born in Norway to immigrant parents are less exposed to parental restrictions than those who have immigrated themselves, and the degree of parental restrictions diminishes markedly in pace with increased length of residence in the family. This reduction in parental restrictions appears to also occur in families that retain a conservative attitude to adolescent gender roles and sexuality. The analyses indicate that parental restrictions have considerable consequences for the lives of young people. Reports of parental restrictions are associated with lower rates of participation in organised leisure activities and a higher likelihood of reporting mental afflictions and low self-esteem. Some young people appear to lead what may be termed ‘double lives’ in conflict with their parents’ wishes. For example, a considerable proportion of minority youths have a boy-/girlfriend, even though they believe that their parents would strongly disapprove of this. Parental perspectives on raising adolescents in a foreign culture In the second section of the empirical analyses we have attempted to give a voice to the generation of parents among immigrants from Pakistan, Somalia and Sri Lanka and their concerns linked to being a parent in Norway. We place special emphasis on older and relatively conservative parents, since they clearly articulate topics that to a greater or lesser extent are of concern for others as well. Many of the parents whom we interviewed report missing a larger social collective from which to seek support in raising children, and often feeling alone with the responsibility for the children. In their countries of origin, raising children tends to be more of a communal responsibility that involves the extended family, relatives and the local community, and where key norms are shared in all the different arenas that the children frequent. The loss of this community, the feeling of dissolution of family bonds and of being alone when facing a strange and foreign world were among the recurring topics in interviews with the parents. Some also express frustration over the fact that the children, in their opinion, fail to uphold the community norms that prevailed in their own youth. Individualism—often interpreted as egotism—and liberal attitudes to substance use and sexuality are perceived as especially threatening aspects of Norwegian society. In addition, some parents see that their traditional instruments for maintaining discipline and control, including corporal punishment, shared religious norms and support from the extended family, are unavailable here. Some therefore feel that they are unable to adequately exercise parental and social control. Some are also uncertain of what is considered acceptable in terms of setting boundaries for children in Norwegian society. Some parents feel that their religion, identity and culture are under pressure from the wider society. To some extent, this is a reflection of uncertainty and fear in the encounter with the unknown. However, this perception also reflects a real conflict between different ways of regulating social life: Should adolescents be regarded as citizens with independent rights and autonomy, or are their rights and duties primarily derived from their membership in a family collective with sovereign authority over its members? This conflict between a collectivist and religious family organisation on the one hand and secular-state individualism on the other is partly expressed in the form of an ambivalent relationship toward schools. Immigrant parents tend to have strongly positive attitudes to school and education, but in matters related to swimming lessons for boys and girls, summer camps, showering after PE classes etc. some parents feel that their wishes are being ignored. The state/family conflict emerges with particular clarity in the form of families’ fear of the child protection service, which some parents see as a constant threat and an invasion of the family’s sovereignty. The maintenance of traditional marriage institutions is perceived by many as the key to perpetuating family structure, faith and identity, and concern for the children’s future marriage is a main factor in the execution of social control. In the background lurks the fear of being sent to a nursing home, which for some is a symbol of the consequences should they fail to preserve traditional family structures. For some parents, there is thus a lot at stake in their parenting practices. There are major individual variations between different families and parents in all three groups with regard to the strength of these concerns. However, there are also systematic differences between the groups that are worth noting. The first difference concerns the ‘glue’ in the social networks that binds them together. Although the Pakistani, Somali and Tamil informants were all concerned with family dissolution as a result of migration, there were considerable differences with regard to their concrete social organisation. The Somali group stood out at one end of the scale, by having largely fragmented social networks and many families with dissolved family structures. As many as 6 out of 10 adolescents with a Somali background reported that they did not live with both parents together. The Tamil group with a background from Sri Lanka stood out at the other end, by having largely succeeded in reconstructing closely knit social networks that provide considerable support for individual families, organised within the framework of the Tamil diaspora movement. The second difference pertains to the perception of identity conflict. Some of the parents in both the Somali and Pakistani groups felt that, to some extent, their wish to perpetuate their cultural and religious identity conflicted with the intentions of the Norwegian state regarding their children. The Tamils were also concerned with preserving their own identity, but for them, this was a matter of language, rather than religion, and they far less frequently stated that this was antagonistic to their integration in the wider society. Inter-generational relations and social change The interviews with adolescents and young adults underscore the social complexity in relationships characterised by strong social control. Adolescents and parents are both part of networks and relationships in which many of the participants experience mutually incompatible demands and expectations—not only to their own lifestyle, but also in terms of how they should relate to that of others. It is thus not always so easy to identify those who exercise social control and those who are being controlled, since there are many—including parents, siblings and other relatives—who may feel that they are caught ‘between a rock and a hard place’, squeezed between the expectations of others. The way in which adolescents perceive being subject to strong social control will largely depend on their own attitudes and adaptations. For example, internalising the family’s expectations is one way to ensure avoidance of conflicts while being able to perceive autonomy and independence in daily life. Others choose to embrace a religious identity as a way to distance themselves from the family’s demands, while committing to a set of life rules that ensure acceptance and legitimacy. Some enter into conflict, in the form of breaking out and settling scores or fighting small everyday battles. Many live so-called ‘double lives’, shifting between varying expectations and demands in different arenas. However, one effect of such ‘double lives’ is that relationships become potentially vulnerable—the consequences are felt only when something ‘goes wrong’. Inter-generational conflicts in relationships characterised by strong social control cannot be understood only as value conflicts; they also take the form of negotiations, where various resources can be brought into the bargain. For many young people, however, conflicts of interest between different generations appear as internalised value conflicts, such as the parents’ concern regarding who will take care of them in their old age. We identify a number of social mechanisms that, over time, will bring about change in the direction of more liberal parenting practices. These are partly changes that follow from learning and adaptation, and partly changes that follow from conflicts. Over time, many families feel that their points of reference gradually change and the idealised images of the perfect family have a tendency to pale. In some communities, their notion of ‘scandal’ erodes, and the fear of what others might say loses some of its hold as time passes. Furthermore, many parents discover through trial and error that traditional authoritarian parenting styles function poorly in Norway. Many report that they have been ‘forced’ to change their methods in seeking to transfer their values to the children. In addition, we can see that the institutional frameworks in Norwegian society—which provide women and children with far better legal protection and access to resources—help give small and large internal family conflicts a different outcome than what would have been seen in the countries of origin. Increasing levels of education, especially among girls in the second generation, also help change the balance of power and the bargaining situation in ways that gradually change the rules of the game in the families. Religion plays an ambiguous role in these processes of change. Religion is the source of demands and restrictions related to gender segregation and chastity, and religious arguments lend weight and legitimacy to the execution of social control, with a conservative effect. At the same time, we can see that changes in family practices are accompanied by a more liberal and individualist interpretation of religion in the younger generation. For some, religiously based arguments may even provide a weighty case for liberation from the more culturally based expectations from the parents’ generation. The report is concluded with some reflections around the implications for policy-oriented work in this area.
Year 2019
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2 Report

Norwegian schooling in the eyes of Polish parents: From contestations to embracing the system

Authors Magdalena Ślusarczyk, Paula Pustułka
Year 2016
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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3 Journal Article

Child-centred narratives of Polish mothers: cross-generational identity constructions abroad

Year 2014
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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4 Journal Article

Parental health-related quality of life, depression and stress among low-income immigrants

Authors Akiko Kamimura, Guadalupe Aguilera, Jeanie Ashby, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
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5 Journal Article

Erziehungsstile und Erziehungskompetenzen in Familien mit Zuwanderungsgeschichte

Principal investigator Hacı Halil Uslucan (Principal Investigator)
Description
In dem Projekt geht es darum, zunächst eine empirische Studie zu Erziehungsstilen und Erziehungskompetenzen in Familien mit Zuwanderungsgeschichte durchzuführen, die türkeistämmige, arabische, polnische und als Kontrollgruppe deutsche Familien umfasst. Dann sollen die Ergebnisse einer breiten Öffentlichkeit im Rahmen einer Tagung vorgestellt werden. Sie sollen der Identifikation gezielter erzieherischer Interventions- und Fördermaßnahmen dienen. Darüber hinaus soll auch spezifisch für Eltern der beteiligten Sprachgruppen ein Erziehungsmanual in ihrer Muttersprache erstellt werden, das wesentliche Erkenntnisse der Forschung in einer verständlichen Sprache zusammenfasst sowie Eltern pädagogisch-psychologisch begründete Anleitung gibt, den Zusammenhang von elterlicher Erziehung und kindlicher Entwicklung erklärt und damit die Steigerung elterlicher Erziehungskompetenzen bewirkt.
Year 2013
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6 Project

Discipline Methods Used by Mothers: The Contribution of Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status, and Child's Characteristics

Authors Mona Khoury-Kassabri, MA Straus
Year 2011
Journal Name CHILD INDICATORS RESEARCH
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7 Journal Article

Advies: Veranderd ouderschap en migratie

Authors The Dutch Advisory Committee on Migration Affairs (ACVZ)
Description
Een kind met drie of vier juridische ouders. En wat als een van die ouders niet de Nederlandse nationaliteit heeft? Als Nederland besluit om regelingen te treffen voor meerouderschap en meerpersoongezag dan is het volgens de Adviescommissie voor Vreemdelingenzaken (ACVZ) niet nodig om op voorhand bepaalde groepen vreemdelingen die een beroep willen doen op deze regelingen uit te sluiten.
Year 2018
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9 Report

Parenting, citizenship and belonging in Dutch adoption debates 1900-1995

Authors Marlou Schrover
Year 2020
Journal Name Identities
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10 Journal Article

Transnational educational strategies of Polish migrant mothers parenting in Great Britain

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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12 Journal Article

‘I don’t want to have a separated home’: Reckoning family and return migration among married Nigerians in China

Authors Kudus Oluwatoyin Adebayo
Year 2019
Journal Name Migration Studies
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13 Journal Article

Gender and International Migration: Contributions and Cross-Fertilizations

Authors Gioconda Herrera
Year 2013
Journal Name ANNUAL REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY, VOL 40
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14 Journal Article

Private empowerment and public isolation: power in the stories of migrant 'Mother-Poles'

Authors Paula Pustulka, Agnieszka Trąbka
Year 2018
Journal Name Identities
Citations (WoS) 2
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16 Journal Article

‘Everywhere is home’: The paradox of ‘homing’ and child upbringing among Nigerian-Chinese families in Guangzhou city

Authors Kudus Oluwatoyin Adebayo, Femi O Omololu
Year 2020
Journal Name International Sociology
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17 Journal Article

Localizing masculinities in the global care chains: experiences of migrant men in Spain and Ecuador

Authors Cristen Dávalos
Year 2020
Journal Name GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE
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19 Journal Article

Transnational divorces in Singapore: experiences of low-income divorced marriage migrant women

Authors Sharon Ee Ling Quah
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 2
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20 Journal Article

Matka migrantka. Perspektywa transnarodowości w badaniu przemian ról rodzicielskich

Year 2009
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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21 Journal Article

Omsorgsovertakelser og etniske minoriteter En gjennomgang av saker i fylkesnemnda

Authors Monica Five Aarset, Anja Bredal
Description
Rapporten bygger på et forskningsoppdrag fra Barne-, ungdoms- og familiedirektoratet (Bufdir) om barneverntjenestens og fylkesnemndas håndtering av saker om omsorgsovertakelse i familier med etnisk minoritetsbakgrunn. Datamaterialet har bestått av vedtak og saksmapper fra fylkesnemnda. Studien er ikke en fullstendig kartlegging av barneverntjenestens arbeid, men løfter frem noen mønstre og temaer som kan være utfordrende eller problematiske i barnevernets arbeid med etniske minoritetsfamilier. Blant annet pekes det på at barneverntjenestens økte fokus på vold mot barn, tilsier en styrket faglig diskusjon om voldsforståelser og en revurdering av barnevernets erkjennelsesparadigme.
Year 2018
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22 Report

Land of Diverse Migrations: Challenges of Emigration and Immigrations in Turkey

Authors Ahmet İçduygu, Kemal Kirişci
Year 2009
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23 Book

Where, What and Whom to Study? Principles, Guidelines and Empirical Examples of Case Selection and Sampling in Migration Research

Authors Karolina Barglowski
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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25 Book Chapter

“It Is Better to Do Business in Africa than in Europe” – Socio-Economic Positionings among Business-Minded European Somalis Moving to Kenya

Authors Tabea Scharrer
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies
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26 Journal Article

Appartenenza culturale e disabilità. Per una lettura multidimensionale della doppia diversità in ambito educativo e sociale - Cultural belonging and disability. For a multidimensional reading of double diversity in educational and social contexts

Authors Emanuela Bini
Year 2020
Journal Name Educazione Interculturale. Teorie, Ricerche e Pratiche (vol. 18, n. 2) - Università degli Studi di Bologna
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28 Journal Article

Review of a book - Recensione del libro di Paola Bonifacci (a cura di), “I bambini bilingui. Favorire gli apprendimenti nelle classi multiculturali”, Roma, Carocci, 2018

Authors Emanuela Bini
Year 2020
Journal Name Italiano a scuola (vol. 2, n. 2) - Università degli Studi di Bologna
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29 Journal Article

What’s Driving Migrant Russian Physicians to Stay Permanently in Finland? A Life-Course Approach

Authors Driss Habti
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Finnish Studies
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30 Journal Article

Living with difference: Refugee education and school segregation processes in Greece

Authors Pinelopy Vergou, University of Thessaly
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
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31 Journal Article

Who cares for the children and the elderly?

Year 2018
Book Title Childhood and Parenting in Transnational Settings. International Perspectives on Migration
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33 Book Chapter

Child’s Gender, Young Fathers’ Crime, and Spillover Effects in Criminal Behavior [Denmark]

Authors Christian Dustmann, Rasmus Landersø
Year 2018
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34 Working Paper

Goals and Gaps: Educational Careers of Immigrant Children [Italy]

Authors Michela Carlana, Eliana La Ferrara, Paolo Pinotti
Year 2018
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35 Working Paper

Who benefits from universal child care? Estimating marginal returns to early child care attendance [Germany]

Authors Thomas Cornelissen, Christian Dustmann, Anna Raute, ...
Year 2018
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36 Working Paper

Growing up in Ethnic Enclaves: Language Proficiency and Educational Attainment of Immigrant Children [Germany]

Authors Alexander M. Danzer, Carsten Feuerbaum, Marc Piopiunik, ...
Year 2018
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37 Working Paper

Country of Origin Effects and Impacts on Educational Attainment of Pupils with Migrant Backgrounds. Towards a New Research Agenda

Year 2017
Book Title Migrant Integration Between Homeland and Host Society Volume 1
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38 Book Chapter

Growing Up Multicultural: The Experiences of Children Raised by Polish-Norwegian Mixed Couples in Norway

Year 2017
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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39 Journal Article

Unruly Boys and Obedient Girls: Gender and Education in UNRWA Schools in the West Bank

Authors Nina Gren
Year 2017
Journal Name Nidaba
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41 Journal Article

Migrant workers: China boom leaves children behind

Authors Peng Yuan, Long Wang
Year 2016
Journal Name Nature
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42 Journal Article

Slipping through the Cracks of a Welfare State: Children of Immigrants in Finland

Authors Laura Ansala, Ulla Hämäläinen, Matti Sarvimäki
Year 2016
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43 Working Paper

Meeting the challenge: Voluntary sector services for destitute migrant children and families

Description
This report examines the services provided by voluntary sector organisations in England to migrant children and families who are destitute. The report seeks to identify the strategic challenges facing the sector in developing and delivering destitution services to this group of people, and explores potential solutions to them.
Year 2016
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44 Report

Kapitał rodziny i rodzinności w przestrzeni transnarodowej. Na przykładzie badań polskich rodzin w Norwegii

Year 2016
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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45 Journal Article

Migrant Parental Engagement in Schools: Lessons Learned Report

Description
The education strand of the Action for Inclusion Initiative brought together COMPAS researchers with senior officials responsible for education in six different European cities to consider their responses around parental engagement in schools, particularly for groups at risk of exclusion. This is an important topic, since recent decades have seen unprecedented levels of migration and more population diversity within European cities, provoking new opportunities and challenges for educational institutions in receiving migrant pupils. However, while some immigrant children or children with parents of an immigrant background equal or exceed the performance of those born in the country, others (particularly those from less developed non-European countries) perform worse than those born in the receiving European country (Heath, Rothon and Kilpi 2008) and are overrepresented in figures on early school leaving (see Borgna and Contini 2014). Those lower attaining young people who leave school early are likely to experience poorer longer term integration outcomes and fewer opportunities for post-compulsory education or employment (see Eurostat 2016, evidence on education). Overcoming these difficulties is particularly pressing in urban areas and particularly for large European cities, where some immigrant-origin children form the majority of students (e.g. see Crul and Doomernik 2003). Within the wider educational research literature, it is recognised that home-school cooperation has an important role to play in improving attainment, with families recognized as having great influence on student attendance and engagement (Epstein and Sheldon 2002). As such, engaging migrant parents is a policy priority. Within the Action for Inclusion group, we provided research evidence on the topic and asked officials in city or municipal level policy and practice to share their own experiences of encouraging parental involvement in young people’s education. They were asked to identify barriers that inhibited positive home-community-school collaboration and plan some form of tangible reform in their cities. The focus of reform was envisaged as flexible; it could involve developing new programmes or mean adapting existing strategies or content of programmes, or it might involve planning strategic approaches within municipalities to win support and develop resourcing for these initiatives. Throughout meetings, we shared peer feedback on the plans, offering constructive criticism and shared resources among participants. As a result of the collaborative process, we are sharing the examples of the city plans to improve parental involvement with other European cities in order to seek better results for pupils at risk of educational exclusion. These plans, in their entirety can be seen here. The aim of this particular report is to summarise the collective experience of working with senior staff across the six cities involved in the education group as they developed their reforms in the area of migrant parental engagement. It aims to reflect on the experience of the process and summarise some issues that arose from the research scoping and practice in shaping city-level interventions. The report aims to consider the extent to which, within this process, the cities were successful and explain some of the future plans emerging from the initiative.
Year 2016
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46 Report

Introduction. Family Migration as an Integration Issue? Policy Perspectives and Academic Insights .

Authors Saskia Bonjour, Albert Kraler
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Family Issues
Citations (WoS) 21
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48 Journal Article

Dzieci w migracjach. Doświadczenia z badań w Polsce

Year 2015
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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49 Journal Article

Spatialities of Work and Home in a Dual-Career Context of Highly Skilled Arab Women in Finland

Authors Driss Habti
Year 2014
Journal Name Journal of Finnish Studies
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51 Journal Article

Między domem a szkołą: dzieci migrantów w systemie edukacyjnym. Kontekst norweski

Year 2014
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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54 Journal Article

Normalitet i limbo Asylbarn med endelig avslag

Authors Nerina Weiss
Description
Barn med avslag på sin asylsøknad er en svært sårbar gruppe. Ved årsskiftet 2012–2013 bodde det 1264 barn med endelig avslag i norske mottak. Omtrent halvparten av disse har bodd i asylmottak i mer enn tre år. Denne rapporten ser på situasjonen til lengeværende asylbarn. Hvordan skal de kunne leve et tilnærmet normalt liv når de befinner seg i denne høyst spesielle situasjonen? Hvordan tilpasser barna og deres foreldre seg omgivelsene, og hvordan mestrer de sitt liv?
Year 2013
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55 Report

Asylum, age disputes and the process of age assessment

Authors Heaven Crawley, Emma Kelly
Year 2011
Book Title Safeguarding Children from Abroad Refugee, Asylum Seeking and Trafficked Children in the UK
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58 Book Chapter

Moving beyond ethnicity: the socio-economic status and living conditions of immigrant children in the UK

Authors Heaven Crawley
Year 2010
Journal Name Child Indicators Research
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64 Journal Article

Between a rock and a hard place: negotiating age and identity in the UK asylum system

Authors Heaven Crawley
Year 2009
Book Title Children, politics and communication Participation at the margins
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65 Book Chapter

Polskie dzieci z Barcelony

Authors Danuta Skaza, Tomasz Zboralski
Year 2009
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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68 Journal Article

Dziecko w sytuacji rozłąki migracyjnej

Year 2009
Book Title Contemporary migrations: dilemmas of Europe and Poland
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69 Book Chapter

Problem kształcenia dzieci najnowszej polskiej emigracji w państwach Unii Europejskiej na przykładzie Wielkiej Brytanii

Year 2009
Book Title Nationality issues in the light of integration processes in Europe
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70 Book Chapter

Små barns hverdager i asylmottak

Authors Marie Louise Seeberg
Description
Små barns hverdager i asylmottak ligger langt unna hverdagen for andre barn i samme aldersgruppe i Norge. Foreldrene er fattige, tilværelsen preget av midlertidighet, usikkerhet og mangel på struktur, og boforholdene er dårlige. Barn som bor i asylmottak befinner seg i skjæringspunktet mellom innvandringspolitikk og barne- og velferdspolitikk. Innvandringspolitiske hensyn brukes for å begrunne den svært lave levestandarden, som er vanskelig å forsvare i et barnepolitisk perspektiv. De fire artiklene som er samlet i denne rapporten, er tidligere publisert i ulike tidsskrifter, og belyser situasjonen til små barn som bor i asylmottak fra flere vinkler. Rapporten er i hovedsak basert på feltarbeid utført i 2006 blant barn 0-6 år i to asylmottak: ett transittmottak og ett ordinært mottak. Prosjektet «Små barns hverdager i asylmottak» inngår i NOVAs strategiske instituttprogram Barneforskning.
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
71 Report

Wychowawcze i edukacyjne konsekwencje "euromigracji" rodziców i opiekunów

Year 2008
Journal Name Problemy opiekuńczo-wychowawcze
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
72 Journal Article
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