Human Biology and Medicine

Showing page of 478 results, sorted by

Ethical and Professional Considerations Providing Medical Evaluation and Care to Refugee Asylum Seekers

Authors Ramin Asgary, Clyde L. Smith
Year 2013
Journal Name AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BIOETHICS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
1 Journal Article

Experiences of Karen refugees with traditional and western medicine in the USA

Authors Natalie R. Wodniak
Year 2018
Journal Name International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
2 Journal Article

Changing health along the Syrian refugees trajectories to Norway. Somatic and mental health relationships and implication for treatment.

Principal investigator Esperanza Diaz (Principal Investigator)
Description
Norway received over 30.000 asylum seekers in 2015 and the number of refugees in the country will soon reach a total of 200.000. Refugees living in Norway have higher burden of disease than other migrants and are underrepresented in the labour market. The associations between somatic and mental health for this population is barely explored, but several studies show the challenge of adequately diagnosing immigrants from non-Western countries with specific diseases, which hinders correct treatment and rehabilitation processes, and decreases the satisfaction of patients with the health care system. Although the healthy immigrant effect is described also for refugees and there is evidence of rapid deterioration of their health once in the host country, little is known about the interactive development of somatic and mental disease through the migration path, this is to say, pre-departure, at interception and at destination, for these patients. For asylum seekers and refugees from Syria on their way to or already living in Norway, this project will determine the risk factors for negative development of somatic and mental health and for increase of unmet health care needs, through the different stages of the migration process. Also, the clinical implications of the associations between mental and somatic health will be tested by measuring the effect of two different treatments, individual physiotherapy and group-based psychological treatment, on both somatic and mental health. Therefore, our results will provide valuable information about the high health risk stages of the migration path, enabling preventive strategies at these points, and about the implications of the interactions between somatic and mental health for the design of health care for asylum seekers and refugees. Although our study will only include refugees from Syria through to enable a trajectory approach, we believe our results will universally apply to any asylum seeker/refugee group.
Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
3 Project

The system of asylum legislation in the Republic of Belarus

Authors Oleg BAKHUR
Description
National legislation complies with universally recognised norms of the international law, in particular: the definition of the ?refugee? notion, grounds for granting refugee status and subsidiary protection comply with similar provisions of international legal documents (in particular, the 1951 UN Convention ?Relating to the Status of Refugees?). Belarus ratified international treaties on economic, social and cultural, civil and political rights and joined the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others. Foreign citizens applying for recognition as refugees as well as recognised refugees enjoy special privileges and may count on certain types of aid on behalf of the state. In particular, according to the national legislation in Belarus, socio-economic rights of refugees are equal to the rights of citizens of the Republic of Belarus, refugees are granted free access to the national system of education and health system. Children of refugees enjoy the right to attend preschool facilities. Currently the drawback of the national legislative system in the discussed area is underregulation of issues related to refugee integration, conditions for their active participation in the life of society, ensuring equal rights and opportunities for men and women. Besides, representation of legal provisions in a multitude of statutory acts, including by-laws and decisions of state agencies, makes their application inconvenient. It also has a negative effect on the quality of cooperation and coordination of work of public authorities when addressing issues related to granting asylum.
Year 2012
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
4 Report

Irregular Migration in Egypt

Authors Heba NASSAR
Description
Egypt’s capital Cairo hosts one of the five largest urban refugee populations in the world. For this reason, our paper concentrates on the legal aspect of irregular migration, discussing the characteristics of these migrants as asylum seekers and refugees while also examining transit migrants. First, the paper tackles associated concepts and data issues, with reference to the existing literature and international standards. In the second part, an overview of the Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA) situation is given as a prelude to the Egyptian experience. In the third part, the socio-economic profile of refugees and asylum seekers from Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Iraq is given with reference to their legal status, their rights and their living conditions measured in terms of income and sources of income, access to education, employment, health care and social services. The paper concludes by looking at the socio-economic situation in Egypt and policy recommendations concerning government practices, procedures, mechanisms, policies and laws. Gaps in research have also been highlighted so that these issues can be better addressed in the future.
Year 2008
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
5 Report

Social and economic rights of refugees and displaced persons in Azerbaijan

Authors Alovsat ALIYEV
Description
Patronage of the country is not limited to identifying the status of a refugee and displaced person and providing them with certain documents; it also deals with ensuring and protecting their social and economic rights. Azerbaijan is a post-Soviet country with a lot of refugees and displaced persons: 300 thousand naturalized refugees, 760 thousand displaced persons, around 2 thousand persons seeking political asylum and thousands of persons whose status is unclear1 This report aims to analyze current situation from the standpoint of legislation in the field refugee rights, namely right to labor and certain labor conditions, right to social protection and social security, access to public service, right to be provided with meals, clothes and residence, right to medical care, rights in the field of family relations and right to education. . From the first days of independence, the Republic of Azerbaijan has been taking steps to improve legislation and strengthen government agencies that are involved in legal relations with asylum seekers, refugees and displaced persons and are in charge of their social protection. Azerbaijan acceded to all UN Conventions relating to refugees and introduced certain changes into national legislation in accordance with these conventions. In addition to that, Azerbaijan is making efforts to solve the problems of displaced persons relying on UNHCR Guiding Principles. In addition to the law “On status of refugees and forcibly displaced (persons displaced within the country) persons”2 , which is the main law regulating rights of refugees and displaced persons, Azerbaijan also adopted some normative acts to enforce that law3 On May 21, 1999 the law “On social protection of displaced persons and persons . 4 equalized to them” was adopted. This law defines obligations of government bodies regarding accommodation of displaced persons and persons equalized to them (hereinafter referred to as displaced persons), their social protection etc.
Year 2013
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
6 Report

How resilient were OECD health care systems during the “refugee crisis”?

Authors Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Year 2018
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
7 Policy Brief

Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies au Maroc

Authors Khadija ELMADMAD
Description
(En) Morocco has long been a country of asylum seekers and refugees from various origin countries. Currently, in Morocco, refugees and asylum seekers are mainly from African and Middle-Eastern countries. Morocco is party to the Refugee’s Convention (1951) and its additional Protocol (1967). Morocco has ratified the Agreement of 23rd November 1957 on maritime refugees as well as its protocol. In 1957, Morocco adopted a law on the implementation modalities of the Geneva Convention related to the refugee status. This law enables the Office of Refugee and Stateless persons (ORS) for the administrative and legal protection of refugees. The law, as it stands, is too general and the ORS has ceased its activities. In spite of it being short lived, Moroccan Law refers to the Geneva Convention (1951) and thus to the rights related to refugee status in terms of the right to work, to education, to health, to freedom of movement etc (article 12-34). UNHCR has had an official representation in Morocco since 1965, through an honorary delegation, and since 2007 it has had diplomatic representation in the country. Because of the absence of any effective national procedure in the field of asylum, UNHCR registers asylum seekers and determines the refugee statute. The UNHCR office deals with all asylum claims and decides on the recognition of refugee status in Morocco. The refugees recognised in Morocco by UNHCR do not benefit from all the rights normally associated with the refugee statute in the Geneva Convention (1951). The Moroccan authorities do not automatically deliver a stay permit which is a necessary condition for migrants wishing to enjoy their rights. Since 2007, UNHCR in Rabat, in partnership with some local NGOs, is active in supporting recognised refugees. UNHCR’s presence in Morocco, in particular, its recent diplomatic representation in the country is considered by some experts and civil society actors as a sign of the ‘externalisation’ of European borders brought about by the EU’s European Immigration and Asylum policy. (Fr) Le Maroc a été depuis toujours un pays de réfugiés et de demandeurs d’asile pour plusieurs peuples venant de plusieurs pays. Actuellement les réfugiés et les demandeurs d’asile au Maroc proviennent principalement des pays africains et du Moyen Orient. Le Maroc a adhéré à la Convention de 1951 et à son Protocole additionnel de1967. Il a également ratifié l'Arrangement du 23 novembre 1957 relatif aux marins réfugiés et le Protocole à cet Arrangement. En 1957, le Maroc a adopté une loi qui a fixé les modalités d'application de la Convention de Genève relative au statut des réfugiés et qui a confié la protection juridique et administrative des réfugiés au Bureau des Réfugiés et Apatrides (BRA). Mais cette loi est assez peu détaillée et le BRA a presque cessé actuellement toute activité. Malgré son caractère bref et assez peu explicite, la législation marocaine se réfère à la Convention de Genève de 1951 qui accorde des droits bien précis aux personnes reconnues comme réfugiés, comme le droit au travail, à l’éducation et à la santé, à la liberté de circulation etc.(articles 12 à 34). Le HCR est représenté officiellement au Maroc depuis 1965, tout d’abord à travers une délégation honoraire puis par une représentation diplomatique en 2007. En l’absence d’une procédure nationale effective en matière d’asile, c’est le HCR qui enregistre les demandeurs d’asile et conduit la détermination du statut de réfugié. Le bureau du HCR traite ainsi toutes les demandes d’asile, détermine et reconnaît le statut de réfugié dans le pays. Les réfugiés au Maroc reconnus par le HCR ne bénéficient pas de tous les droits inclus dans la Convention de Genève de 1951. Les autorités marocaines ne leur délivrent pas automatiquement une carte de séjour qui leur permettra de jouir de leurs droits de réfugiés dans le pays. En partenariat avec certaines ONG locales, le HCR à Rabat est actif dans l’accompagnement des réfugiés reconnus, particulièrement depuis 2007. La présence du HCR au Maroc et son installation diplomatique dans le pays depuis 2007 est considérée par certains spécialistes en migration et par des acteurs de la société civile comme l’une des manifestations de l’externalisation des frontières européennes, du fait de la politique commune d’immigration et d’asile développée par l’Union Européenne.
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
8 Report

Macroeconomic evidence suggests that asylum seekers are not a "burden" for Western European countries

Authors Hippolyte d'Albis, Ekrame Boubtane, Dramane Coulibaly
Year 2018
Journal Name SCIENCE ADVANCES
Citations (WoS) 4
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
9 Journal Article

Intimate Partner Violence Among Iraqi Immigrant Women in Metro Detroit: A Pilot Study

Authors Evone Barkho, Monty Fakhouri, Judith E. Arnetz
Year 2011
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Citations (WoS) 16
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
10 Journal Article

Comparative overview of national protection statuses in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)

Authors Adolfo Sommarribas, Ralph Petry, Birte Nienaber
Description
Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the temporary protection statuses, the Luxembourgish legal system foresees two humanitarian statuses which are: a) residence permit for private reasons based on serious humanitarian grounds; b) the postponement of removal based on medical reasons. In regard to the latter, there are the following steps: 1) the postponement of removal can be granted and renewed for up to 24 months; 2) after 2 years, if the medical condition persists, an authorisation of stay for medical reasons may be granted and a residence permit for private reasons may be issued. However, it is important to stress at this point that the Luxembourgish authorities do not consider the two aforementioned residence permits issued according to articles 78 (3) and 131 (2) of the Immigration Law as “protection statuses” as such, but precisely as residence permits issued to the applicant. The granting of these two “protection statuses” are based on the discretionary power of the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum. The residence permit for private reasons based on humanitarian grounds (Status A of this report) allows for the Minister to grant an authorisation to stay in the country to an irregular migrant if s/he is in in need to stay based on humanitarian reasons of exceptional circumstances. There is not an exhaustive list of reasons on which the Minister can base his/her decision. However, there is an exhaustive analysis of the reasons advance by the applicant. Any third country national irregularly staying on the territory can apply for this residence permit. However, in the case of rejected asylum seekers, the application will be rejected if the applicant advances the same reasons that s/he advanced during the international protection procedure. On the contrary, the residence permit for medical reasons requires that, in the first stage, the applicant had received a return decision and an order to leave the territory. In order to obtain the residence permit, he/she has to obtain first a decision for a postponement of removal for medical reasons that has to be renewed for two years before the applicant can file the application for the residence permit based on medical reasons. This residence permit is not granted automatically and if the applicant does not file his/her application after expiration of the postponement of removal for medical reasons after two years, s/he will be precluded and the return decision will be executed, except if s/he proves that s/he cannot be returned for medical reasons. In this case, the entire procedure will have to start again.
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
11 Report

Sexual and reproductive health of asylum seeking and refugee women in South Africa: understanding the determinants of vulnerability

Authors Jane Freedman, Tamaryn L. Crankshaw, Victoria M. Mutambara
Year 2020
Journal Name Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
12 Journal Article

New technologies and EU law

Authors Marise CREMONA
Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
13 Book

"I prefer dying fast than dying slowly", how institutional abuse worsens the mental health of stranded Syrian, Afghan and Congolese migrants on Lesbos island following the implementation of EU-Turkey deal

Authors Christos Eleftherakos, Wilma van den Boogaard, Declan Barry, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name Conflict and Health
Citations (WoS) 1
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
15 Journal Article

Access to health for refugees in Greece: lessons in inequalities

Authors Antonis A. Kousoulis, Myrsini Ioakeim-Ioannidou, Konstantinos P. Economopoulos
Year 2016
Journal Name International Journal for Equity in Health
Citations (WoS) 15
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
17 Journal Article

Migration and the diversity of healthcare structures in Berlin: Integrating epidemiological and ethnographic approaches

Principal investigator Hansjörg Dilger (Principal Investigator)
Description
The study group intends to explore the relationships of different migrant populations with the increasingly diversified and stratified health system in Berlin. During the pilot phase researchers from anthropology, public health and medicine will develop interdisciplinary research designs and establish a dense network connecting scientists, researchers and experts from healthcare institutions in and beyond Berlin. It is envisaged to establish models for the integration of qualitative data about subjective experiences of sickness and health, observations of interactions between patients, health staff and religious healers, and epidemiological data on social and biological aspects of disease.
Year 2008
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
18 Project

Syrian refugees in Greece: experience with violence, mental health status, and access to information during the journey and while in Greece

Authors Jihane Ben Farhat, Karl Blanchet, Pia Juul Bjertrup, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name BMC medicine
Citations (WoS) 15
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
19 Journal Article

Cardiovascular Disease Screening Among Immigrants from Eight World Regions

Authors Megan M. Reynolds, Megan M. Reynolds, Trenita B. Childers, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
20 Journal Article

Asylum seekers and health

Authors English, R Mussell, J Sheather, ...
Year 2004
Journal Name JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
23 Journal Article

Inequalities by immigrant status in unmet needs for healthcare in Europe : the role of origin, nationality and economic resources

Authors Caterina Francesca GUIDI, Laia PALÈNCIA, Silvia FERRINI, ...
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
25 Working Paper

Standing up for the medical rights of asylum seekers

Authors RE Ashcroft
Year 2005
Journal Name JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
26 Journal Article

Healthcare Access for Syrian Refugees in Istanbul: A Gender-sensitive Perspective

Description
This report presents the results of the half-day workshop and propose concrete, policy-relevant recommendations on how to facilitate Syrian refugees’ and especially refugee women’s access to healthcare services in Turkey.The workshop was designed to leverage partic-ipants’ expertise to discuss the gender-specific problems and barriers facing Syrian refugee women in reaching healthcare services, continuing service gaps, and ongoing initiatives to facilitate refugees’ access to healthcare. The workshop aimed to develop constructive recommendations that are based on evaluations from the field about the prob-lems refugees face in accessing healthcare services and how to improve refugee and healthcare policy and overall accessibility. The workshop was an opportunity for participants to exchange and share ideas as well as offering participants the chance to network. The workshop discussions were held in Turkish, Arabic, and English with simultaneous interpretation. The simultaneous interpretation was an avenue for participants to communicate with each other and engage with the knowledge of other experts in the field, especially as this exchange is not always possible due to language barriers. The roundtable workshop included 19 participants representing a broad variety of key stakeholder positions including Syrian and Turkish NGO members, community center representatives, independent public health experts and medical professionals working in Istanbul, and academics conducting research in the field.
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
27 Report

Die Vielfalt der Bedürfnisse und Zukunftsvisionen von Geflüchteten

Principal investigator Susanne Becker (Principal Investigator ), Annett Fleischer (Principal Investigator ), Miriam Schader (Principal Investigator ), Steven Vertovc (Principal Investigator ), Shahd Seethaler-Wari (Principal Investigator )
Description
"Projektbeschreibung 2015 reisten mehr als eine Million Schutzsuchende nach Deutschland ein. Eine so große Zahl an Neuankömmlingen in einer so kurzen Zeit stellt das Land vor neue Herausforderungen.Deshalb besteht die dringende Notwendigkeit mehr über Asylsuchende, ihre Situation und Lebensumstände zu erfahren. Das Forschungsprojekt hat daher zwei Ziele: 1. Die Vielfalt der Bedürfnisse und Zukunftsvisionen von Geflüchteten soll untersucht werden. Dabei spielen die Wohnsituation, das Familienleben, der Zugang zu (Aus-)Bildung und dem Arbeitsmarkt sowie der Aufenthaltsstatus eine entscheidende Rolle. 2. Das Projekt betrachtet des Weiteren, wie staatliche und nicht-staatliche Akteure auf die Vielfalt der Fluchtbewegungen reagieren, z.B. wie logistische Herausforderungen angegangen werden. Der Zweck der Forschung? Die Ergebnisse sollen einen Beitrag zum besseren Verständnis der Vielfalt der derzeit Zugewanderten und der Strukturen, mit denen sie konfrontiert werden, leisten. Des Weiteren soll das Projekt dazu beitragen, die Grundlagen für langfristige Partizipation der Geflüchteten an gesellschaftlichen Prozessen zu verstehen. Wer wir sind Das Forschungsteam arbeitet am Max-Planck-Institut zur Erforschung multireligiöser und multiethnischer Gesellschaften in Göttingen und setzt sich aus vier Wissenschaftlerinnen und mehreren Assistenten zusammen. Das Projekt wird von der gemeinnützigen Volkswagen-Stiftung gefördert. "
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
28 Project

Les Réfugies Irakiens au Liban

Authors Hassan JOUNI
Description
Résumé L’invasion américaine en Irak a entraîné des flux massifs de réfugiés vers le Liban, pays avec lequel les Irakiens entretiennent depuis longtemps des relations étroites. Près de 80% d’entre eux y vivent dans l’illégalité sans réel espoir de voir leur situation se régulariser. Le Liban n’est pas partie à la Convention des N-U relative au statut des réfugiés. Le système juridique connaît l’institution de l’asile mais celle-ci ne connaît pas de pratique effective. L’action du HCR au Liban est organisée sur base d’un Mémorandum of understanding qui devait organiser les modalités de la protection temporaire des Irakiens mais dont l’application s’avère difficile. La plus part des réfugiés irakiens qui bénéficient d’un séjour légal, soit une infime minorité, sont passés par une procédure de régularisation nationale. Les autres vivent dans l’illégalité, soumis aux risques de la détention et de l’expulsion en violation du principe de non refoulement. Ils travaillent en noir et payent au prix cher l’accès au logement et à la santé, sans pouvoir accéder à la propriété en leur qualité d’étranger. …………… Abstract The American invasion in Iraq led to massive refugee influxes into Lebanon, a country with which Iraqis have long had links. 80% of Iraqis in Lebanon live there illegally without any real hope of seeing their situation improve. Lebanon is not party to the 1951 UN Convention related to the refugee status. And though asylum exists in the Lebanese legal system, it is without effective application. The UNHCR action in Lebanon is based on a Memorandum of understanding which organizes the temporary protection of Iraqis but that has many problems in terms of application. Most Iraqi refugees who are legal, a very small minority, went through the national procedure of regularisation. Others live illegally in Lebanon, risking detention and expulsion in breach of the non refoulement principle. They work in the informal market and pay high prices for rent and for medical care without being able to access real estate.
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
31 Report

Increasing HIV Testing Among African Immigrants in Ireland: Challenges and Opportunities

Authors Adebola A. Adedimeji, Ethan Cowan, Aba Asibon, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
35 Journal Article

Demographic and clinical characteristics of refugees seeking primary healthcare services in Greece in the period 2015–2016: a descriptive study

Authors E Kakalou, E Riza, M Chalikias, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name International Health
Citations (WoS) 2
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
37 Journal Article

Access of refugees and displaced persons to socio-economic rights in the Russian Federation

Authors Vadim VOINICOV
Description
Based on analysis of the valid Russian legislation regulating the status of refugees and displaced persons, one can make a conclusion that guarantees of their socio-economic status correspond to generally recognized norms of international law and the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees. Russian legislation stems from the fact that access to socio-economic rights of a refugee is defined by his/her status of a foreign citizen or stateless person. Therefore, in most cases access to the indicated rights is carried out in accordance with the regime established for foreign citizens. However, in some cases (right to retirement benefits, right to social security, right to medical services) a refugee is given additional rights analogous to rights of Russian citizens. This approach to identification of socio-economic status of refugees corresponds to the requirements of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees.
Year 2013
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
38 Report

Konfliktverstehen und -management im Ehrenamt der Flüchtlingshilfe

Principal investigator Andreas Zick (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Dieses Forschungsprojekt identifiziert und analysiert wiederkehrende Konflikte in und um Asylunterkünfte, von denen ehrenamtliche Mitarbeiter*innen direkt oder indirekt betroffen sind. Erkenntnisse über den Ablauf und die Regulierung solcher Konflikte sind bisher kaum systematisch untersucht worden. Darüber hinaus finden Theorien zum Prozess der Konfliktentstehung, -eskalation, -reduktion wie auch Prävention und Interventionsmöglichkeiten selten Eingang in den Alltag der Ehrenamtlichen. Eine Expertise über die Konflikte soll so aufbereitet werden, dass der Transferprozess vom Wissen zur Praxis enger und zuverlässiger gestaltet werden kann, da Konflikte eine wesentliche Barriere für das ehrenamtliche und zivilgesellschaftliche Engagement darstellen. Zielsetzung ist deshalb die Bereitstellung einer Handreichung für Ehrenamtliche, die Wissen und Handlungsanleitungen für ein verbessertes Konfliktmanagement sowie Möglichkeiten zur Konfliktprävention und -intervention zur Verfügung stellt. Das Forschungsprojekt bedient sich Methoden der qualitativen Sozialforschung. Dabei werden ehrenamtlich Tätige an unterschiedlichen Standorten in ganz Deutschland mittels problemzentrierter Interviews befragt. Hierbei stehen das individuelle Konflikterleben sowie die Konfliktbearbeitung im Fokus. Für einen umfassenden Erkenntnisgewinn werden zudem Expert*inneninterviews mit Unterkunftsmanager*innen sowie Sozialarbeiter*innen der Unterkünfte geführt. Im Zentrum des Erkenntnisinteresses stehen die Fragen: Welche Konfliktarten treten (wiederkehrend) auf? Welche unterschiedlichen Akteure sind darin involviert? Welche Formen der Behandlung von Konflikten finden bereits statt?"
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
39 Project

Transnational medical travel: patient mobility, shifting health system entitlements and attachments

Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
41 Journal Article

Interaktion zwischen Gesundheit und Integration Geflüchteter in Deutschland aus einer längsschnittlichen Perspektive

Principal investigator Hannes Kröger (Principal Investigator ), Jürgen Schuppe (Principal Investigator )
Description
Auf Grundlage der IAB-BAMF-SOEP-Stichprobe Geflüchteter wird im Projekt „Longitudinal Aspects of the Interaction between Health and Integration of Refugees in Germany (LARGE)“ ein Indikatorenset zur physischen und mentalen Gesundheit Geflüchteter entwickelt. Darüber hinaus untersuchen die Forschenden, welche Rolle diese Indikatoren im Laufe der Zeit für die Integration der Geflüchteten in die deutsche Gesellschaft spielen. Dabei nutzen sie neben längsschnittlichen auch quasi-experimentelle Analysemethoden. LARGE ist ein Teilprojekt der DFG-Forschungsgruppe „Fluchtmigration nach Deutschland: ein „Vergrößerungsglas“ für umfassendere Herausforderungen im Bereich Public Health“ (PH-LENS).
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
42 Project

The European Refugee Crisis and Humanitarian Citizenship in Greece

Authors Heath Cabot
Year 2019
Journal Name Ethnos
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
43 Journal Article

TRAINING INTERNATIONAL REFUGEE RELIEF HEALTH-WORKERS

Authors B FELDSTEIN, G FRELICK, E FRYE
Year 1983
Journal Name DISASTERS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
45 Journal Article

Reproductive health services for refugees by refugees: an example from Guinea

Authors Anna von Roenne, Egbert Sondorp, Matthias Borchert, ...
Year 2010
Journal Name DISASTERS
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
46 Journal Article

Wie Alter den Unterschied macht: Klassifikationspraktiken, Zugehörigkeit und politische Subjektivität bei jungen Geflüchteten in Deutschland

Principal investigator Katharina Schramm (Principal Investigator)
Description
Was konstituiert und kennzeichnet Minder- und Volljährigkeit bei Geflüchteten? Wie macht das Alter bei ihnen einen (aufenthalts-)rechtlichen, politischen und affektiven Unterschied? Diesen beiden Hauptfragen gehen wir in unserem Projekt nach. Es gibt immer wieder heftige öffentliche Debatten zum Alter von Flüchtlingen und zu rechtsmedizinischen Altersschätzungspraktiken, bei denen u.a. Röntgenaufnahmen von Schlüsselbeinen herangezogen und die Genitalien der Jugendlichen inspiziert werden. Denn unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge haben andere Rechte als erwachsene Geflüchtete: sie haben Anspruch auf einen Platz in einer Jugendwohnung, einen Sprachkurs und schulische Ausbildung. Zugleich müssen sie den Vorgaben pädagogischer Betreuung und denen von Vormündern folgen. Vor allem haben sie andere Möglichkeiten, ihr Bleiben in Deutschland zu organisieren. So ist es beinahe unmöglich, sie abzuschieben. Im Zentrum unserer Untersuchung stehen folgende Dimensionen:1) Klassifikationsprozesse, d.h. die Hervorbringung und Ausprägung der Differenzkategorie Alter in Praktiken der Altersfestsetzung; 2) die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Klassifikationen, d.h. altersspezifische Zugehörigkeiten, Rechte, Möglichkeiten und Einschränkungen von jungen Flüchtlingen mit dem Status "unbegleitete Minderjährige". Zur Umsetzung unserer Forschungsfragen ist eine ethnographische Langzeitstudie vorgesehen. Darin führen wir an allen wichtigen Stationen des Ankommens von jungen Geflüchteten teilnehmende Beobachtungen durch und interviewen die zentralen Akteure der verschiedenen Verfahren. Hierzu zählen die Erstaufnahme ebenso wie jugendamtliche, pädagogische und rechtsmedizinische Praktiken der Altersschätzung sowie daran geknüpfte Widerspruchsprozesse. Schließlich sollen auch Asylanhörungen beim Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge in den Blick genommen werden.Grundlegend für die oben aufgeführten Untersuchungsdimensionen ist unser Verständnis der Differenzkategorie Alter als kontingent, situativ und abhängig von spezifischen Praktiken der Hervorbringung. So können wir erforschen, welche Elemente in medizinischen, pädagogischen und bürokratischen Praxen (ir)relevant und entscheidend werden, wenn es um die Frage geht: ist ein Flüchtling minderjährig? Die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Klassifikation untersuchen wir mit unserem Konzept von politischer Subjektivität, was sowohl Rechte und Handlungsspielräume als auch affektive Zugehörigkeit zusammen denk- und untersuchbar macht.Durch diese erste ethnographische Analyse der Hervorbringung und Wirkmächtigkeit von Alter im Migrationszusammenhang entwickelt das Projekt neue Ansatzpunkte für eine kritische Intervention in den dominanten öffentlichen Diskurs zur Altersschätzung bei jungen Flüchtlingen. Unser Projekt leistet einen theoretischen und empirischen Beitrag an der Schnittstelle von Medizinanthropologie, Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung (STS), Studien zu Flucht und Migration und der Kindheits- und Jugendforschung.
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
49 Project

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors

Authors Julia Huemer, Niranjan S Karnik, Sabine Voelkl-Kernstock, ...
Year 2009
Journal Name Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
50 Journal Article

Assessing refugee healthcare needs in Europe and implementing educational interventions in primary care: a focus on methods

Authors Christos Lionis, Elena Petelos, Enkeleint-Aggelos Mechili, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name BMC International Health and Human Rights
Citations (WoS) 5
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
51 Journal Article

Unaccompanied refugee children - vulnerability and agency

Authors Ketil Eide, Anders Hjern
Year 2013
Journal Name ACTA PAEDIATRICA
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
52 Journal Article

Stuck Between Mainstreaming and Localism: Views on the Practice of Migrant Integration in a Devolved Policy Framework

Authors Silvia Galandini, Silvia Galandini, Gareth Mulvey, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
55 Journal Article

Access to Health Care: The Experiences of Refugee and Refugee Claimant Women in Hamilton, Ontario

Authors K. Bruce Newbold, Jenny Cho, Marie McKeary
Year 2013
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
56 Journal Article

Violence, Flight and Socio-Economic Behavior: A Field Study Among Syrian Refugees in Three Asylum Countries

Principal investigator Stefan Voigt (Principal Investigator ), Mazen Hassan (Principal Investigator ), Andreas Nicklisch (Principal Investigator )
Description
Flucht kann eine einschneidende traumatische Erfahrung sein, die einen Einfluss auf Individuen, Familien und die Gesellschaft hat. In vielen Fällen beinhaltet sie traumatische Belastungen wie etwa das Erfahren einer akuten Bedrohungssituation, die Entscheidung zu fliehen, Trennung von der eigenen Familie, das Durchleben extremer Gefahrensituationen und der Flucht, das Erreichen von Aufnahmelagern mit weiteren Unsicherheiten, Angst vor der Rückführung und vor allem Ansiedlung oder Umsiedlung. Sozialpsychologische Studien haben gezeigt, dass diese Schocks - wenn sie auch teils kurzfristige Erfahrungen widerspiegeln - langfristige Auswirkungen auf die Ansichten eines Menschen und seine Präferenzen haben. Unter den elf Millionen Syrern, die bis heute ihre Heimat verlassen haben, sind etwa vier Millionen, die sich für eine Flucht in andere Länder entschieden haben. Dieses Ereignis verursacht nicht nur humanitäre Herausforderungen für die Flüchtlinge selbst, sondern auch soziale und politische Herausforderungen für diejenigen Länder, in die sie fliehen. Ziel des Projekts ist es, mit Hilfe verhaltensökonomischer Methoden die Auswirkungen dieses speziellen Traumas auf verschiedene sozio-ökonomisch relevante Werte (z.B. Hilfsbereitschaft, Vertrauen, Risikobereitschaft, Reziprozität oder Ehrlichkeit) der syrischen Flüchtlinge zu testen. So soll neues Wissen über den Zusammenhang zwischen traumatischen Erfahrungen und Wertesystemen verbessert und auch die Kenntnis über Wirkungen verschiedener Flüchtlingspolitiken erhöht werden.
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
57 Project

The Mental Health of Refugee Children and Their Cultural Development

Authors Maurice Eisenbruch
Year 1988
Journal Name International Migration Review
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
59 Journal Article

Turkey Refugee Resilience

Authors UNDP, Bastien Revel, Atlantic Council
Description
Since 2014, Turkey has not only hosted the world’s largest refugee population but has also modeled a best practice for the global refugee policy discussion. Turkey’s opening of its health, education, employment, and social services systems to Syrians under Temporary Protection (SuTP) sits at the basis of this successful response. At the start of 2019/2020 school year, 684,253 Syrian children under temporary protection were enrolled in the Turkish schools, while a network of 179 Migrant Health Centers is currently operating in thirty provinces across Turkey. Turkey has been the main funding source of this impressive response, incurring a total cost of more than $40 billion according to official data. In line with the principle of burden-sharing, which is highlighted in the Global Compact on Refugees, the international community has also made resources available to support Turkey in this unprecedented effort; over $4 billion has been mobilized through the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan for Turkey (3RP) since 2015. Within this framework, Turkey’s experience on the key issues such as jobs and employment should be examined as lessons for both refugee hosting countries and donor countries alike. The country has provided Syrians under Temporary Protection the right to access work permits and formal employment. As a result, a total of 132,497 work permits have been issued to Syrian nationals between 2016 and 2019. This is why the United Nations Development Programme in Turkey (UNDP Turkey), as a long standing development partners in Turkey and the coleader of the Refugee and Resilience Response Plan (3RP), and the Atlantic Council IN TURKEY, the Turkey program of the Atlantic Council, a leading Washington-based think tank, have partnered for this research. The Atlantic Council launched its Turkey program in 2018, which grew out of its engagement with Turkey over ten years and is increasingly involved in migration and refugee issues, to contribute to the ongoing policy debate. Building on the experience and expertise of both organizations, our joint policy report, which is to be released after the June 30 Brussels Conference, aims at outlining pragmatic and innovative options at policy and programmatic levels to facilitate refugees’ access to decent employment. Self-reliance and access to formal employment Facilitating self-reliance for such a large number of refugees’ households remains a daunting task, even in the medium to long-term. This is especially the case in a context where increasing levels of unemployment in Turkey compounded by the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic have posed a serious challenge to job creation and increased competition for available opportunities. Despite a concerted effort and strong leadership , there have been challenges for refugees to achieve self-reliance, best highlighted by a recent assessment that 1.6 million refugees live below the poverty line. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the vulnerability associated with informal work and casual labor, with many refugees and host communities facing a sudden and unexpected loss of income. The internationally supported cash response to directly assist the most vulnerable (the Emergency Social Safety Net—ESSN—and the Conditional Cash Transfer for Education—CCTE) has been crucial in allowing refugees to meet their basic needs over the past couple of years. However, given the overall cost of such programs in the long-term, access to income and formal employment remains a key challenge. The Exit Strategy from the ESSN program released by the government in December 2018 marks a step towards a conducive policy framework to facilitate refugees’ access to formal employment. Policy options The main findings of the joint report highlight that: 1. The main challenge remains in matching refugees to the labor market by raising enhancing their skills. While international partners have contributed to this end over the past years, it hasn’t been enough for refugees to become employable options for many large Turkish companies—many of the most skilled Syrians fled to Europe. 2. Businesses’ support programs need to go beyond job placement of refugees in small businesses in exchange for business development support and grants. More integrated structural investments at the local level are needed, particularly, in industrial, manufacturing, and agricultural value chains. 3. While the presence of refugees can be seen as an asset to catalyze local development, host communities need to be supported equitably as well. 4. The current priority towards the formalization of existing jobs is paramount to ensuring decent work conditions for refugees, appropriate access to income, and fair competition between job seekers. The recent inspections to raise awareness of employers on employment regulations for Syrian workers have yielded important results in Istanbul, significantly increasing work permit applications by employers. This could be applied elsewhere. Private sector engagement and digital solutions Based on other international experiences, we also identified deepening engagement with the private sector and exploring digital livelihoods opportunities as emerging solutions to this issue. These two solutions are particularly tailored to the challenges of the situation in Turkey, as they can create opportunities for both Turkish companies and individual Syrians, alleviating pressure on the labor market. Digital solutions (such as digital entrepreneurship, e-commerce, or language and translation businesses) are particularly promising as they create new, sustainable job creation dynamics that have the potential to expand both within Turkey to benefit most vulnerable refugees and internationally by accessing new markets. Given the scale of the task at hand, every possible contribution should be maximized to further unleash the resilience and potential demonstrated by Syrian refugees and their host communities. The COVID-19 pandemic is proving to be an important test on the government’s and their international partners’ relevance and flexibility and their ability to quickly step up efforts in that direction. Pursuing these solutions and policy options would help further promote the refugee response in Turkey as a best practice in implementing the key principles of the Global Compact for Refugees.
Year 2020
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
61 Report

Study on health care for undocumented migrants in Switzerland

Description
The study is implemented parallel to the EU-wide project "Health Care in Nowhereland-Improving Services for Undocumented Migrants in the EU" (funded by DG SANCO and coordinated by the Danube University Krems), which analyses the regulatory frameworks, health care practices and migrant strategies in 27 EU countries. The results of the Swiss study will be integrated into the EU project. Objectives • To situate the Swiss case in the wider European context • To work out the main similarities and differences between the respective national health care systems and practices at the intersection of welfare and irregular migration Outcomes • Analysis of the national regulatory and financial framework to which the respective health care institutions dealing with “undocumented” migrants are bound to act • Collection of data on different practices of administrations and health care institutions providing health care to "undocumented" migrants • Identification of transferable best practice models • Overview of the various health problems “undocumented” migrants show and how these migrants manoeuvre in order to get the medical assistance needed
Year 2008
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
62 Project

Beiträge der Zivilgesellschaft zur Bewältigung der Flüchtlingskrise – Leistungen und Lernchancen

Authors Ruth Simsa, Maian Auf, Sara-Maria Bratke, ...
Description
„Gäbe es die Zivilgesellschaft nicht, wäre das gesamte Asylsystem mittlerweile zusammengebrochen“ (I 17, Führungskraft, Nov.15). Die Flüchtlingskrise hat gezeigt, dass die Zivilgesellschaft eine wichtige Rolle bei der Bewältigung von Herausforderungen der Immigration und Integration spielt. Im Herbst und Winter 2015 wäre es ohne zivilgesellschaftliches Engagement in Österreich zu einer humanitären Katastrophe gekommen. Die Zivilgesellschaft hat in dieser Zeit besonders hohe Beiträge geleistet, sei es in der Erstversorgung, in der Organisation von Flüchtlingsunterkünften, in Integrationsmaßnahmen und in der Mobilisierung und Koordination freiwilliger Hilfe. Zudem haben zivilgesellschaftliche AkteurInnen auch die öffentliche Meinung mitgeprägt und die Vernetzung von Freiwilligen befördert. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass Integration ohne weitere Beiträge der Zivilgesellschaft und ihrer Organisationen auch in Zukunft nicht möglich sein wird. In dem vorliegenden Projekt wurde daher folgenden Fragen nachgegangen:  Was hat die Zivilgesellschaft im Herbst 2015 zur Bewältigung der sogenannten Flüchtlingskrise geleistet und wie wurde dies erreicht?  Wie wurde die Arbeit der Zivilgesellschaft von syrischen Flüchtlingen wahrgenommen?  Was kann daraus für die Bewältigung weiterer Herausforderungen der Immigration und Integration gelernt werden? Alle genannten Probleme bzw. Lernchancen müssen vor dem Hintergrund der Ausnahmeund Krisensituation sowie der hohen Leistungen der Zivilgesellschaft betrachtet werden. Eine große Herausforderung für die Organisationen waren Informationsdefizite und sich laufend ändernde Rahmenbedingungen. Auch die gesellschaftliche Polarisierung, Rechtsunsicherheiten bzw. die Nichteinhaltung von Gesetzen durch politische Instanzen und Defizite der wohlfahrtsstaatlichen Aufgabenübernahme waren belastend. Zum Teil hat die Zivilgesellschaft Aufgaben des Staates übernommen. Wo im Auftrag der öffentlichen Hand gearbeitet wurde, gab es häufig mangelnde finanzielle Planungssicherheit und späte Zahlungen für geleistete Arbeit. Die Situation der AsylwerberInnen war aufgrund der mangelnden politischen Abstimmung bzw. Bereitschaft zusätzlich belastet. Das Spektrum der angebotenen Leistungen war extrem breit, neben der Erstversorgung und Akuthilfe umfasst es die Organisation von Wohnraum, Weiterbildungen oder Freizeitgestaltung, Kinderbetreuung, Übersetzungsarbeit, Rechtsberatung, Unterstützung bei Behördenwegen, gesundheitliche Versorgung und vieles mehr. Die Bereitschaft zu freiwilligem Engagement nahm im Herbst 2015 ein Hierzulande nie dagewesenes Ausmaß an. Freiwillige haben sich in nahezu allen Bereichen der Flüchtlingsarbeit engagiert. Viele Freiwillige wurden selbstorganisiert und spontan tätig, ein Großteil allerdings half im Rahmen bestehender NPOs oder neugegründeter Vereine. Für die zivilgesellschaftlichen Organisationen war die Mitarbeit dieser vielen Menschen absolut notwendig, um das hohe Leistungsniveau anzubieten. Mit viel Einsatz und Empathie wurde nicht nur ein hohes Maß an Hilfe geleistet, sondern damit auch ein politisches Statement für Menschlichkeit und Toleranz gesetzt. Das Management der vielen HelferInnen war unter den gegebenen dynamischen Rahmenbedingungen allerdings auch eine Herausforderung. So war eine vorausschauende Bedarfsplanung aufgrund externer Faktoren, wie der Öffnung bzw. Schließung von Grenzen oder der Bereitstellung von Unterkünften und Transportmöglichkeiten kaum möglich. Insgesamt betrachtet haben es die NPOs geschafft, sehr flexibel auf Anforderungen zu reagieren. 2 Die Mobilisierung und Gewinnung von HelferInnen hat über alle Organisationen hinweg größtenteils gut, schnell und unbürokratisch funktioniert, u.a. mittels intensiver und effektiver Nutzung von Social-Media. So konnten die Leistungen der Freiwilligen trotz eines Rückgangs der Engagementbereitschaft im Laufe des Winters aufrecht erhalten bleiben. Aufgrund des hohen und schwer planbaren Bedarfs wurden breite, unspezifische Maßnahmen zur Gewinnung von Freiwilligen gesetzt. Dadurch konnten ausreichend HelferInnen mobilisiert werden, vielfach kam es aber auch zu einem temporären Überangebot an Freiwilligen. In der akuten Phase gab es oft nur eingeschränkte Möglichkeiten zur Selektion von Freiwilligen, es waren kaum Auswahlverfahren möglich und auch die Möglichkeiten zur Orientierung und Einschulung der HelferInnen waren begrenzt und es kam mitunter zu einem Mis-match zwischen Tätigkeiten und Ansprüchen der HelferInnen. Zu Beginn der Akutphase im September fehlten oft klare Kompetenzaufteilungen zwischen Haupt- und Ehrenamtlichen. Andererseits entstanden daraus große Spielräume für die Freiwilligen, die sich vielfach selbst organisierten, Strukturen aufbauten und sich in einem Mix aus Erfahrenem und Neuem selbst einschulten, koordinierten und in ihrer Arbeit ergänzten. Häufig waren diese Spielräume auch der Ausgangspunkt für die Gründung neuer Initiativen. Die Übertragung von Verantwortung an die Freiwilligen hat v.a. dann gut funktioniert, wenn Organisationen klare Ziele und Ansprechpersonen definierten. Weiters wichtig waren Information, Feedback-Kanäle und die Einbindung der Freiwilligen in die Gestaltung der Tätigkeit. War dies nicht gegeben, kam es zu Überforderung, Frustrationen oder auch Konflikten mit bestehenden oder neu eingeführten Ablauf- und Entscheidungsstrukturen. Eine weitere Herausforderung stellte die hohe Fluktuation sowohl unter Freiwilligen als auch z.T. unter den hauptamtlichen KoordinatorInnen dar. Diese erschwerte die Etablierung von strukturierten Kommunikationskanälen und die Informationsweitergabe und führte zu Ineffizienzen in der Ablauforganisation und Ärger bei manchen Freiwilligen. Dies betraf eher etablierte NPOs. Basisinitiativen, die ihre Strukturen um aktuelle Ziele formten, konnten teilweise sehr rasch funktionale Kommunikationskanäle aufbauen. Sowohl Freiwillige als auch Hauptamtliche waren oft mit enormen Belastungen konfrontiert. Maßnahmen gegen Überlastung und Supervisionsangebote und sonstige Formen der Unterstützung waren daher für alle MitarbeiterInnen wichtig. Sie wurden sehr geschätzt, und hätten früher und stärker angeboten werden können. Neben der Tätigkeit selbst trugen auch Anerkennung in (sozialen) Medien der Organisationen und in den Teams zur Motivation bei. Es gab große Unterschiede in der Struktur und Kultur der beteiligten Organisationen. Hier ist ein Kontinuum beobachtbar, entlang der Differenz Hierarchie/Struktur versus Flexibilität/Offenheit. Die eher hierarchisch organisierten Einsatzorganisationen konnten schnelle Entscheidungen treffen, rasch mit ähnlichen Organisationen kooperieren und sie konnten auf die für Katastrophenfälle vorbereiteten Strukturen zurückgreifen. Selbst etablierte Hilfsorganisationen mussten diese erst durch learning by doing aufbauen. Neu gegründete Basisinitiativen wiederum hatten den Vorteil von Flexibilität und Offenheit für spontane Entscheidungen. Für manche Freiwilligen waren diese Strukturen motivierend, andere fühlten sich in klareren Strukturen wohler. In fast allen Organisationen wurde aber von strukturellen Änderungen berichtet, so waren Einsatzorganisationen mit der Notwendigkeit flexiblerer Bereiche konfrontiert, Basisinitiativen machten häufig eine vergleichsweise rasche Entwicklung zu stärkeren Strukturen durch. Die Organisationen haben generell Herausforderungen des sehr raschen Größenwachstums und der Notwendigkeit organisationaler Flexibilität überraschend gut bewältigt. Es wurde Mehrarbeit bewältigt, rasch neues Personal eingestellt und eingesetzt, Regeln bewusst zeitweise außer Kraft gesetzt, aber gleichzeitig notwendige Strukturen bewahrt. Fast alle Organisationen berichten von deutlichen Lernschritten. 3 Kooperationen innerhalb der Zivilgesellschaft funktionierten grundsätzlich gut, in der Regel umso besser, je ähnlicher die PartnerInnen einander waren. Die Kooperationen zwischen strukturell unterschiedlichen AkteurInnen war zum Teil schwieriger, hier gab es unterschiedliche Standards in Bezug auf Verlässlichkeit, Reaktionsgeschwindigkeit, Spielraum für Einzelpersonen etc. Zur Kooperation mit der öffentlichen Hand gab es unterschiedliche Aussagen, z.T. wurde diese als erfolgreich beschrieben, z.T. aber auch kritisiert, v.a. die Nicht-Wahrnehmung von Aufgaben seitens der öffentlichen Hand betreffend. Die Einrichtung der Stelle eines Flüchtlingskoordinators durch die Stadt Wien wurde sehr positiv wahrgenommen, sie unterstützte die Bündelung des Hilfsangebots, v.a. durch die zentrale Informationsstelle. Wenngleich die Arbeit von vielen als sehr befriedigend wahrgenommen wurde, so war sie auch extrem belastend. Zum einen waren viele Hauptamtliche wie Freiwillige zu lange im „Notfallmodus“, sie arbeiteten am Limit. Es gab Freiwillige, die für den Einsatz ihren Job gekündigt oder ihr Studium aufgegeben hatten, Engagement im Ausmaß von 15h oder mehr pro Tag war keine Seltenheit. Auch seelische Belastungen wurden von fast allen wahrgenommen, deutlich mehr allerdings von Personen, die für diese Art von Tätigkeit nicht ausgebildet waren. Die befragten syrischen Flüchtlinge schätzen die vergleichsweise gute Behandlung in Österreich, die Leistungen der Zivilgesellschaft und die soziale Absicherung – sofern sie bereits in deren Genuss kommen. Gleichzeitig berichten alle von erheblichen Problemen, v.a. in Bezug auf lange und ungewisse Verfahren, die Situation und Versorgungslage in Notquartieren, Deutschkurse, Schwierigkeiten bei der Wohnungs- und Arbeitssuche nach Erhalt des Asylbescheides. Manche sind auch enttäuscht, da sie höhere Erwartungen an Österreich hatten, nicht zuletzt aufgrund falscher Versprechungen durch SchlepperInnen. Generell war das Anwachsen zivilgesellschaftlichen Engagements positiv für das Image der Zivilgesellschaft und der NPOs, für das Selbstbild und die persönliche Weiterentwicklung vieler Beteiligter, für Kontakte zwischen Einheimischen und Asylsuchenden und natürlich auch für die Aufrechterhaltung der Versorgung. Gesellschaftspolitisch ist es dennoch kritisch zu beurteilen, dass quantitative und qualitative Standards dem Wollen und Können privater AkteurInnen überlassen wurden. Verantwortungsbewusste Menschen haben somit auf eigene (zeitliche und materielle) Kosten die Lücke geschlossen, die der Staat gelassen hatte. Eine professionelle und mit Ressourcen abgesicherte Grundversorgung durch die öffentliche Hand und NPOs könnte Sicherheit stiften. Der Zivilgesellschaft bliebe Spielraum für Aufgaben der Integration, u.a. der Schaffung eines engmaschigen Netzes von direkten Kontakten zwischen den Zugewanderten und der lokalen Bevölkerung. Hier kann auch eine wichtige Rolle für größere NPOs liegen, nämlich die Unterstützung lokaler, basisorientierter Initiativen, die Integrationsarbeit leisten. „Im Moment (Anm. November 2015) habe ich das Gefühl, ganz Österreich ist Zivilgesellschaft. Der Staat hat sich ganz zurückgezogen, überzeichnet gesagt“ (I 17).
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
63 Report

Eritrean Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in The Netherlands: Wellbeing and Health

Year 2019
Book Title Unaccompanied Children: from migration to integration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
65 Book Chapter

Evaluation of Amigas Latinas Motivando el Alma (ALMA): A Pilot Promotora Intervention Focused on Stress and Coping Among Immigrant Latinas

Authors Anh N. Tran, Georgina Perez, Melissa A. Green, ...
Year 2014
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
66 Journal Article

How Can We Keep Immigrant Travelers Healthy? Health Challenges Experienced by Canadian South Asian Travelers Visiting Friends and Relatives

Authors Rachel D. Savage, Natasha S. Crowcroft, Laura Rosella, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name QUALITATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
67 Journal Article

Making a New Home in Germany: How do Newly Arrived Arabic Refugee Youth Acculturate to Life in Germany?

Principal investigator Patricia Kanngießer (Principal Investigator)
Description
Nach neusten Schätzungen sind im Jahr 2015 mehr als 21 Millionen Menschen weltweit vor Krieg, Konflikten und Verfolgung geflohen - davon waren mehr als die Hälfte Kinder und Jugendliche. Geflüchtete Jugendliche fliehen oft unter schwierigsten Umständen und sind bei Ihrer Ankunft im Aufnahmeland mit der Aufgabe konfrontiert, sich ein neues Zuhause aufzubauen. Wie reagieren geflüchtete Jugendliche auf diese Herausforderungen und wie erleben sie den Anpassungsprozess an ihre neue soziokulturelle Umgebung (Akkulturation)? Das Projekt macht es sich zur zentralen Aufgabe, Akkulturation bei geflüchteten, arabischsprachigen Jugendlichen zu untersuchen, die die größte Gruppe der Neuankömmlinge darstellt. Dabei wird unter anderem folgenden Fragen nachgegangen werden: Was sind die größten Herausforderungen, mit denen sich neuangekommene geflüchtete Jugendliche konfrontiert sehen? Wie wirken sich psychische Gesundheit und allgemeines Wohlbefinden auf die kulturelle Anpassungsprozesse aus? Welche Rolle spielen dabei Familien- und Freundesnetzwerke? Wie sind Sozialverhalten und Vertrauen von der Fluchterfahrung geprägt? Welche Wünsche und Hoffnungen haben geflüchtete Jugendliche für die Zukunft? Das Projekt soll neue Erkenntnisse liefern, wie sich neu angekommene, geflüchtete Jugendliche in Deutschland ein neues Zuhause aufbauen, und könnte darüber hinaus auch eine Grundlage zur Entwicklung von gezielten Interventions- und Akkulturationsprogrammen bilden.
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
68 Project

Flüchtlingslager. Geschichte einer humanitären Technologie

Principal investigator Joël Glasman (Principal Investigator)
Description
Humanitäre Nothilfe in Flüchtlingslagern ist in Afrika keine Ausnahmesituation. Seit einem halben Jahrhundert prägen Flüchtlingslager die Geschichte des Kontinents. Von der Entstehung des UNO Flüchtlingswerks (UNCHR, 1951) bis zu den heutigen Flüchtlingswellen aus der Zentralafrikanischen Republik nach Kamerun (2014) haben sich Flüchtlingslager als das dominante standardisierte Instrument für die Versorgung und Unterbringung von Flüchtlingen durchgesetzt. Anthropologen, Soziologen, Politologen und Geographen haben bereits wichtige Studien zu Flüchtlingslagern vorgelegt, historische Untersuchungen sind jedoch bisher ein Forschungsdesiderat. Das hier vorgestellte Projekt untersucht Flüchtlingslager als technisches Dispositiv der globalisierten humanitären Hilfe. Es analysiert wie seit der Gründung des UNHCR im Jahre 1951 ein Ensemble von physischen Artefakten (Zelte, Kits, Gegenständen), wissenschaftlichen Komponenten (Handbücher, Verfahren, Statistiken), Normen (Regeln, rechtlichen Kategorien) und Experten (Ingenieure, Ärzte, Stadtplaner, Architekten) entstanden ist. Das Projekt analysiert zunächst die Kontroversen um die Planung von Flüchtlingslagern, zweitens die Standardisierung von Verfahren, und drittens die kreative Anpassung der Lagertechniken durch die Hilfsempfänger. Empirisch konzentriert sich das Vorhaben auf drei Aspekte der Lagertechnologien: a) das Screening von Flüchtlingen, die durch die Auswertung der technical mission reports im Archiv von UNHCR in Genf Archiven analysiert wird; b) die Konzeption und Planung von Modelllagern, deren Entstehung in der Grauliteratur und Handbüchern des UNHCR nachgegangen wird und c) die Frage der Zuteilung der Hilfe, die durch Feldforschung und Experteninterviews in den Flüchtlingslagern um Meiganga (Nordosten von Kamerun) herausgearbeitet werden soll. Dieses Projekt kann als historische Analyse einen wichtigen Beitrag zum Schwerpunktprogramm leisten, indem es das Flüchtlingslager als Technik der humanitären Ordnung untersucht. Flüchtlingslager verknüpfen verschiedene Bereiche (Gesundheit, soziale Kategorisierung, juristische Normen, Sicherheitsfragen) und vernetzen verschiedene Akteure und Interessen (Experten, NGO Angestellte, Flüchtlinge, lokale Bevölkerung, usw.). Sie sind daher in ein gutes Beispiel, um die Artikulation von Visionen globaler Ordnungen und lokale Ordnungskonstellationen zu studieren.
Year 2015
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
69 Project

The refugee crisis in Greece

Authors Nikolaos Gkionakis
Year 2016
Journal Name Intervention: Journal of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Conflict Affected Areas
Citations (WoS) 7
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
71 Journal Article

Irregular Migration into and through Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Countries: Legal Perspectives

Authors Ryszard CHOLEWINSKI, Kristina TOUZENIS
Description
This synthesis report aims to provide an overview of the national legal frameworks of 11 Southern and Eastern Mediterranean countries addressing irregular migration taking place to and from their territories. The countries under examination are Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, and Turkey. The unique position in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT) is also analyzed. The irregular migration flows into and out of these countries are complex. Most of the countries in question are, to a certain degree, countries of origin, transit and destination. In some instances, irregular migration flows are intertwined with refugee movements, especially from Iraq and sub-Saharan Africa. The legal status of asylum seekers and refugees is far from transparent in a number of these countries and consequently they are often considered to be in an irregular situation. Their status is also bound up with the presence of a large number of Palestinian and Iraqi refugees, especially in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. The residence status of Palestinians in the OPT is also unstable. It is worthy to underline that a number of countries in the region have relatively complex and restrictive provisions regarding the access of foreign nationals to the labour market, with the result that migrants are at greater risk of irregularity. Ce rapport de synthèse offre un aperçu des cadres législatifs nationaux pertinents en matière de migration irrégulière en vigueur dans 11 pays du Sud et de l’Est de la Méditerranée. Les pays analysés sont l’Algérie, l’Egypte, Israël, la Jordanie, le Liban, la Libye, la Mauritanie, le Maroc, la Syrie, la Tunisie et la Turquie.1 1 Il faut noter qu’aucun rapport national n’a été transmis pour l’Algérie et la Libye. La situation très spécifique des Territoires occupés palestiniens est également envisagée. Les flux migratoires au départ et à travers cette région sont complexes. La plupart de ces pays sont, à des degrés divers, à la fois des pays d’origine, de transit et de destination. Dans certains cas, les flux de migrations irrégulières sont mixtes, c'est-à-dire également composés de mouvements de réfugiés, principalement en provenance d’Irak et d’Afrique sub-saharienne. Dans les divers pays d’accueil, le statut légal de ces réfugiés est loin d’être transparent de telle sorte qu’ils sont souvent considérés comme des migrants en situation irrégulière. Leur situation est également influencée par la présence numériquement importante de réfugiés palestiniens et irakiens, principalement en Egypte, en Jordanie, au Liban et en Syrie. Le titre de séjour des Palestiniens dans les Territoires occupés est également précaire. Il faut par ailleurs souligner que la complexité et la sévérité des législations relatives à l’accès au marché du travail d’un certain nombre de pays couverts par le rapport concourent à l’accroissement des situations d’irrégularité.
Year 2009
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
72 Report

Returning Rejected Asylum Seekers: Challenges and good practices – Luxembourg

Authors Linda Dionisio, Noemi Marcus, Adolfo Sommarribas, ...
Description
The issue of non-return of rejected international protection applicants does not enjoy a high political profile on its own, but has been discussed as part of a global debate on asylum. Significant efforts are required when considering the wide spectrum of possible reasons of non-return, some reasons depending on the countries of destination, others on the returnee himself/herself. In this respect, reasons of non return range from the non-respect of deadlines, the issuance of travel documents, postponement of removal for external reasons to the returnee, for medical reasons, the resistance of the third-country national and the lack of diplomatic representation of Luxembourg, to name but a few. In regards to the procedure, in Luxembourg the rejection of the international protection application includes the return decision. The Minister in charge of Immigration, through the Directorate of Immigration, issues this decision. The return decision only becomes enforceable when all appeals are exhausted and the final negative decision of rejection of the competent judicial authority enters into force, as appeals have suspensive effects. This decision also sets out the timeframe during which the rejected international protection applicant has to leave the country. In case the applicant does not opt for a voluntary return, the decision will also include the country to which s/he will be sent. In general, the decision provides for a period of 30 days during which the applicant has the option to leave voluntarily and to benefit from financial support in case of assisted voluntary return through the International Organization for Migration (IOM). There are two exceptions to this rule: the applicant who is considered a threat to national security, public safety or homeland security and the applicant who has already been issued a return decision before. The declaration and documentation provided during the procedure of international protection can be used to facilitate return. Subsequent applications are possible, in particular if new evidence of facts appears resulting in an increased likelihood of the applicant to qualify for international protection. For rejected international protection applicants who did not opt for voluntary return and did not receive any postponement of removals, a certain (limited) support is available while waiting for the execution of the enforceable return decision. As such, they continue to stay in reception facilities and to receive certain social benefits unless they transgress any internal rules. If an urgent need exists, rejected applicants may be granted a humanitarian social aid. However, they are not entitled to access the labour market or to receive ‘pocket money’ or the free use of transport facilities. They benefit from an access to education and training, however this access cannot constitute a possible reason for non-return. These benefits are available to rejected applicants until the moment of their removal. In order to enforce the return decision and prevent absconding, the Minister may place the rejected international applicant in the detention centre, especially if s/he is deemed to be obstructing their own return. Other possible measures include house arrest, regular reporting surrendering her/his passport or depositing a financial guarantee of 5000€. Most of these alternatives to detention were introduced with the Law of 18 December 2015 which entered into force on 1st January 2016. As a consequence, detention remains the main measure used to enforce return decisions. A number of challenges to return and measures to curb them are detailed in this study. A part of these measures have been set up to minimize the resistance to return from the returnee. First and foremost is the advocacy of the AVRR programme and the dissemination of information relating to this programme but also the establishment of a specific return programme to West Balkan countries not subject to visa requirements. Other measures aim at facilitating the execution of forced returns, such as police escorts or the placement in the detention centre. Finally, significant efforts are directed towards increasing bilateral cooperation and a constant commitment to the conclusion of readmission agreements. No special measures were introduced after 2014 in response to the exceptional flows of international protection applicants arriving in the EU. While the Return service within the Directorate of Immigration has continued to expand its participation to European Networks and in various transnational projects in matters of return, this participation was already set into motion prior to the exceptional flows of 2014. As for effective measures curbing challenges to return, this study brings to light the AVRR programme but especially the separate return programme for returnees from West Balkan countries exempt of visa requirements. The dissemination of information on voluntary return is also considered an effective policy measure, the information being made available from the very start of the international protection application. Among the cases where return is not immediately possible, a considerable distinction has to be made in regards to the reasons for the non-return. Indeed, in cases where the delay is due to the medical condition of the returnee or to material and technical reasons that are external to the returnee, a postponement of removal will be granted. This postponement allows for the rejected applicant to remain on the territory on a temporary basis, without being authorized to reside and may be accompanied by a measure of house arrest or other. In cases of postponement for medical reasons and of subsequent renewals bringing the total length of postponement over two years, the rejected applicant may apply for a residence permit for private reasons based on humanitarian grounds of exceptional seriousness. Nevertheless, apart from this exception, no official status is granted to individuals who cannot immediately be returned. Several measures of support are available to beneficiaries of postponement to removal: they have access to accommodation in the reception centres they were housed in during their procedure, they may be attributed humanitarian aid, they continue to be affiliated at the National Health Fund, they continue to have access to education and professional training and they are allowed to work through a temporary work authorization. The temporary work authorization is only valid for a single profession and a single employer for the duration of the postponement to removal, although this is an extremely rare occurrence in practice. OLAI may allocate a humanitarian aid might be allocated if the individual was already assisted by OLAI during the procedure of her/his international protection application. All of these measures apply until the moment of return. The study also puts forth a number of best practices such as the Croix-Rouge’s involvement in police trainings, their offer of punctual support to vulnerable people through international networking or the socio-psychological support given to vulnerable people placed in the detention centre among others. A special regard has to be given to AVRR programmes and their pre-departure information and counselling, the dissemination of information and the post-arrival support and reintegration assistance. Indeed, stakeholders singled the AVRR programme out as a best practice and the Luxembourgish government has made voluntary return a policy priority for a long time. However, this increased interest in voluntary returns has to be put into perspective as research shows that sustainable success of voluntary return and reintegration measures is only achieved for a very restricted number of beneficiaries (namely for young, autonomous and dynamic returnees with sizeable social networks and who were granted substantial social capital upon return). Hence, returning women remains a sensitive issue, especially if they were fleeing abusive relationships. Another factor contributing to hardship set forth by research is the difficult reintegration of returnees that have lived outside of their country of return for a prolonged period of time and are therefore unable to rely on social networks for support or for a sense of belonging. Based on these considerations, NGOs and academia cast doubts on the ‘voluntary’ nature of these return programmes, their criticism targeting the misleading labelling of these policy measures.
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
73 Report

Public health equity in refugee and other displaced persons settings

Authors UNHCR. Public Health and HIV Section, UNHCR. Policy Development and Evaluation Service
Year 2010
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
74 Report

Intimate Partner Violence: How Does it Impact Major Depressive Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Immigrant Latinas?

Authors K. Fedovskiy, S. Higgins, A. Paranjape
Year 2007
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Citations (WoS) 35
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
77 Journal Article

A Capture-Recapture Approach to Estimation of Refugee Populations

Authors Steven J. Gold, Wilma Novales Wibert, Vera Bondartsova, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name International Migration
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
78 Journal Article

Comparing Pregnancy Outcomes of Immigrants from Ethiopia and the Former Soviet Union to Israel, to those of Native-Born Israelis

Authors Shakked Lubotzky-Gete, Ilana Shoham-Vardi, Eyal Sheiner
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
81 Journal Article

Mechanisms Explaining the Relationship Between Maternal Torture Exposure and Youth Adjustment In Resettled Refugees: A Pilot Examination of Generational Trauma Through Moderated Mediation

Authors Sarah J. Hoffman, Maria Vukovich, JE Gaugler, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
82 Journal Article

Pre-deployment Education and Training for Refugee Emergencies: Health and Safety Aspects

Authors J. PEARN
Year 1997
Journal Name Journal of Refugee Studies
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
83 Journal Article

“We are out of balance here”: a Hmong Cultural Model of Diabetes

Authors Kathleen A. Culhane-Pera, Cheng Her, Bee Her
Year 2007
Journal Name Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
92 Journal Article

Urban Refugees: The Experiences of Syrians in Istanbul

Description
In over six years of escalating violence, more than 200,000 Syrians have been killed, and millions more have been forced to flee their homes both within the country and to neighboring states. The repercussions of this ongoing violence have reached Europe, with refugee numbers set to reach 1 million in Germany alone.1 In a desperate bid to stem the flow of people, the EU and Turkey reached a deal in November 2015 to reduce the number of migrants entering Europe from Turkish territory. UNHCR’s Regional Refugee Response estimates that Turkey now hosts 2.1 million registered Syrians refugees.2 This number easily reaches 2.3 million when unregistered Syrians are included. Contrary to the popular image, the majority of Syrians, like other refugee groups, are found outside camps in urban areas. Through interviews with a sample of Turkish NGOs and Syrian people of different religious, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds in Istanbul, this report highlights the daily challenges and insecurity faced by Syrians in urban areas that are not only leading many to leave for Europe but also directly influencing refugees’ choices in how they exit the country. While the Turkish state has spent over 7.6 billion USD on refugees, the overwhelming majority of this goes towards the 25 refugee camps in the country. There is no state support for urban refugees in Turkey outside those near the camps. Inconsistency also exists in the posi-tion, knowledge, and response of the various municipal governments in Istanbul regarding Syrian populations. In consultation with the Istanbul governor’s office and the relevant national agencies, Istanbul’s local munici-palities are responsible for and oversee a number of services in their vicinity from infrastructure and maintenance to health, religious, and water services. Knowledge of the number and needs of the populations in their districts is a necessity for municipal develop-ment in order to plan for emergencies, capacities, and services. In this context, the paradox posed by Syrians in urban areas is that they are a development and legis-lative challenge and not a humanitarian problem. 1T. Porter, “Refugee crisis: Germany has received over 1 million migrants in 2015,” International Business Times, December 10, 2015. Retrieved http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/refugee-crisis-germany-has-received-over-1-mil-lion-migrants-2015-1532674 2Syrian Regional Refugee Response: Inter-agency Information Sharing Portal, United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees, November 2015, accessed November 30, 2015, http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/re-gional.php.All interviewees for this report highlighted a number of problems and issues with living in Turkey. In the case of one family interviewed, these were identified as push factors that eventually led them to travel to Europe. A lack of documentation such as residence or work permits and the accompanying rights entailed exclude Syrians from simple practices such as opening a bank account, ensuring restitution for their work, legally renting, and in many cases paying their utilities. This creates a fundamental insecurity and instability in the lives of Syrians that prevents them from settling in Turkey. Bureaucratic problems in harmonization and commu-nication result in rules and laws being inadequately announced and inconsistently applied from place to place. These problems range from inconsistency in the application of mobility restrictions on Syrians to knowledge of their rights. Despite legal entitlements and efforts by the Turkish state to enroll Syrian children into schools, there has been limited success outside the camps. In urban areas, there have been reports of some schools rejecting Syrian children due to discrimination, a lack of capacity, or ignorance of the law.3 Similarly, there is inconsistency in the application and acceptance of Syrians by health workers. Inter-viewees have also complained of the speed in which rules governing Syrians in Turkey change and of not being able to find information on this. This inconsist-ency and a lack of transparency in the implementation of laws and regulations governing Syrians make their situation insecure and untenable.
Year 2016
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
93 Report

Migration Policy and Health Insecurity. Italy's response to COVID-19 and the impact of the Security Decree

Authors Sebastian Carlotti
Year 2020
Journal Name Rivista Trimestrale di Scienza dell'Amministrazione
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
94 Journal Article

Gesundheitszugang von syrischen, irakischen und afghanischen Geflüchteten in Österreich: Ergebnisse aus dem Refugee Health and Integration Survey

Year 2019
Book Title Migration and Integration 7. Dialogue between policy, research, and practice.
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
95 Book Chapter

The impact of flight experiences on the psychological wellbeing of unaccompanied refugee minors

Principal investigator Ilse Derluyn (Principal Investigator)
Description
Since early 2015, the media continuously confront us with images of refugee children drowning in the Mediterranean, surviving in appalling conditions in camps or walking across Europe. Within this group of fleeing children, a considerable number is travelling without parents, the unaccompanied refugee minors. While the media images testify to these flight experiences and their possible huge impact on unaccompanied minors’ wellbeing, there has been no systematic research to fully capture these experiences, nor their mental health impact. Equally, no evidence exists on whether the emotional impact of these flight experiences should be differentiated from the impact of the traumatic events these minors endured in their home country or from the daily stressors in the country of settlement. This project aims to fundamentally increase our knowledge of the impact of experiences during the flight in relation to past trauma and current stressors. To achieve this aim, it is essential to set up a longitudinal follow-up of a large group of unaccompanied refugee minors, whereby our study starts from different transit countries, crosses several European countries, and uses innovative methodological and mixed-methods approaches. I will hereby not only document the psychological impact these flight experiences may have, but also the way in which care and reception structures for unaccompanied minors in both transit and settlement countries can contribute to reducing this mental health impact. This proposal will fundamentally change the field of migration studies, by introducing a whole new area of study and novel methodological approaches to study these themes. Moreover, other fields, such as trauma studies, will be directly informed by the project, as also clinical, educational and social work interventions for victims of multiple trauma. Last, the findings on the impact of reception and care structures will be highly informative for policy makers and practitioners.
Year 2017
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
97 Project

Gesundheitszugang von syrischen, irakischen und afghanischen Geflüchteten in Österreich: Ergebnisse aus dem Refugee Health and Integration Survey

Year 2019
Book Title Migration and Integration 7. Dialogue between policy, research, and practice.
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
98 Book Chapter

De(constructing) the refugees’ right to the city: State-run camps versus commoning practices in Athens, Thessaloniki and Mytilene

Year 2018
Book Title International Interdisciplinary Conference on Refugees and Forced Immigration Studies
 Conference Proceedings
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
99 Book Chapter
SHOW FILTERS
Ask us