Attitudes, migration and migrants

In this topic, attitudes refer to the perceptions of and feelings about migrants and migration in the sending society and/or the host society.

This topic includes include literature on public opinion towards migrants and migration, out-group attitudes and perceived group threat, the influence of nationalism and populism on such attitudes, prejudice, ethnic hierarchy and attitudes of migrants towards the host society.

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The politicization and securitization of migration in Western Europe: public opinion, political parties and the immigration issue

Authors Pietro Castelli Gattinara, Laura Morales
Year 2017
Book Title Handbook on Migration and Security
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1 Book Chapter

Public opinion on migration

Authors James DENNISON
Year 2018
Journal Name Data bulletin : informing a global compact for migration, 2018, No. 16, pp. 1-4
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2 Journal Article

The Evolution of Public Attitudes toward Immigration in Europe and the United States, 2000-2010

Authors Joel S. FETZER
Description
This paper documents and analyzes trends in immigration-related public opinion over the past decade in the major North Atlantic countries of the EU-15 and US. Opening with a summary of the international social-scientific literature on the roots of immigration attitudes, the essay next documents changes in the average European’s and American’s views on migration since 2000 using such polls as the Eurobarometer, European Social Survey, World Values Survey, International Social Science Programme, and American National Election Study. A third major section employs over-time statistical models to examine the (minimal) impact of the current economic crisis on such attitudes. Finally, the paper describes the scholarly literature on the relationship between public opinion and immigration policy in Europe and the United States and speculates on how likely the current global recession is to alter immigration laws and their enforcement.
Year 2011
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3 Report

Public Attitudes Toward Immigration

Authors Jens Hainmueller, Daniel J. Hopkins
Year 2014
Journal Name ANNUAL REVIEW OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, VOL 17
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5 Journal Article

Public attitudes on migration : rethinking how people perceive migration : an analysis of existing opinion polls in the Euro-Mediterranean region

Authors James DENNISON, Lenka DRAŽANOVÁ
Description
The International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD) commissioned the Migration Policy Centre (MPC) of the European University Institute to provide this report in early 2018, based on the work of the MPC’s Observatory of Public Attitudes to Migration (OPAM). This built on the insight and recommendations of the first EuroMed Migration Communications Study—‘How does the media on both sides of the Mediterranean report on migration?' This second study aims to: • Offer a better understanding of public attitudes to migration in 17 selected countries on both sides of the Mediterranean; • Attempt to explain why attitudes to migration are what they are — with an emphasis on the role of media. The report both summarises previous findings and provides new analyses; • Provide recommendations on how to communicate on migration in a non-polarising manner. Public attitudes; Migration; Europe; Media
Year 2018
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6 Report

Impact of public attitudes to migration on the political environment in the Euro-Mediterranean Region – First Chapter

Authors James DENNISON
Description
In this chapter we consider how and why the dramatic changes in the salience of immigration in recent years have changed European politics. We first combine findings from the literature to produce an original theoretical framework of how salience affects electoral outcomes and ultimately public policy via emotional activation and exposure to information. We then overview variation in the salience of immigration in Europe from 2005 to 2018, showing clear trends according to geography, politics and economics. Next, we produce a further comprehensive theoretical framework to explain these trends in salience, based on the literature, that specifies the respective and interactive roles of public policy, ‘real-world’ migration events and trends, media and politicians, before adducing evidence that supports this framework. We consider how salience—both in terms of the perceived most important issues affecting one’s country and the EU—has affected past European Parliamentary elections, in terms of the percentage of seats won by radical right parties, and what this tells us about future electoral results. Finally, having developed two theoretical frameworks, we offer next steps for policy-makers and researchers of migration, public opinion and European politics.
Year 2019
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7 Report

Political Trust and Support for Immigration in the American Mass Public

Authors David Macdonald
Year 2020
Journal Name British Journal of Political Science
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8 Journal Article

Postoje k imigrantům.

Authors Yana Leontiyeva, Martin Vávra
Year 2009
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10 Book

Who is reshaping public opinion on the EU’s migration policies?

Authors Thomas Huddleston, Hind Sharif, Migration Policy Group (MPG)
Year 2019
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11 Policy Brief

Ethnic Penalties, Assimilation, and the Role of Public Attitudes

Principal investigator Daniel Auer (Principal Investigator ), Giuliano Bonoli (Principal Investigator ), Flavia Fossati (Principal Investigator ), Julie Lacroix (Principal Investigator ), Fabienne Liechti (Principal Investigator ), Didier Ruedin (Principal Investigator )
Description
"This project circles around three core questions: Does assimilation work? Does discrimination vary with exposure to competition? Do public attitudes directly translate into immigrant disadvantage? (1) Assimilation Proofs: Initially, we analyze whether the origin of immigrants and/or their level of assimilation to the host country (birth and naturalization) can explain labor market trajectories. Among the manifold domains in which individuals with a migration background may face disadvantages, we focus on labor market re-integration because it has been proven to be a key factor in fostering long-term social integration into the host country. Although empirical evidence for discriminatory practices by employers is generally difficult to provide with registry data, our design minimizes potential alternative explanations. Our study benefits from a unique dataset combining registry and survey data, which were collected in the Swiss Canton of Vaud among all newly unemployed individuals between February and April 2012. The findings are based on real labor market behavior and show that when controlling for encompassing information on human and social capital and other employability criteria, individuals whose provenience is from outside the European Union face periods of unemployment that are up to 50% (or 3 months) longer than those of Swiss natives. Surprisingly, observable assimilation proofs in the form of naturalization or birth in the host country do not improve labor market re-integration. We explain this finding by employers’ discriminatory hiring behavior. (2) Assimilation Signals: In a related study, we test whether HR managers’ discrimination against candidates with a nonnative background can be counteracted by these candidates signaling assimilation into the host society. In our study, HR managers evaluate descriptions of fictitious CVs in which we vary the nationality of the candidates and different signals of cultural attachment to their migration background or to the host country. The findings reveal that candidates with Polish- and Turkish-sounding names are evaluated worse than candidates with Swiss- or Spanish-sounding names. More interestingly, however, participating in civic engagement within a traditional Swiss volunteering organization increases the opportunities given to individuals with Polish and Turkish backgrounds, while participating in an organization connected to their origin dramatically damages their evaluation by prospective employers. We also show that candidates with Polish or Turkish backgrounds who adjust their CVs to appear native by indicating fluency in only the local language (either German or French) fare much better than those who reveal a language attachment to their country of origin. We conclude that there are limited opportunities to ameliorate the evaluation of a CV by signaling assimilation into the host country; conversely, non-adapted CVs and CVs that convey multiple signals of attachment to one’s culture of origin are heavily sanctioned in the assessment by HR managers. (3) Competition: Subsequently, we want to examine whether the prevalence of ethnic discrimination varies with a discriminator’s exposure to competition. First, we use a representative online survey experiment in Germany in order to ask participants to take over the role as a football manager and to rate players in three different tasks. First results show that participants on average prefer White (rather than Black) and Western (rather than non-Western) players, especially when they need to choose between two candidates. We conclude that discrimination likely occurs when there is pressure to select. (4) Housing: In a related study, we examine ethnic discrimination in the housing market. The progressive increase of housing prices and the depletion of affordable dwellings in Swiss urban centers have brought attention to the population's housing conditions and residential mobility. Recent studies have shown that some precarious groups have a more difficult access to adequate housing, especially lower-income households and foreign-born populations. In Switzerland, where the majority of individuals live in rental units, landlords and rental agencies act as gatekeepers and play an important role in the spatial distribution of precarious populations across neighborhoods and to what type of dwelling they have access to. As a result of the landlords’ decisions, ethnic minorities might have limited choices as for where they live. They might be stuck in more deprived housings or neighborhoods, access relatively overpriced dwellings, experience higher rates of crowding, etc. Consequently, our study proposes to investigate mechanisms of discrimination that might take place in the Swiss housing market amongst landlords, professional agencies, and private persons (renters), each of whom potentially having different incentives to discriminate. (5&6) Attitudes: Do public attitudes directly translate into immigrant disadvantage? We aspire to answer this question with two original studies on the effect of public referenda in Switzerland. Such regularly occurring votes are also directly referring to the country’s position vis-à-vis the international community and immigration and usually are heatedly debated prior to the referendum. We exploit such immigration-related referenda by linking salient public discourses to economic and political outcomes of foreigners living in Switzerland. Concretely, we investigate whether such debates, everything else equal, affect the propensity to find a new job during the months of the most heated public exchanges. We hypothesize that a group being pushed into the spotlight by a referendum experiences detrimental effects on its aggregated re-integration chances. Similarly, we expect local politicians with a foreign-sounding name to have a harder stand if the local election falls in the period prior to such a public controversy. (7) Perception: Eventually, we seek to shed light on the mechanisms of perceived discrimination: Who, among recent immigrants, is more likely to feel discriminated against and report it when asked in a survey? Social scientists typically define discrimination as an observable and unjust difference in the treatment of distinct groups. In order to personally feel discriminated against, people must be aware of the differential treatment and perceive it as unjust. We show that reporting discrimination when asked in a survey depends substantially upon individual traits, including aspects that shape whether discrimination is accepted and whether immigrants feel attached to the host society. Although respondents report less discrimination if their job situation has improved after migration, people more likely report discrimination when they originate from countries in which the national legislature represents ethnic minority groups relatively well. Earlier difficulties related to the migration process and the lack of supporting networks continue to affect the perception of unfair treatment. Moreover, we show that individuals distinguish to a surprising degree between discrimination in and outside the work environment. For instance, when they are proficient in the local language, respondents often report discrimination in the workplace but not in a public environment. This distinction between discrimination in the workplace and discrimination in public also depends strongly upon the immigrant’s origin. We conclude that contemporary individual-level measures and policy recommendations merely approximate discriminatory patterns; we urge future research to consider factors that affect individual perception of discrimination."
Year 2018
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12 Project

PARTY IDENTIFICATION, CONTACT, CONTEXTS, AND PUBLIC ATTITUDES TOWARD ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION

Authors Timothy B. Gravelle
Year 2016
Journal Name PUBLIC OPINION QUARTERLY
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14 Journal Article

The Consequences of Multiracial Contexts on Public Attitudes toward Immigration

Authors Shang E. Ha
Year 2010
Journal Name POLITICAL RESEARCH QUARTERLY
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15 Journal Article

The challenge of diversity through migration: refugee reception in the German federal state of Saxony

Authors Birgit Glorius
Year 2017
Journal Name Hungarian Geographical Bulletin
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17 Journal Article

MEDAM assessment report on asylum and migration policies in Europe

Authors Mikkel BARSLUND, Matthias LÜCKE, Martin RUHS
Description
In this 2019 MEDAM Assessment Report, we present insights from MEDAM research and policy dialogue since 2016 to explain how closer cooperation among EU member states and with countries of origin and transit can improve outcomes for all stakeholders. Crucially, short of establishing a new Iron Curtain on the EU’s external border or continuing to tolerate abuses, there is no way that either individual member states or the EU as a whole can insulate themselves from irregular migrants and asylum seekers. Yet, if crossing the EU border enabled all irregular migrants to remain in the EU for good, the integrity of EU visa and asylum policies would be undermined. Thus, close cooperation with countries of origin for the return and readmission of their citizens who have no right to remain in the EU is crucial. Still, it is typically not in the interest of countries of origin to limit the mobility of their citizens. Cooperation between the EU and countries of origin must therefore cover a wide enough range of policies to ensure that all parties consistently benefit from the policy package and have a strong incentive to meet their commitments. We emphasize more EU support for refugees hosted by low- and middle-income countries and more legal employment opportunities for non-EU citizens in the EU. Rethinking EU asylum and migration policies along these lines requires extensive consultations and negotiations among stakeholders in Europe and in countries of origin and transit. Our ‘insights’ are meant to inform and stimulate such conversations. However, sustainable reforms will come only as the result of stakeholders working out the details and developing a sense of ownership of the necessary reforms. Our first set of insights relates to popular attitudes toward immigration and the structure of public preferences for asylum and refugee protection policies (section 2 of this report). Next, we explain how the EU and countries of origin and transit can all benefit from cooperating on border management, refugee protection, and expanding legal labor migration to the EU (section 3). Finally, we consider the implications for cooperation among EU member states and the long-standing plans for reform of the European asylum system (section 4).
Year 2019
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18 Report

Opening the 'Black Box' of asylum governance : decision-making and the politics of asylum policy-making

Authors Andrea PETTRACHIN
Year 2019
Journal Name Italian political science review ; Rivista italiana di scienza politica, 2019, OnlineFirst
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20 Journal Article

Attitudes matter—welfare work and migration in Sweden

Authors Carolin Schütze
Year 2019
Journal Name Migration Studies
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24 Journal Article

La representación política de las personas de origen inmigrante en España e Italia

Authors Daniela Vintila, Laura Morales
Year 2018
Journal Name Papers: Revista de Sociologia
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25 Journal Article

Grounds for citizenship: Public attitudes in comparative perspective

Authors Asaf Levanon, Noah Lewin-Epstein
Year 2010
Journal Name Social Science Research
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26 Journal Article

The politics of European Union migration governance

Authors Andrew GEDDES
Year 2018
Journal Name JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies
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27 Journal Article

Countervailing contact: Community ethnic diversity, anti-immigrant attitudes and mediating pathways of positive and negative inter-ethnic contact in European societies

Authors James Laurence, Lee Bentley
Year 2018
Journal Name Social Science Research
Citations (WoS) 2
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28 Journal Article

"And Who Is My Neighbor?" Religion and Immigration Policy Attitudes

Authors Benjamin R. Knoll
Year 2009
Journal Name JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION
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29 Journal Article

Ethnic Diversity and Attitudes towards Immigrants: Evidence for Threat or Contact Effects?

Principal investigator Elmar Schlüter (Principal Investigator), Ulrich Wagner (Principal Investigator), Peer Scheepers (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives This project comprises two studies that use two different data sets to examine the influence of ethnic diversity on interethnic contacts and attitudes towards immigrants by drawing on insights from group threat and inter-group contact theory. The project advances over earlier research by a) opening the black box of the mediating mechanisms via which ethnic diversity – operationalised as the population share of immigrants – affects citizens' immigration policy preferences and interethnic contacts as well as b) testing competing propositions derived from contact and group threat theory at different individual and contextual levels of analysis. In the first study, we examine which role the size of the immigrant population plays in explaining immigrant derogation within and between European regions and consider the following question: does a larger size of immigrant population increase perceived group threat and thereby lead to greater immigrant derogation? Or does it increase intergroup contact and thereby ameliorate immigrant derogation? In the second study we derive competing hypotheses on the role the size of the immigrant population plays for explaining the anti-immigrant attitudes of Dutch citizens. Research design and methodology The first study uses regionalised European Social Survey 2002 and official data, which were analysed by means of multilevel structural equation modelling. The second study uses structural equation modelling with robust standard errors on nationally representative Dutch survey data enriched with official municipality-level statistics. Findings Both studies converge in demonstrating that ethnic diversity exerts dual effects in promoting interethnic contact, but also to produce prejudice. Perceived group threat is associated with immigrant derogation. However, intergroup contact reduces perceived group threat and thereby amends such derogation of immigrants. Between regions, our findings show that a larger size of the immigrant population increases both greater perceived group threat and intergroup contact. At the same time, the effects of perceived group threat and intergroup contact on immigrant derogation resemble those found within regions. In sum, these results lend evidence to the generalisability of both group threat and contact effects."
Year 2009
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30 Project

An analysis of public opinion toward undocumented immigration

Authors Thomas J. Espenshade, Charles A. Calhoun
Year 1993
Journal Name Population Research and Policy Review
Citations (WoS) 142
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31 Journal Article

Ethnic Diversity and Social Cohesion in Germany

Principal investigator Bram Lancee (Principal Investigator)
Description
"After more than half a century of mass immigration to Europe, the consequences of increasing ethnic diversity in Europe are far from clear. More specifically, one of the prominent questions on today’s research agenda is how ethnic diversity affects social cohesion and attitudes towards immigrants. This project aims to contribute to answering this question. Recently, ample attention has been paid to the relation between ethnic diversity and social cohesion in the neighbourhood. Putnam (2007), for example, claims that in the short run, immigration and ethnic diversity tend to reduce solidarity and social capital. Several scholars report that ethnic diversity affects social cohesion (Lancee & Dronkers 2011; Letki 2008; Tolsma, Van der Meer & Gesthuizen 2009; Putnam 2007; Gijsberts, van der Meer & Dagevos 2011; Alesina & La Ferrara 2000)and attitudes towards immigrants (Schlueter & Scheepers 2010; Pettigrew & Tropp 2006). To date, little longitudinal research has been done on the relation between ethnic diversity and social cohesion in Germany. The objective of this project is to carry out longitudinal analyses with the German Socio-Economic Panel Survey (GSOEP) and neighbourhood data on the zip code level. In short, I will examine the relation between neighbourhood diversity and indicators of social cohesion and attitudes toward immigration."
Year 2011
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32 Project

Assessing Effect of Bridging Social Capital on the Attitudes Toward Immigrants in the U.S.: Does Race Matter?

Authors Yoosun Chu, Jie Yang
Year 2019
Journal Name Race and Social Problems
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34 Journal Article

Polityka uchodźcza w Polsce. Ewolucja "pola uchodźczego" w latach 1990-2011

Year 2011
Journal Name Studia Migracyjne - Przegląd Polonijny
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35 Journal Article

German Public Opinion and the Refugee Crisis: Mechanisms of Support and Opposition

Principal investigator Ruud Koopmans (Principal Investigator), Jutta Allmendinger (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives Since the late Summer of 2015 Germany has experienced what is now already one of the largest immigration waves in its history, which moreover is occurring suddenly and within an unprecedentedly short span of time. Dynamics of public opinion on the topic have likewise been volatile, from initial hostile outbursts of anti-refugee collective action, to a massive wave of solidarity and support for refugees, and what seems to be a strong bifurcation of opinions later on. This project aims to investigate these dynamics while they are happening by fielding a survey on attitudes towards and social contacts with refugees, as well as on participation in pro-refugee or anti-refugee collective action. To get a handle on the mechanisms that drive opinions towards refugees, the survey includes several experiments. In a vignette experiment we measure how support for the granting of refugee status to an applicant depends on his or her profile, randomly varying reasons for seeking refuge in Germany (political persecution or economic hardship), religion (Muslim or Christian), level of education, and gender. By way of an authority support experiment we will be able to investigate to what extent support for pro- and anti-refugee statements depends on their endorsement by politicians of different political affiliations. The data allow to link respondents' attitudes to context variables, e.g. the ethnic composition of their community. The survey went into field in early November 2015. A second wave was done in summer 2016. Findings Results of the first wave showed an overall positive attitude towards granting asylum to refugees. With respect to the refugee profiles that were tested in the vignette experiment, the reason for seeking refuge (political persecution vs. economic hardship) was most decisive. The results are summarized in the WZB Mitteilungen No. 151, pp. 24-27. Furthermore, the current research tests how people's political attitudes are influenced by political elites when traditional party lines are blurred. In a representative sample of Germans, we assessed support for restrictive and lenient proposals regarding refugee admission in two experiments. For both statements, we find that citizens decrease their support when it is endorsed by political parties in a stereotypical fashion: conservative endorsement of a restrictive statement in Experiment 1 (marginally significant) and liberal endorsement of a lenient statement in Experiment 2 (significant). This suggests backlash to political elites who attempt to polarize. "
Year 2015
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36 Project

Crisis económica y sentimiento antinmigrante: el caso de Andalucía

Authors Sebastian Rinken
Year 2016
Journal Name Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas
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37 Journal Article

Public Opinion toward Immigration and the EU: How are Turkish Immigrants Different than Others?

Authors Başak Yavçan
Year 2013
Journal Name Turkish Studies
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39 Journal Article

The Market for Human Smuggling into Europe: A Macro Perspective

Authors Paolo Campana
Year 2017
Journal Name POLICING-A JOURNAL OF POLICY AND PRACTICE
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40 Journal Article

Reciprocity in welfare institutions and attitudes to free movement in EU receiving countries

Authors Moa MARTENSSON, Marcus ÖSTERMAN, Joakim PALME, ...
Year 2019
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41 Working Paper

How attitudes towards immigrants are shaped by residential context: The role of ethnic diversity dynamics and immigrant visibility

Authors Sjoerdje van Heerden, Didier Ruedin
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
Citations (WoS) 2
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42 Journal Article

Where the Wild Things Are: Fear of Islam and the Anti-Refugee Rhetoric in Hungary and in Poland

Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review,
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43 Journal Article

Contemporary immigration policy orientations among dominant-group members in Western Europe

Authors James S. Jackson, Kendrick T. Brown, Tony N. Brown, ...
Year 2001
Journal Name JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES
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44 Journal Article

Where the Wild Things Are: Fear of Islam and the Anti-Refugee Rhetoric in Hungary and in Poland

Authors Elżbieta M. Goździak, Péter Márton
Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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45 Journal Article

The Role of Geographic Context in the Local Politics of US Immigration

Authors Kyle E. Walker
Year 2014
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 5
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46 Journal Article

The Power of Citizenship: How Inclusion Affects Attitudes on Social Benefits Among Naturalized Citizens and Foreign Residents

Authors Melanie Kolbe, Markucs Crepaz
Year 2016
Journal Name Comparative Politics
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47 Journal Article

Attitudes to Migrants, Communication and Local Leadership

Principal investigator Joaquín Arango (Principal Investigator)
Description
MICALL was a transnational action research project, co-ordinated by COMPAS, exploring the role of Local and Regional Authorities (LRAs) in communicating with their citizens about the difficult questions raised by migration. Led by a partnership of six European research institutions, with the Council of Europe as an associate partner, the project provided a platform for the sharing of good practice and the development of new strategies for the communication of positive attitudes towards migrants and migrant integration at the local and regional level. Work began in early 2011 with each partner identifying the context within which LRAs in the six target countries are working, producing country context reports to ground the comparative research. The partners then embarked on fieldwork, including desk research and interviews with key LRA officials, NGOs and experts to ascertain what, if any, communications activities have been undertaken by local government in each of the countries, focusing on a series of in-depth case studies. Each partner sought to identify successful initiatives as well as barriers to success in each country, region and city involved, which were reflected on in technical workshops with practitioners. The second half of the project focused on the policy lessons that can be drawn from the initial research.
Year 2011
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48 Project

Information and discrimination in the rental housing market: Evidence from a field experiment

Authors Mariano Bosch, M. Angeles Carnero, Lidia Farre
Year 2010
Journal Name REGIONAL SCIENCE AND URBAN ECONOMICS
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50 Journal Article

Vijfentwintig jaar onderzoek naar de houding tegenover migranten in België. Verandering en stabiliteit in de periode 1991-2014

Authors Jaak Billiet, Koen Abts, Jolien Galle, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Sociologos
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51 Journal Article

Migration und Flucht als Forschungsthemen der Geographie

Authors Andreas Pott, Antonie Schmiz
Year 2018
Journal Name Standort
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54 Journal Article

Immigration, Integration und Einbürgerung: Neuzuwanderer, Policy Entscheidungen und Reaktionen von StaatsbürgerInnen

Principal investigator Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator ), Richard Traunmüller (Principal Investigator )
Description
Die Art und Weise wie Migrationsströme und die Integration vonMigranten reguliert werden ist zu einem zentralen Gegenstandöffentlicher und akademischer Debatten geworden. Während es vielForschung zur Frage gibt wie viele Migranten in ein Land gelassenwerden sollen, wissen wir noch relativ wenig darüber wie spezifischeRegulierungen von BürgerInnen wahrgenommen werden und wie sichdiese Regulierungen auf ihre Einstellungen und ihr Verhalten undschlussendlich auf die Akzeptanz von Immigranten auswirken. Zieldieses Projekts ist es, evidenzbasierte Antworten auf folgende Fragezu finden: Was sind die Folgen von Immigrations-, Integrations- undEinbürgerungspolitik auf die Einstellungen und das Verhaltengegenüber Immigranten. Um Antworten auf diese Fragen zu finden,werden zwei Umfragen mit verschiedenen Umfrageexperimenten in Deutschland durchgeführt. Die Experimente erlauben uns, denkausalen Einfluss von Policies auf Einstellungen und Verhalten insystematischerer Weise zu untersuchen. Um diese Policyeffektegenauer zu untersuchen, werden die befragten Personen mitUmfragevignetten konfrontiert. Um die rationalen Interessen vonBürgerInnen besser zu verstehen, werden die Policyeinflüsse inAbhängigkeit der Akzeptanz zu diesen Regulierungen gemessen.Darüber hinaus untersuchen wir, ob diese Effekte davon beeinflusstwerden, ob sich durch die Regulierungen der Status Quo für diebefragten BürgerInnen verändert.
Year 2019
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55 Project

Social factors influencing immigration attitudes: an analysis of data from the General Social Survey

Authors CR Chander, YM Tsai
Year 2001
Journal Name SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNAL
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56 Journal Article

Swedish retirement migrants to Spain and migrant workers: interlinked migration chains and their consequences to work and care in Ageing Europe

Principal investigator Anna Gavanas (REMESO Project Leader), Dr Ines Calzada (Participants not from REMESO)
Description
In Swedish public discourse, retirees born in the 1940s are considered a growing cohort of relatively wealthy consumers, with more cosmopolitan preferences and habits, and different demands compared to previous generations. Swedish retirees are part of a growing stream of Northern Europeans who migrate to Southern Europe to retire in the sun. Exploring the relations between streams of migrants who meet in Spain, and their intermediaries, this project explores issues of mobility and the globalization of care/service, of crucial importance to welfare states and the future of work, elderly care and retirement conditions in Ageing Europe.
Year 2013
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57 Project

AMICALL: Attitudes to Migrants, Communication and Local Leadership'

Description
AMICALL was a transnational action research project, co-ordinated by COMPAS, exploring the role of Local and Regional Authorities (LRAs) in communicating with their citizens about the difficult questions raised by migration. Led by a partnership of six European research institutions, with the Council of Europe as an associate partner, the project provided a platform for the sharing of good practice and the development of new strategies for the communication of positive attitudes towards migrants and migrant integration at the local and regional level. The research was undertaken in the United Kingdom, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain. Work began in early 2011 with each partner identifying the context within which LRAs in the six target countries are working, producing country context reports to ground the comparative research. The partners then embarked on fieldwork, including desk research and interviews with key LRA officials, NGOs and experts to ascertain what, if any, communications activities have been undertaken by local government in each of the countries, focusing on a series of in-depth case studies. Each partner sought to identify successful initiatives as well as barriers to success in each country, region and city involved, which were reflected on in technical workshops with practitioners. The second half of the project focused on the policy lessons that can be drawn from the initial research.
Year 2011
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58 Project

Warmth of the Welcome: Attitudes Toward Immigrants and Immigration Policy in the United States

Authors Elizabeth Fussell
Year 2014
Journal Name ANNUAL REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY, VOL 40
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59 Journal Article

National identity and attitudes towards immigration in Australia

Authors Ian McAllister
Year 2018
Journal Name NATIONAL IDENTITIES
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61 Journal Article

Regional variations in attitudes towards refugees: Evidence from Great Britain

Authors Heaven Crawley, Stephen Drinkwater, Rukhsana Kauser
Year 2013
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62 Working Paper

Taking cues on multidimensional issues: the case of attitudes toward immigration

Authors Timothy Hellwig, Yesola Kweon
Year 2016
Journal Name WEST EUROPEAN POLITICS
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63 Journal Article

‘Bloom where you’re planted’: explaining public opposition to (e)migration

Authors Alexander Kustov
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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64 Journal Article

Adapting to party lines: the effect of party affiliation on attitudes to immigration

Authors Eelco Harteveld, Andrej Kokkonen, Stefan Dahlberg
Year 2017
Journal Name WEST EUROPEAN POLITICS
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65 Journal Article

Side Effects of Multiculturalism: The Interaction Effect of a Multicultural Ideology and Authoritarianism on Prejudice and Diversity Beliefs

Authors Mathias Kauff, Frank Asbrock, Stefan Thörner, ...
Year 2013
Journal Name PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BULLETIN
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66 Journal Article

Die Innenseite von Integration und Akkulturation – Die Lebenszufriedenheit von Migranten in Europa

Principal investigator Irena Kogan (Principal Investigator)
Description
Es soll analysiert werden, was die subjektive Lebensqualität – definiert als Lebenszufriedenheit – von Migranten in Europa bedingt und inwieweit bestimmte Länder für bestimmte Zuwanderergruppen in dieser Hinsicht besonders günstige, für andere demgegenüber eher ungünstige Bedingungen bieten. Die Lebenszufriedenheit wird als das Ergebnis der Evaluation der konkreten objektiven Lebensbedingungen durch die Akteure modelliert, bei welcher sie einen individuellen Bewertungsmaßstab heranziehen. Dieser Bewertungsmaßstab hängt u.a. von der kulturellen Prä¬gung, dem Vergleich mit signifikanten anderen und den individuellen Präferenzen ab. Somit kann die Lebenszufriedenheit zwischen Bevölkerungsgruppen auch bei vergleichbaren objektiven Lebensbedingungen variieren, wenn der Bewertungsmaßstab gruppenspezifisch variiert. Die direkten Lebensbedingungen der Migranten werden wiederum durch die strukturelle und kulturelle Ordnung der jeweiligen Gesellschaft beeinflusst: z.B. durch die Ausgestaltung wohlfahrtstaatlicher Leistungen oder die allgemeinen Einstellungen gegenüber Einwanderern. Vor dem Hintergrund zunehmender internationaler Konkurrenz um Fachkräfte kann das geplante Projekt dabei helfen, die Attraktivität von Standorten differenzierter zu bewerten. Für die Analysen soll zunächst auf international vergleichende Datensätze und für differenziertere Auswertungen anschließend auf geeignete nationale Daten zurückgegriffen werden.
Year 2010
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67 Project

The importance of discretion for welfare services to minorities: Examining workload and anti‐immigration attitudes

Authors Carolin Schütze, Håkan Johansson
Year 2019
Journal Name Australian Journal of Public Administration
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69 Journal Article

Whither will they go? A global study of refugees' destinations, 1965-1995

Authors Will H. Moore, Stephen M. Shellman
Year 2007
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL STUDIES QUARTERLY
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70 Journal Article

Past to Present: Do Historical Institutions of Terror Influence People's Outgroup Attitudes Today?

Principal investigator Ruth Katharina Ditlmann (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Theoretical background and objectives Incidents that happened several hundred years ago still have a great influence on the world we live in today. For example, Nunn (2008) found a direct connection between the degree of African slave trade between 1400 and 1900 and the current economic situation of a region today. Other studies found a positive link between the presence of a missionary before 1904 and literacy rates in villages in Africa and South America today (Cage & Rueda, 2016; Caicedo, 2014). In the P2P project we examine, whether the presence of an institution of terror in Nazi Germany still influences the attitudes towards outgroups and support for right wing radicalism of the residence in the area today. We focus on concentration and work camps in Germany between 1933 and 1945 and compare districts in the surroundings of former institutions of terror to those without a concentration or work camp in the direct or distantneighbourhood.While there is a vast literature on how exposure to past injustice shapes present day outgroup attitudes (Adena, Enikolopov, Petrova, Santarosa & Zhuravskaya, 2015; Feyrer & Sacerdote, 2009), no prior research has investigated the effect of former concentration camps on Germans of today. We are eager to close this research-gap, since the literature on the effect of other historical institutions, e.g. colonialism or on contemporary attitudes, is very promising (Rink, 2016). Methodologically, we use a quasi-experimental approach and combine it with quantitative measures. We are going to analyze election results, socio-economic measures, as well as attitudes towards immigrants and Germany, and take the potential influence of holocaust memorial work into account."
Year 2017
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71 Project

Informal Plurilateralism: The Impossibility of Multilateralism in the Steering of Migration

Authors Christina Oelgemoeller
Year 2011
Journal Name BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
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73 Journal Article

Public opinion, mobilizations and policies concerning asylum seekers and refugees in anti-immigrants times (Europe and Belgium)

Principal investigator Andrea Rea (Coordinator), Marco Martiniello (Partner), Bart Meuleman (Partner)
Description
The European challenges in the field of migration have an impact on society, since the division between them opposed to newcomers and welcoming them has been continuously increasing. The project addresses the perceptions of the Belgian and European population about refugees/migrants and vice versa as well as their interactions with the policy agenda of asylum and migration with a European comparative perspective and a specific focus on Belgium. As Europe face important migratory challenges and political difficulties we have seen an increase of the public opinion’s polarisation regarding asylum and refugees, it is important to address this question. Including teams from our project will analyse this polarisation and its links to policies, as it is necessary for a better understanding of the current debate on migration in Europe and Belgium. The 2015 asylum crisis will be considered as indicative of the general European and Belgian citizens’ reactions about migration. The focus is then on attitudes, representations, discourses and practices about refugees, on the interactions at the local level between the majority populations and newly arrived migrants. The project will follow two objectives. First studying public opinion towards asylum seekers and refugees with a European cross- national perspective but also how these groups perceive Belgium, its asylum system and its reception policies. The second objective is to analyse the polarisation of the public opinion by focussing on pro and anti-refugees’ actions at the local level. This will allow understanding the links between public opinion and the implementation of asylum and reception policies. In order to fulfil these objectives, our project is based on 5 Work Packages that each focus on a specific dimension. The first two ones aim at developing a European comparative perspective on perceptions towards migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. This then includes a quantitative analysis of public opinion’s perceptions towards new immigration flows as well as a comparison of 5 European case studies (Sweden, Italy, Grece, Hungary and Germany). The three other work packages aim at a deep analysis of the Belgian situation. First, they consist of understanding actions and reactions towards asylum seekers and refugees at a local level. This implies to study the opposite reactions with an in-depth analysis of their content, justifications and determinants but also to focus on interactions between social groups (pro vs. anti migrants groups; ional citizens & refugees) as well as the interactions between the population’s reaction and the implementation of asylum and receptions policies. Second, studying the Belgian situation implies to analyse asylum seekers and refugees perceptions regarding the country’s asylum and reception policies. Lastly, it implies to realise a policy evaluation of those policies.
Year 2017
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74 Project

Readmission, return and reintegration of migrants in Ukraine : socio-political context

Authors Ekateryna IVASCHENKO-STADNIK
Description
The ambivalent socio-political processes that have accompanied the formulation of the Ukrainianposition on the readmission of various migrant groups from the EU, CIS and other countries havedetermined a high risk of the formation of a marginalized readmission space33 in its territory. Despitethe slow but steady progress made in the discussion on and development of a multilateral legal framework in this field, the institutional and implementation gap between what is currently in place inUkraine and internationally accepted standards for readmission,return and reintegration remainsessential. The high levels of xenophobia among the population of Ukraine in relation to certain ethnic groups,35 heated by the radical nationalist movements gaining popularity, have created geopoliticaland societal conditions for the diversion of public perception in a direction unfavorable to the future ofthe Ukrainian state and society. The current actualization of the strategic goals of the ‘EasternPartnership’ could be an incentiefor Ukraine to harmonize its political and legal systems, as well asto mobilize public resources for the implementation of comprehensive reforms related to migration.36
Year 2013
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76 Report

Beyond crisis talk : interrogating migration and crises in Europe

Authors Nick DINES, Nicola MONTAGNA, Elena VACCHELLI
Year 2018
Journal Name Sociology
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77 Journal Article

Mooring “super-diversity” to a brutal migration milieu

Authors Suzanne M. Hall, Suzanne Hall
Year 2017
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 12
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78 Journal Article

"Cultures of Inequality": Ethnicity, Immigration, Social Welfare, and Imprisonment

Authors Robert D. Crutchfield, David Pettinicchio
Year 2009
Journal Name The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
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79 Journal Article

Welfare and Immigration

Authors Alan BARRETT
Description
This paper contains a review of the economics literature on the issue of the relationship between immigration and welfare. The review is organised around two questions. First, are immigrants, especially low-skilled immigrants, attracted to welfare-generous states? Second, are immigrants more likely to be recipients of welfare compared to natives? The evidence with respect to both questions suggests that the more extreme fears sometimes expressed in public discourse are exaggerated. While some groups of immigrants might be attracted to welfare-generous states, the effect is unlikely to be significant in terms of public budgets. Similarly, while examples do appear of certain sub-groups of immigrants using welfare more intensively than natives, there are many examples where the opposite holds or where no difference is found. In spite of these findings, a case can still be made that policies should be adopted which convince native populations that excess welfare use by immigrants cannot arise. Such policies may be needed if on-going immigration, which is desirable on many grounds, is to avoid negative political pressure.
Year 2012
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80 Report

Brexit and the perils of 'Europeanised' migration

Authors Andrew GEDDES, James DENNISON
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of European Public Policy
Citations (WoS) 7
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81 Journal Article

The Impact of Stigmatisation upon Russian and Russian-Speaking Migrants Living in Scotland

Authors Ruth McKenna
Year 2017
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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84 Journal Article

Humanitarian reason and the representation and management of migrant agricultural labour

Authors Nick DINES
Year 2018
Journal Name Theomai : estudios críticos sobre sociedad y desarrollo ; Theomai journal : society and development critical studies, 2018, No. 38, pp. 37–53
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85 Journal Article

Economic insecurity, prejudicial stereotypes, and public opinion on immigration policy

Authors PETER BURNS, JAMES G. GIMPEL
Year 2000
Journal Name POLITICAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY
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86 Journal Article

Economic conditions, group relative deprivation and ethnic threat perceptions: a cross-national perspective

Authors Bart Meuleman, Koen Abts, Peter Schmidt, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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87 Journal Article

Migration to Germany: Structures, processes, and discourses

Authors Birgit Glorius
Year 2018
Journal Name Regional Statistics
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88 Journal Article

Emigration agents and the agency of the urban press : approaches to Transatlantic migration in Hungary, 1880s–1914

Authors Katalin STRANER
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Migration History
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91 Journal Article

Extreme right-wing voting in Western Europe

Authors Marcel Lubbers, Mérove Gijsberts, Peer Scheepers
Year 2002
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL RESEARCH
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92 Journal Article

Ukrainian Migration to Poland: A “Local” Mobility?

Authors Marta Kindler, Zuzanna Brunarska, Monika Szulecka, ...
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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93 Book Chapter

Refugee Organizations’ Public Communication: Conceptualizing and Exploring New Avenues for an Underdeveloped Research Subject

Authors David Ongenaert
Year 2019
Journal Name Media and Communication
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94 Journal Article

Anti-immigrant prejudice in Europe: Contact, threat perception, and preferences for the exclusion of migrants

Authors L. M. McLaren
Year 2003
Journal Name Social Forces
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99 Journal Article
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