Unaccompanied minors

Unaccompanied minors are foreign nationals below the age of 18 who are separated from their parents and other relatives, and who are not cared for by an adult. This category includes minors who are left unaccompanied after they entered a new country (IOM, 2011). The group is interchangeably defined as ‘unaccompanied children’ or ‘unaccompanied migrant minors’. Research in this category includes studies on integration, trauma, the transition to adulthood, children’s rights, and migration policy and management.

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Unaccompanied immigrant minors in the Canary Islands: A legal approach

Authors El Observatorio de la Inmigración de Tenerife (OBITen)
Description
The Canary Islands have received significant numbers of unaccompanied minors, especially during 2006. This pheno-menon has resulted in the need to develop an appropriate policy response across the Spanish State and the European Union. The proposals to establish special protected status for unaccompanied migrant children have generated con-siderable controversy within the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands, since it has assumed competence for taking the necessary measures for the protection of minors within its territory. This paper provides an overview of the relevant legislation and policies on reception, return and integration applicable to unaccompanied minors, analysing the difficulties that policymakers must take into account as they address the phenomenon of child migration
Year 2012
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3 Report

Unaccompanied immigrant minors in the Canary Islands: A legal approach

Description
The Canary Islands have received significant numbers of unaccompanied minors, especially during 2006. This pheno-menon has resulted in the need to develop an appropriate policy response across the Spanish State and the European Union. The proposals to establish special protected status for unaccompanied migrant children have generated con-siderable controversy within the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands, since it has assumed competence for taking the necessary measures for the protection of minors within its territory. This paper provides an overview of the relevant legislation and policies on reception, return and integration applicable to unaccompanied minors, analysing the difficulties that policymakers must take into account as they address the phenomenon of child migration
Year 2012
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
4 Report

Unaccompanied immigrant minors in the Canary Islands: A legal approach

Description
The Canary Islands have received significant numbers of unaccompanied minors, especially during 2006. This pheno-menon has resulted in the need to develop an appropriate policy response across the Spanish State and the European Union. The proposals to establish special protected status for unaccompanied migrant children have generated con-siderable controversy within the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands, since it has assumed competence for taking the necessary measures for the protection of minors within its territory. This paper provides an overview of the relevant legislation and policies on reception, return and integration applicable to unaccompanied minors, analysing the difficulties that policymakers must take into account as they address the phenomenon of child migration
Year 2012
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5 Report

The impact of flight experiences on the psychological wellbeing of unaccompanied refugee minors

Principal investigator Ilse Derluyn (Principal Investigator)
Description
Since early 2015, the media continuously confront us with images of refugee children drowning in the Mediterranean, surviving in appalling conditions in camps or walking across Europe. Within this group of fleeing children, a considerable number is travelling without parents, the unaccompanied refugee minors. While the media images testify to these flight experiences and their possible huge impact on unaccompanied minors’ wellbeing, there has been no systematic research to fully capture these experiences, nor their mental health impact. Equally, no evidence exists on whether the emotional impact of these flight experiences should be differentiated from the impact of the traumatic events these minors endured in their home country or from the daily stressors in the country of settlement. This project aims to fundamentally increase our knowledge of the impact of experiences during the flight in relation to past trauma and current stressors. To achieve this aim, it is essential to set up a longitudinal follow-up of a large group of unaccompanied refugee minors, whereby our study starts from different transit countries, crosses several European countries, and uses innovative methodological and mixed-methods approaches. I will hereby not only document the psychological impact these flight experiences may have, but also the way in which care and reception structures for unaccompanied minors in both transit and settlement countries can contribute to reducing this mental health impact. This proposal will fundamentally change the field of migration studies, by introducing a whole new area of study and novel methodological approaches to study these themes. Moreover, other fields, such as trauma studies, will be directly informed by the project, as also clinical, educational and social work interventions for victims of multiple trauma. Last, the findings on the impact of reception and care structures will be highly informative for policy makers and practitioners.
Year 2017
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7 Project

Unaccompanied Minors? An analysis of the legal situation of abandoned children born in Hungary

Authors Mária TEMESVARI
Description
In recent years changes in Hungarian citizenship policy and legislation have aroused public interest. The efforts of the Hungarian government to facilitate the naturalisation of ethnic Hungarians particularly encountered esistance from neighbouring countries,1 and was also viewed critically by some scholars.2 At the same time, the issue of unaccompanied minors has been high on the political agenda in EU Member States, including Hungary. Various EU institutions and bodies have commissioned studies and reports to analyse the situation in the European Union3 and an Action Plan was launched in order to ensure greater coherence and cooperation and to improve the protection offered to this vulnerable group.4 Nevertheless, a group of unaccompanied minor children, who do not fit into the traditional definition of unaccompanied minors in Europe, has been neglected. These children were born in Hungary of a foreign national, but of a Hungarian speaking and presumably ethnic Hungarian mother who subsequently abandoned the child in hospital shortly after birth. Despite liberal citizenship policy and an existing legal framework for the protection of unaccompanied minors, these children do not, for various reasons, obtain any nationality at or after birth and remain in a legal limbo for many months or even years. The aim of this paper is to explore the legal situation of these children in three areas: citizenship, immigration status and reception and care, and to analyse to what extent the current practices of the Guardianship Office and the Office of Immigration and Nationality is in compliance with Hungary’s international legal obligations, with Community law and, indeed, with domestic law. Particular attention will be paid to the obligations of Hungary as set out in the Convention of the Rights of the Child, the Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. As an unclear citizenship status constitutes the main reason for their peculiar situation, we will also look at the possibility of granting Hungarian citizenship or stateless status.
Year 2012
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8 Report

Wie Alter den Unterschied macht: Klassifikationspraktiken, Zugehörigkeit und politische Subjektivität bei jungen Geflüchteten in Deutschland

Principal investigator Katharina Schramm (Principal Investigator)
Description
Was konstituiert und kennzeichnet Minder- und Volljährigkeit bei Geflüchteten? Wie macht das Alter bei ihnen einen (aufenthalts-)rechtlichen, politischen und affektiven Unterschied? Diesen beiden Hauptfragen gehen wir in unserem Projekt nach. Es gibt immer wieder heftige öffentliche Debatten zum Alter von Flüchtlingen und zu rechtsmedizinischen Altersschätzungspraktiken, bei denen u.a. Röntgenaufnahmen von Schlüsselbeinen herangezogen und die Genitalien der Jugendlichen inspiziert werden. Denn unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge haben andere Rechte als erwachsene Geflüchtete: sie haben Anspruch auf einen Platz in einer Jugendwohnung, einen Sprachkurs und schulische Ausbildung. Zugleich müssen sie den Vorgaben pädagogischer Betreuung und denen von Vormündern folgen. Vor allem haben sie andere Möglichkeiten, ihr Bleiben in Deutschland zu organisieren. So ist es beinahe unmöglich, sie abzuschieben. Im Zentrum unserer Untersuchung stehen folgende Dimensionen:1) Klassifikationsprozesse, d.h. die Hervorbringung und Ausprägung der Differenzkategorie Alter in Praktiken der Altersfestsetzung; 2) die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Klassifikationen, d.h. altersspezifische Zugehörigkeiten, Rechte, Möglichkeiten und Einschränkungen von jungen Flüchtlingen mit dem Status "unbegleitete Minderjährige". Zur Umsetzung unserer Forschungsfragen ist eine ethnographische Langzeitstudie vorgesehen. Darin führen wir an allen wichtigen Stationen des Ankommens von jungen Geflüchteten teilnehmende Beobachtungen durch und interviewen die zentralen Akteure der verschiedenen Verfahren. Hierzu zählen die Erstaufnahme ebenso wie jugendamtliche, pädagogische und rechtsmedizinische Praktiken der Altersschätzung sowie daran geknüpfte Widerspruchsprozesse. Schließlich sollen auch Asylanhörungen beim Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge in den Blick genommen werden.Grundlegend für die oben aufgeführten Untersuchungsdimensionen ist unser Verständnis der Differenzkategorie Alter als kontingent, situativ und abhängig von spezifischen Praktiken der Hervorbringung. So können wir erforschen, welche Elemente in medizinischen, pädagogischen und bürokratischen Praxen (ir)relevant und entscheidend werden, wenn es um die Frage geht: ist ein Flüchtling minderjährig? Die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Klassifikation untersuchen wir mit unserem Konzept von politischer Subjektivität, was sowohl Rechte und Handlungsspielräume als auch affektive Zugehörigkeit zusammen denk- und untersuchbar macht.Durch diese erste ethnographische Analyse der Hervorbringung und Wirkmächtigkeit von Alter im Migrationszusammenhang entwickelt das Projekt neue Ansatzpunkte für eine kritische Intervention in den dominanten öffentlichen Diskurs zur Altersschätzung bei jungen Flüchtlingen. Unser Projekt leistet einen theoretischen und empirischen Beitrag an der Schnittstelle von Medizinanthropologie, Wissenschafts- und Technikforschung (STS), Studien zu Flucht und Migration und der Kindheits- und Jugendforschung.
Year 2019
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9 Project

Unaccompanied Minors in Norway : Policies, Practices and Data in 2014

Authors Staver Anne, Lidén Hilde
Description
This study presents policies, practices and statistics on unaccompanied minor asylum seekers from arrival until settlement or return. It is a contribution to a comparative study by the European Migration Network.
Year 2014
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10 Report

Unaccompanied refugee children - vulnerability and agency

Authors Ketil Eide, Anders Hjern
Year 2013
Journal Name ACTA PAEDIATRICA
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11 Journal Article

Who's Best Interests ? Exploring Unaccompanied Minor's Rights Through the Lens of Migration and Asylum Procedures

Principal investigator Mateja Sedmak (Principal Investigator), Daniel Senovilla Hernández (Investigator)
Description
The project “In whose best interest? Exploring Unaccompanied Minors’ Rights Through the Lens of Migration and Asylum Procedures (MinAs)” is a research project carried out in four European countries (Slovenia, Austria, France and United Kingdom) in the period from June 2014 to December 2015. European Commission finances the project and its main aim is to identify and recommend better procedures and protection measures for unaccompanied minors (UAM). The project examines UAMs’ reception, protection, asylum and return procedures and focuses on: 1. The concept of best interests of the child (BIC). 2. The formal processes of best interests determination (BID). The project looks at both concepts in the actual legal framework for UAM in reception, protection, asylum and return procedures in the four EU countries. Many European countries have not yet introduced best interests determination procedures into their national legislation for UAM. In these cases, lack of appropriate safeguards for UAM are most likely to be identified, leaving the possibility of (too) flexible interpretation of the child’s best interests, which in some cases may be subjected to nationalist, xenophobic and racist discourse. In order to contribute to fulfilling the national obligations set out by international law, as well as following the aims of the European Commission, the project analyses the practical, philosophical and phenomenological dimensions of the best interests of the child, which will enable a deeper understanding of the best interests of children as well providing a solid basis for proper implementation of the principle in practice.
Year 2014
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12 Project

(Member) States’ Approaches to Unaccompanied Minors Following Status Determination (Country report Luxembourg)

Authors Ralph Petry, Adolfo Sommarribas, Kelly Adao Do Carmo, ...
Description
The legal framework in Luxembourg does not provide a specific legal status for unaccompanied minors (hereafter UAM), which is why the large majority of them apply for international protection. This allows them to stay in the country and to benefit from social and legal assistance, as well as from accommodation. Cases of UAMs presumed or identified victims of human trafficking are rare in Luxembourg. Overall, specific legal frameworks exist according to the status of the UAM: The Law on Asylum, the Law on Immigration and the Law on victims of trafficking in human beings. This framework is completed by general provisions of the Youth Protection Law, which applies to all minors independent of their immigration or legal status. Until the influx of applicants for international protection in 2015 and 2016, the phenomenon of unaccompanied minors has been relatively small in Luxembourg. Particularly 2015 was marked by a high number of UAMs applying for international protection, with 102 introductions of applications compared to 31 applications in 2014. Since, the number of applications has stabilised over the last two years, with 51 applications in 2016 and 50 applications in 2017. In 2015, Afghanistan and Albania were the leading countries of origin of UAMs. In 2016, Afghanistan was still the leading country of origin, followed by Morocco. In 2017, the profiles of the UAMs changed again, with Albania and Morocco as leading countries of origin. In Luxembourg, UAMs are predominantly boys and a large majority is close to the age of majority, or have already reached the age of majority, when a final decision on their application for international protection is issued. However, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they were confronted with a new phenomenon in 2017, namely the arrival of very young UAMs aged between 12 and 14. Every UAM, whether s/he files an application for international protection or not, will be assigned an ad-hoc administrator as soon as possible in order to assist him/her in all legal proceedings. In addition to the designation of an ad-hoc administrator, the organisations that accommodate the UAMs applying for international protection usually request the guardianship (either institutional or personal guardianship) of the UAM who has introduced his application. Different from the ad-hoc administrator, the guardian is assisting and supporting the UAM in all daily life affairs, such as social guidance, integration, education, medical care, acquisition of language skills, leisure activities, etc. In regard to education, the overall aim in Luxembourg is to integrate migrant children, independent of their immigration status, into the general educational system as soon as possible. The latter has experienced a diversification of its offer with a number of specialised measures and services. Together with leisure and extracurricular activities, school is considered to be one of the main contributors to the overall well-being and integration of UAMs into the Luxembourgish society. There are no integration measures that specifically target UAMs. There are no specific transition measures or procedures for UAMs who are approaching their majority, neither in regard to the accommodation and guardianship arrangements, nor in the general context of integration. The organisations responsible for the accommodation and care of the UAMs provide them with a supervision and support according to their specific individual needs. This is also true for the respective legal framework of the UAM, including eventual extensions of residence permits. The return of UAMs is considered to be rare in the Luxembourgish context. As mentioned earlier, this is related to the fact that the large majority of UAMs applying for international protection are close to the age of majority or have already reached majority when a final decision on their application is issued. Furthermore, although foreseen by the Immigration Law, Luxembourg does not carry out forced returns of persons considered to be unaccompanied minors. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM), responsible for (assisted) voluntary returns, reported that they have approximately one voluntary return of an UAM every two years. In 2017, following the recommendation of the evaluation of the Schengen acquis in the area of return in Luxembourg, the government adopted the creation of a new commission with the function of assessing the best interest of the child in the context of return of UAMs. This commission entered into force at the beginning of 2018 and is composed of members of the prosecution service, the National Childhood Office (ONE), the Luxembourg Reception and Integration Agency (OLAI), and finally the Directorate of Immigration, which is chairing the commission. In addition, the ad-hoc administrator is invited to attend the commission meeting for the minor s/he represents. Based on the elements of his/her application, an individual opinion assessing the best interest of the child, in the context of his/her return, will be given for each minor. One of the major reported challenges is the appointment of legal representatives of UAMs (ad-hoc administrator and guardian), as well as the lack of precision of the legal provisions in this context. In the context of return, the Directorate of Immigration reported that they are faced with challenges in regard to getting in contact with the respective countries of origin as well as in regard to cases of applicants not telling the truth. One of the main good practices that has been identified by a number of stakeholders are the new care and accommodation arrangements, allowing to house UAMs in specifically dedicated reception facilities with a 24/7 supervision, depending on the availability of these facilities. In the same context, it was reported that it is of great importance to provide the minors with an environment of trust and support, to listen to them and to reassure them in order to be able to understand their current situation. Particularly the approach of supporting them in elaborating a life plan or life project (“projet de vie”) is considered as being very important for the stability and general well-being as well as for the integration of the UAMs. In addition, it is also important to support them in other matters of integration, such as education, acquisition of language skills, extracurricular activities, etc. In the context of return, Directorate of Immigration reported the newly concluded agreement with IOM in order to conduct family assessments of UAMs in the countries of origin as a good practice. On the one hand, this assessment is one element that will be taken into consideration in the examination of the application of the minor. On the other hand, it helps in assessing the best interest of the child in the event of a return if the application is rejected.
Year 2018
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13 Report

Unaccompanied minor asylum seekers in the Netherlands. Choice or chance?

Authors Research and Documentation Centre, Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security, Sanne Noyon, Monika Smit, ...
Description
Worldwide, many migrants leave their countries in search of safety and internation- al protection. In 2015, the number of asylum seekers in Europe reached a peak. Among them were unaccompanied minor asylum seekers (UMAs). The current study aimed to shed light on the push and pull factors that played a role in the flight of the UMAs who arrived in the Netherlands in 2015, to understand the processes through which these minors ultimately ended up in this country, their expectations regarding the intended destination, if any, and their satisfaction with life in the Netherlands – topics about which little is known so far.
Year 2018
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14 Report

Seeking Asylum Alone: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection in the U.S.

Authors Jacqueline. Bhabha, Susan, Master of Science. Schmidt
Year 2007
Journal Name The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth
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15 Journal Article

Unaccompanied Migrant Minors at the Frontier of Human Rights. The Spanish Case

Authors Patrizia Rinaldi
Year 2019
Journal Name The International Journal of Children’s Rights
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19 Journal Article

Different perspectives on emotional and behavioural problems in unaccompanied refugee children and adolescents

Authors Ilse Derluyn, Eric Broekaert
Year 2007
Journal Name Ethnicity & Health
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20 Journal Article

Refugee Youth Who Arrived in Sweden as Unaccompanied Minors and Separated Children: Education and Labour Market Well-being

Authors Aycan Celikaksoy, Eskil Wadensjoe, Aycan Çelikaksoy, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Nordic Journal of Migration Research
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23 Journal Article

¿Migrantes o Refugiados? La crisis humanitaria de menores no acompañados que México y Estados Unidos no reconocen

Authors Ruth Elizabeth Prado Pérez
Year 2017
Journal Name Revista Internacional de Estudios Migratorios (RIEM)
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25 Journal Article

Tracing UMAs´ families A comparative study of some European countries´ practices and experiences in tracing the parents or caregivers of unaccompanied minor asylum seekers

Authors Kirsten Danielsen, Marie Louise Seeberg
Description
This report is a study of different European countries´ practices and experiences in tracing the parents or other caregivers of separated minor asylum seekers. The term "unaccompanied minor asylum seekers" (UMAs) refers to children under the age of 18 who are separated from their caregivers, and who apply for asylum in a foreign country. The increase in the numbers of UMAs arriving in Europe from 2000-2003, along with an understanding of UMAs as particularly vulnerable, formed the point of departure for the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration to initiate this study. Our main source of data has been an electronic, web-based survey. The questionnaire was sent to Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. None of these countries have a separate tracing unit within the organization responsible for tracing UMAs´ families. All the countries co-operate with NGOs, mostly with the national offices of the Red Cross on an ad hoc basis.Some countries make use of their embassies or other diplomatic missions in the UMAs countries of origin. Our findings show that tracing work is both difficult and resource-demanding, and the success rate generally low. Furthermore, not all successful family tracing leads to family reunification. In most cases, if the countries do not succeed in their tracing attempts or adequate care is not available in the country of origin or a third country, the minor is given temporary or permanent residence in the receiving country.
Year 2006
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26 Report

Unaccompanied Foreign Minors: Life projects of young Africans in the Canary Islands

Description
The intensification of irregular African immigration in the Canary Islands resulted in the arrival of thousands of unaccompanied fo-reign minors (MENA in Spanish: Menores Extranjeros No Acompa-ñados), reaching a peak of maximum intensity in 2006 during the so-called “cayuco crisis”. This population of immigrants under the age of 18 is under the tutelage of the government of the Canary Islands and is placed in specific reception centers for foreign mi-nors (CAME in Spanish: Centro de Acogida para Menores Extran-jeros). The paper presents the methodology and main results of a research project, implemented by the author for the Observatory of Immigration in Tenerife (OBITen), about what these young Africans experienced when turned into Unaccompanied Foreign Minors by an administrative process whose aim is to protect them as vulne-rable persons.The project fieldwork included in-depth interviews with immigrant minors and experts. Additionally we carried out semi-structured interviews with professionals linked to the development and edu-cation of the unaccompanied foreign minors. We also organized focus groups with the resident Canary Islands population.The results we obtained reveal shortcomings in several areas: in the personal and emotional experience this process supposes for the migrants, in the area of administration and management and, particularly, concerning the transition from the condition of unac-companied foreign minor to the status of adult immigrant.
Year 2012
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28 Report

Levekår i mottak for enslige mindreårige asylsøkere

Authors Hilde Lidén, Kjetil Eide, Knut Nilsen, ...
Description
Enslige mindreårige asylsøkere utgjør en særlig sårbar gruppe migranter. Rapporten drøfter levekår på mottak formindreårige over 15 år som er under utlendingsmyndighetenes (UDI) ansvar. Arbeidet er utført på oppdrag av UDI. Det er undersøkt levekår på følgende områder: boforhold, omsorg, helse, kosthold, tilgang til sosialt nettverk og aktivitetstilbud. Hjelpevergenes involvering og tilgang til skole, helsetjeneste og lokalt barnevern er også vurdert. Undersøkelsen består av en kartleggingsundersøkelse og feltstudier ved seks mottak. Det ble brukt PhotoVoice som metode i intervju av 30 ungdommer. I tillegg er mottaksansatte og deres samarbeidspartnere i velferdstjenesten intervjuet. Rapporten inneholder dessuten en litteraturgjennomgang av forskning som berører omsorgsbehov og -utøvelse for enslige mindreårige flyktninger. Ungdommene kan deles inn i en majoritet med kort opphold på tre til fem måneder og en mindre gruppe av lengeværendebeboere. Rapporten konkluderer med at det er særlig livssituasjonen for de lengeværende som må forbedres og kommer med en rekke anbefalinger for å bedre forholdene for denne gruppen asylsøkere. Det foreslås å lovregulere mottaksforhold; etablere en uavhengig tilsynsordning; opprette basismottak og desentraliserte enheter, øke bemanning og kompetanse, innføre norm for bostandard; styrke omsorgsarbeidet for lengeværende beboere. Det anbefales rett til grunnskoleopplæring for de over 16 år og styrket innsats og samarbeid ved forsvinninger og ved bekymring for menneskehandel. Det må også sikres at alle mindreårige får tilstrekkelig bistand av verger.
Year 2013
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33 Report

Pre-flight experiences and migration stories: the accounts of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children

Authors Peter E. Hopkins, Malcolm Hill
Year 2008
Journal Name Children's Geographies
Citations (WoS) 55
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35 Journal Article

Leaving family behind: Understanding the irregular migration of unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors

Year 2017
Book Title A long way to go: Irregular Migration Patterns, Processes, Drivers and Decision-Making
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36 Book Chapter

Forlatte barn, ankerbarn, betrodde barn ... Et transnasjonalt perspektiv på enslige, mindreårige asylsøkere

Authors Ada Engebrigtsen
Description
Rapporten er utarbeidet for NOVA av Ada Engebrigtsen. Rapporten handler om enslige, mindreårige asylsøkere i Norge med vekt på deres familiebånd og bakgrunn og hvordan det offentlige tilrettelegger for at disse barna skal kunne opprettholde denne tilknytningen og knytte nye bånd i Norge. Situasjonen i Nederland vil bli brukt som et komparativt eksempel. Studien er basert på intervju med 25 personer som arbeider med enslige, mindreårige asylsøkere på forskjellige nivå i privat og offentlig virksomhet i Norge og i Nederland.
Year 2002
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41 Report

On my own : protection challenges for unaccompanied and separated children in Jordan, Lebanon and Greece

Authors Luigi ACHILLI, Hannah LEACH, Monica MATARAZZO, ...
Description
This report indicates that the best interests of these vulnerable children are consistently violated by inconsistent or non-existent adherence to updated procedural safeguards, strained institutional capacity, and state-level and public concern that some unaccompanied and separated children pose "security concerns".
Year 2017
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43 Report

Unaccompanied Migrant Children and Youth

Authors Kate Swanson, Stuart C. Aitken, Elizabeth G. Kennedy
Book Title Children and Borders
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46 Book Chapter

Dropping out of Education: Refugee Youth Who Arrived as Unaccompanied Minors and Separated Children

Year 2019
Book Title Unaccompanied Children: from migration to integration
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48 Book Chapter

Smartphone-basierte Analyse von Migrationstrends zur Identifikation von Schleuserrouten

Principal investigator André Calero Valdez (Principal Investigator)
Description
Das deutsch-österreichische Kooperationsprojekt Smar­tIdentifikation wird ein System entwickeln, um Daten aus mitgeführten Dokumenten und Smartphones aus­zuwerten. Mithilfe dieser Daten sollen die Identität von Personen sowie die von ihnen getätigten Angaben über­prüft werden. Dazu werden die für eine Alterserkennung auf dem Smartphone gespeicherten Bilder herangezo­gen. Weiterhin wird versucht, Schleuserrouten mittels Analysen aus den erhobenen Daten zu identifizieren. Da­bei sollen auch alternative Kommunikationsplattformen zur Entdeckung der Schleuser analysiert werden. Parallel zu den technischen Entwicklungen werden die recht­lichen und ethischen Rahmenbedingungen für einen akzeptierten und rechtskonformen Einsatz des Systems im Projekt erforscht und in die technische Realisierung überführt. nnovationen und Perspektiven Das System wird es ermöglichen, bei mobilen Kontrol­len die Aussagen der Migrantinnen und Migranten zu überprüfen und ihre Mitnahme zu Polizeiwachen auf ein Minimum zu reduzieren. Weiterhin wird die Verfolgung von Schleuserkriminalität durch die gewonnenen Daten über Routen und Chats unterstützt. Zum Nachweis der Einsatztauglichkeit werden Feldtests durchgeführt.
Year 2018
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49 Project

International migration in Luxembourg. Continuous Reporting System on Migration OECD – 2015

Authors Birte Nienaber, Linda Dionisio, Adolfo Sommarribas, ...
Description
Migration has always played an important role in Luxembourg’s history. In 2014 and 2015, due to the refugee crisis, migration became the focus of the economic, social and political debates, in particular during Luxembourg’s Presidency of the Council of the European Union. As a country that is a founding Member of the European Union and located at the centre of the EU, Luxembourg has a strong attraction for EU citizens and this - in turn - has a direct incidence on the demographic composition of the country and the workforce. Luxembourg’s demographic composition reflects its migratory diversity. In 2014, the net migration balance was positive having increased by 6.8% in comparison to 2013. As such, the country’s rising population numbers were mainly attributed to the immigration of individuals coming from EU Member States and other European countries. These numbers include European Union (EU), European economic area (EEA) citizens and third-country nationals from non-EU European countries. The country’s diversity is equally reflected in its labour market which heavily relies on its foreign workforce. In fact, Luxembourgish citizens represented 31% of the workforce in 2014, while EU citizens reached 65% and third-country nationals only 4%. Cross border workers also represented a very important part of the Luxembourgish workforce with 44.4 %. Due to the refugee crisis, the number of international protection applicants increased between 2013 and 2014. As a consequence, the recognition rate of the status increased as well. On the other hand, the number of returns continued to decrease. In order to respond to the crisis in an adequate manner, additional funds and staff for the Directorate of Immigration and the Luxembourg Reception and Integration Agency were allocated. Given the magnitude of the migration crisis and the pressure on external border Member States, the EU Council took the decision to relocate 160.000 international protection applicants (European relocation scheme) who are currently in Greece and in Italy. In order to implement this decision, Luxembourg agreed to welcome 527 international protection applicants. The first group of 30 relocated individuals from Greece arrived in Luxembourg on 4 November 2015. During 2014, Luxembourg implemented several EU directives. Directive 2011/36/EU of 5 April 2011 on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings was implemented by the Law of 9 April 2014, which reinforced the rights of victims of trafficking in human beings by criminalising begging and the trafficking of children. Extensive work was undertaken to transpose Directives 2012/32/EU and 2012/33/EU of the Common European Asylum System. Two draft bills are currently within the last stages of the legislative procedure and their implementation is set to take place in 2015, after several amendments were brought to the draft bills at the end of September and October 2015. On the national level, recent legislative changes and reforms answer to several aims, ranging from attracting certain categories of migrants to strengthening the support provided to unaccompanied minors. The creation of a new authorisation of stay for investors and the modification of certain authorisations of stay to adapt them for business managers are currently under discussion by an inter-ministerial working group, which is preparing two draft bills on these issues.
Year 2015
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53 Report

Unaccompanied refugee children–vulnerability and agency

Year 2013
Journal Name Acta paediatrica
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55 Journal Article

Unaccompanied Migrant Children. Social, Legal, and Ethical Perspectives

Authors S. E. Rap
Year 2020
Journal Name NORDIC JOURNAL OF MIGRATION RESEARCH
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57 Journal Article

Not adults in miniature: unaccompanied child asylum seekers and the new U.S. guidelines

Authors J Bhabha
Year 1999
Journal Name International Journal of Refugee Law
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58 Journal Article

Cohousing and case management for unaccompanied young adult refugees in Antwerp

Principal investigator Noel Clycq (Promotor), Christiane Timmerman (Promotor)
Description
Within the refugee population, unaccompanied minors constitute the most vulnerable group, for which European and international standards offer care and protection. However, when these minors reach the age of adulthood (+18), they are no longer able to benefit from subsidized shelter, enrollment in reception classes, customized trainings, and the support from a legal guardian. The CURANT consortium (OCMW Antwerpen, CeMIS (UA), Atlas Inburgering en Integratie Antwerpen, Solentra, Vormingplus, Jes vzw) radically wants to break with this reality, by means of two innovations to be 'tested' on a selection of minimum 75 and maximum 135 unaccompanied young adult refugees between 2016 and 2019: 1) Co-housing with volunteer buddies (not only for reasons of shelter, but as a means to sustainable 1-on-1 integration) 2) Circular integrated individual trajectories (focused on activation, education, independent living, language, leisure, social integration and psychological counseling), with intensive follow-up by means of individual case management. As the academic stakeholder, CeMIS is in charge of the evaluation study of this social intervention.The framework for evalution is 'theory-driven evaluation' (TDE, Cheng 2015). The researchers will assess the impact of co-housing schemes and the circular approach on the integration of the target group by using a multi-method research design, including in-depth interviews, observation and survey.
Year 2016
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59 Project

Between a rock and a hard place unaccompanied children seeking asylum in Ukraine

Authors Katharine Williamson, UNHCR. Policy Development and Evaluation Service
Year 2011
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60 Report

Underveis En studie av enslige mindreårige asylsøkere

Authors Cecilie Øien
Description
Det siste tiåret har en stadig økende mengde barn og unge kommet til Europa som enslige mindreårige. Bak avgjørelsen om at enslige mindreårige sendes ut eller selv velger å migrere, ligger det både sikkerhetsmessige faktorer og sosiale og økonomiske årsaker. Migrasjon er en kompleks prosess, og både deres egne og familiens ønsker utfordres av de mulighetene og begrensningene som finnes i transittland, som igjen påvirker hvilke land ungdommene ender opp i. Reisen skjer på en tid i livet hvor de er underveis fra å være barn til å bli voksen, og både ungdommene og deres familie har et håp om at de skal kunne få en bedre framtid om de reiser ut enn det de ville fått i opprinnelseslandet. Rapporten er gjort på oppdrag for Justis- og politidepartementet.
Year 2010
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62 Report

‘I just wanted to be safe’: Agency and decisionmaking among unaccompanied minor asylum seekers

Authors I. Kulu-Glasgow, S. Noyon, M. Smit
Year 2019
Book Title Unaccompanied Children: from migration to integration
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64 Book Chapter

Global issue of unaccompanied migrant children and adolescents and human rights progress report of the Human Rights Council Advisory Committee

Authors Karla Hananía de Varela, UN. Human Rights Council. Advisory Committee
Year 2016
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65 Report

Wissenschaftliche Begleitung des Pilotprojekts 'Open.Heart – PatInnen und Gastfamilien für unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge' der Kinder- und Jugendanwaltschaft Salzburg

Principal investigator Eberhard Raithelhuber (Principal Investigator), Maria Amancay Jenny (Project Team Member), Doris Reithmaier (Project Team Member), Hila Kakar (Project Team Member), Kübra Çaglar (Project Team Member)
Description
Die wissenschaftliche Begleitforschung fragt danach, welche Bedeutung solchen Formen der Mentorenschaft und der familienähnlichen Lebensverhältnisse für die verschiedenen Beteiligten ('PatInnen', 'Gastfamilien', 'unbegleitete minderjährige Flüchtlinge') entwickeln, bspw. im Kontext von Übergängen im Lebenslauf. Gleichzeitig wird in den Blick genommen, was in den verschiedenen sozialen Begegnungen im Pilotprojekt interaktiv hergestellt wird – bspw. in Ausbildung und Fortbildung der 'PatInnen', im Rahmen des 'Matchings' von PatInnen und Jugendlichen oder in den alltäglichen Aktivitäten der Patenschaften und Gastfamilien. Qualitative Interviews zu 2 Zeitpunkten (Längsschnitt), teils muttersprachlich (d.h. in Fremdsprachen), mit 2 Hauptzielgruppen. Ethnographische Datenerhebung, v.a. teilnehmende Beobachtung (auch Dokumentenanalyse)
Year 2016
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66 Project

Promouvoir l'accès aux droits fondamentaux des mineurs étrangers non accompagnés sans protection dans l'Union européenne

Principal investigator Daniel Senovilla Hernandez (Coordinator)
Description
Le projet « PUCAFREU » a pour objectif d’analyser les causes qui entravent l’accès des mineurs non accompagnés sans protection aux droits fondamentaux garantis par la législation internationale. Sa finalité est de promouvoir un meilleur accès aux droits fondamentaux des mineurs non accompagnés et non protégés dans le contexte de l’UE. Le projet s’articule principalement autour de trois axes et d’une action pilote qui sera exclusivement mise en œuvre dans le contexte belge : Axe 1 : Une recherche exploratoire sur la situation sociale et l’accès aux droits fondamentaux des mineurs non accompagnés sans protection dans quatre États d’accueil (Belgique, France, Italie et Espagne) et un cinquième Etat membre qui est essentiellement un pays d’origine de ce type particulier de migration (Roumanie). La recherche comprendra tout d’abord une analyse théorique sur des questions juridiques, essentiellement sur l’interprétation et l’application adéquate du contenu de la Convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits de l’enfant à la situation des mineurs non accompagnés qui vivent dans le territoire d’un État membre de l’UE. Deuxièmement, un processus identique de recherche de terrain sera mis en œuvre dans les cinq Etats qui constituent le champ d’application de ce projet. Cette recherche de terrain visera à explorer la situation des mineurs non accompagnés sans protection dans chaque territoire et les conditions et difficultés qu’ils trouvent pour faire valoir leurs droits fondamentaux. Axe 2 : La deuxième action cherche à constituer une plate-forme internationale, multidisciplinaire et multilingue intégrant des experts dans cette discipline. Cette plate-forme sera composée par des praticiens du droit (avocats, tuteurs, autorités administratives, magistrats, etc.), des experts de terrain (éducateurs, psychologues, travailleurs sociaux, etc.) et des universitaires de différentes disciplines. La plate-forme fonctionnera comme un espace d’échange de bonnes pratiques et de dénonce de mauvaises pratiques au niveau européen. La conception et la mise en œuvre de campagnes de sensibilisation adressées aux principaux acteurs institutionnels et au grand public sera un autre atout de cette action. Axe 3 : Le troisième axe prévoit la conception de séminaires de formation destinés aux professionnels du droit et autres acteurs de terrain. L’objectif est de développer et consolider les connaissances de ces praticiens par rapport aux besoins de protection des membres du groupe cible et à l’interprétation et application adéquate de la législation internationale et nationale contenant leurs droits fondamentaux. L’objectif ultime de ces séminaires de formation sera d’identifier les mécanismes juridiques et les outils dont les praticiens disposent pour aider les mineurs non accompagnés à faire valoir leurs droits fondamentaux dans chaque territoire. Action pilote : L’objectif de cette action est de créer et mettre en œuvre dans le contexte belge des permanences de conseil permettant aux mineurs d’origine Rom de recevoir des informations et d’être accompagnés dans leur accès aux droits fondamentaux. Les enfants Rom constituent un collectif particulièrement vulnérable et leur accès aux droits fondamentaux n’est pas garanti. Les permanences de conseil instaurées au sein de cette action pilote ont l’objectif d’informer ces enfants de leurs droits et, avec leur accord, les accompagner vers les dispositifs de protection prévus par l’Etat belge. Les partenaires : - 1) Migrations internationales, espaces et sociétés (MIGRINTER – UMR 6588). France. Coordinateur - 2) Centre d’Etudes sur la COopération Juridique Internationale. (CECOJI – UMR 6224). France. - 3) Service Droit des Jeunes. Belgique. - 4) Fundacion la Merced Migraciones. Espagne. - 5) Association Hors la Rue. France - 6) ASGI- Associazioni per gli studi giuridici sull’immigrazione. Italie. - 7) Fondation PARADA. Roumanie.
Year 2011
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67 Project

Eritrean Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Transition: A Focused Ethnography of Challenges and Needs

Authors Carlijn M. van Es, Marieke Sleijpen, Trudy Mooren, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT FOR CHILDREN & YOUTH
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70 Journal Article

Introduction

Authors Gabriella SANCHEZ
Year 2018
Journal Name Migration policy practice
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71 Journal Article

Experiences of arriving to Sweden as an unaccompanied asylum-seeking minor from Afghanistan: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Authors Sara Amalie O'Toole Thommessen, Paula Corcoran, Brenda K. Todd
Year 2015
Journal Name Psychology of Violence
Citations (WoS) 13
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78 Journal Article

Unaccompanied Refugee Children

Year 2009
Journal Name The Lancet
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80 Journal Article

Toward a Comprehensive Response to the Transnational Migration of Unaccompanied Minors in the United States

Year 2004
Journal Name Vanderbilt Journal Transnational Law
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87 Journal Article

ASSISTANCE TO UNACCOMPANIED REFUGEE MINORS*

Year 1996
Journal Name Refugee Survey Quarterly
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90 Journal Article

Annual report on migration and asylum 2017 – Luxembourg

Authors Sarah Jacobs, Kelly Adao Do Carmo, David Petry, ...
Description
Le présent rapport fait la synthèse des principaux débats et des évolutions majeures concernant les migrations et l’asile au Luxembourg en 2017. Le nombre de personnes demandant une protection internationale est resté élevé en 2017 (2 322 demandes) par rapport aux niveaux enregistrés avant la « crise migratoire » (1 091 en 2014). Toutefois, ce nombre est resté relativement stable par rapport aux deux années précédentes (2 447 en 2015 et 2 035 en 2016). Cette stabilité relative s’est également reflétée dans le débat public et politique dans le domaine des migrations et de l’asile. Depuis 2016, l’accent n’a cessé de se déplacer d’un discours « d’urgence » axé sur la mise en œuvre de mesures et de conditions d’accueil vers des discussions sur des mesures et des politiques d’intégration à plus long terme. À cet égard, le nouveau parcours d’intégration accompagné (PIA) peut être considéré comme un projet phare de l’OLAI, l’Office luxembourgeois de l’accueil et de l’intégration des étrangers. Le PIA vise à autonomiser les demandeurs et les bénéficiaires d’une protection internationale et à les soutenir dans le développement de leur projet de vie. Le parcours, obligatoire pour tous les demandeurs adultes de protection internationale, se compose d’une composante linguistique et d’une composante civique, et il est divisé en trois phases. Bien que l’augmentation des capacités d’hébergement des demandeurs de protection internationale (DPI) figure parmi les priorités des autorités nationales, le logement des DPI reste très problématique et a déclenché un débat à l’échelle nationale. Outre l’accès à la formation, les problèmes liés au logement des DPI ont été parmi les questions les plus fréquemment soulevées en 2017. La pression sur le logement des DPI et des bénéficiaires de protection internationale (BPI) est importante : le manque de logements abordables sur le marché privé, le nombre croissant de réunifications familiales et la progression du nombre de BPI et de personnes qui ont fait l’objet d’une décision de retour mais qui restent hébergées dans les structures de l’OLAI ont été identifiés comme facteurs de pression. Les difficultés liées à la construction de structures modulaires d’hébergement ont également persisté en 2017. Une certaine réticence de la population à l’égard de la construction de ces « villages conteneurs », prévue en réponse à l’afflux croissant qui a commencé en août 2015, était visible dans les recours introduits devant les tribunaux administratifs pour annuler les plans d’occupation des sols liés aux projets. Les conditions de vie au sein des structures d’accueil ont également fait l’objet de discussions. Elles portaient notamment sur l’absence d’équipement en cuisines de plusieurs lieux d’accueil, les différents systèmes d’approvisionnement en nourriture et les types de nourriture disponibles. Afin de répondre au nombre toujours important de DPI en provenance des pays des Balkans occidentaux, une procédure ultra-accélérée a été mise en place. Cette procédure a été instaurée pour diminuer les pressions sur les structures d’accueil et pour éviter de créer de faux espoirs pour les séjours de longue durée. En avril 2017, la structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg (SHUK) a été mise en place, afin d’héberger les DPI pour lesquels le Luxembourg n’est pas compétent pour examiner les demandes en vertu de l’application du règlement de Dublin. Ce nombre a fortement progressé. Le placement à la SHUK correspond à une assignation à résidence, donc à une alternative à la rétention. La structure nouvellement créée ainsi que les conditions d’affectation ont néanmoins été critiquées par la société civile. Plusieurs acteurs de la société civile ont manifesté leur opposition face à une disposition de la loi du 8 mars 2017 qui a étendu la période de rétention des adultes ou familles avec enfants de 72 heures à 7 jours afin de rendre plus efficiente l’organisation du retour. Un premier bilan du fonctionnement du Centre de rétention a été publié en 2017. Une commission chargée d’évaluer l’intérêt des mineurs non accompagnés dans le cadre d’une décision de retour a été créé fin 2017. La commission est chargée de mener à bien des évaluations individuelles concernant l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant dans le but de prendre une décision de retour ou d’accorder une autorisation de séjour. Parmi les éléments pris en considération lors de cette évaluation et dans le contexte d’une éventuelle décision de retour figurent également les informations fournies par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). Cette dernière a conclu un accord avec la Direction de l’immigration pour rechercher les parents de mineurs non accompagnés dans le pays d’origine. Comme les débats s’orientent lentement vers l’intégration à long terme, le Conseil de gouvernement a également approuvé l’élaboration d’un nouveau plan d’action national sur l’intégration. Le plan sera basé sur deux axes : l’accueil et le suivi des demandeurs de protection internationale et l’intégration des résidents non luxembourgeois au Luxembourg. L’Agence pour le Développement de l’Emploi (ADEM) a créé une cellule BPI au sein de son Service employeurs. Cette cellule fournit aux employeurs des renseignements sur les demandes d’emploi et les évaluations des compétences des BPI. Une nouvelle loi sur la nationalité luxembourgeoise est entrée en vigueur le 1er avril 2017. Cette loi s’inscrit dans le contexte démographique particulier du Luxembourg, caractérisé par une augmentation continue de la population totale avec, en parallèle, une diminution de la part des Luxembourgeois dans la population totale. A travers cette loi, le législateur veut favoriser l’intégration sociétale et politique des citoyens non luxembourgeois et renforcer la cohésion au sein de la communauté nationale. Les principaux changements introduits par la loi consistent en la réduction de la durée de résidence pour la naturalisation (de 7 à 5 ans), l’introduction du droit du sol de la première génération, la réinstauration de voies simplifiées d’acquisition de la nationalité luxembourgeoise par « option », ainsi que de nouveaux scénarios pour éviter les cas d’apatridie. La loi maintient les exigences linguistiques antérieures tout en procédant à quelques ajustements afin d’empêcher que les exigences linguistiques ne deviennent un obstacle insurmontable. En vue des élections communales du 8 octobre 2017, le ministère de la Famille, de l’Intégration et à la Grande Région a lancé une campagne d’information et de sensibilisation intitulée « Je peux voter » en janvier 2017. Cette campagne avait pour but d’inciter la population étrangère du Luxembourg à s’inscrire sur les listes électorales pour les élections communales. L’intention du Gouvernement de légiférer sur la dissimulation du visage était sans doute l’un des sujets les plus débattus dans le domaine lié à la vie au sein de la société au Luxembourg et l’intégration au sens large du terme, tant à la Chambre des députés que dans les médias et la sphère publique. Le projet de loi n° 7179 vise à modifier l’article 563 du Code pénal et à créer l’interdiction de dissimuler le visage dans certains espaces publics. Il définit la dissimulation du visage comme le fait de couvrir une partie ou la totalité du visage de façon à rendre l’identification de la personne impossible. Des vues opposées entre les parties prenantes – les partis politiques, les institutions publiques, la société civile ou les médias – se sont exprimées au sujet de la nécessité de légiférer en la matière et dans l’affirmative, sur les motifs et l’étendue de l’interdiction de la dissimulation du visage. Le phénomène des migrations a eu aussi comme conséquence de renforcer l’hétérogénéité de la population scolaire. Pour faire face à cette situation, les autorités scolaires ont continué à diversifier l’offre en matière d’éducation et de formation. Parmi les mesures mises en place, on peut signaler notamment l’élargissement des offres de cours d’alphabétisation et de formation de base, l’extension de l’offre au niveau des écoles internationales et européennes et la mise en place d’un programme d’éducation plurilingue au niveau de la petite enfance. Dans le domaine de l’immigration, les changements les plus importants concernent la politique d’admission de certaines catégories de ressortissants de pays tiers. À cet égard, le projet de loi n° 7188 vise principalement à transposer la Directive européenne 2016/801 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 11 mai 2016 sur les conditions d’entrée et de séjour des ressortissants de pays tiers à des fins de recherche, d’études, de formation, de volontariat, de programmes d’échanges d’élèves ou de projets éducatifs et de travail au pair. La directive vise à faire de l’Union européenne un centre mondial d’excellence en matière d’études et de formation, tout en favorisant les contacts entre les personnes et leur mobilité, deux éléments importants de la politique extérieure de l’Union européenne. Le projet de loi vise à faciliter et à simplifier les procédures de mobilité intraeuropéenne des chercheurs et des étudiants qui sont des ressortissants de pays tiers. De plus, certaines modifications comprennent des mécanismes incitatifs pour retenir les étudiants et les chercheurs. À cette fin, il propose que les étudiants et les chercheurs, une fois leurs études ou recherches terminées, puissent se voir délivrer un titre de séjour pour « raisons privées » pour une durée maximum de 9 mois en vue de trouver un emploi ou de créer une entreprise. Enfin, le projet de loi entend réglementer le regroupement familial d’un chercheur séjournant au Luxembourg dans le cadre d’une mobilité à court et à long terme. Le législateur a par ailleurs transposé la Directive 2014/36 sur les travailleurs saisonniers et la Directive 2014/66 sur le transfert temporaire intragroupe en droit national, et a adapté le dispositif de l’immigration aux besoins de l’économie en introduisant entre autres, une autorisation de séjour pour les investisseurs. L’organisation de l’admission du séjour et de la délivrance des autorisations de séjour était également un élément clé de l’Accord entre le Luxembourg et le Cap-Vert relatif à la gestion concertée des flux migratoires et au développement solidaire. L’accord approuvé par la loi du 20 juillet 2017 poursuit en outre les objectifs suivant : promouvoir la mobilité des personnes, lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière, préciser les procédures de réadmission, renforcer l’intégration légale des ressortissants concernés, ainsi que mobiliser les compétences et les ressources des migrants en faveur d’un développement solidaire.
Year 2018
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92 Report

Resilience and acculturation among unaccompanied refugee minors

Year 2018
Journal Name International Journal of Behavioural Development
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93 Journal Article

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors

Authors Julia Huemer, Niranjan S Karnik, Sabine Voelkl-Kernstock, ...
Year 2009
Journal Name Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health
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95 Journal Article

Perspektive der unbegleiteten minderjährigen Ausländer*innen (UMA) in Deutschland

Principal investigator Laura Scholaske (Principal Investigator)
Description
"Die Studie widmet sich dem subjektiven Empfinden der eigenen Lebenssituation von unbegleiteten minderjährigen Geflüchteten und jungen Volljährigen, die zwischen November 2015 und 2019 unbegleitet nach Deutschland eingereist sind und (vorläufig) in Obhut genommen wurden. Unbegleitete Minderjährige sind eine besonders schutzbedürftige Gruppe. Im Januar 2019 waren in Deutschland über 41.000 ausländische Jugendliche und junge Erwachsene in jugendhilferechtlicher Zuständigkeit. Vor dem Hintergrund der Einführung einer bundesweiten Aufnahmepflicht 2015 hat der Gesetzgeber die Bundesregierung verpflichtet, die Wirkungen des Gesetzes zur Verbesserung der Unterbringung, Versorgung und Betreuung unbegleiteter ausländischer Kinder und Jugendlicher zu untersuchen und dem Bundestag bis zum Dezember 2020 über die Ergebnisse zu berichten. Diese Gesetzesevaluation besteht aus drei Teilen, eine davon wird die subjektiven Perspektiven der Kinder und Jugendlichen berücksichtigen. Die Studie untersucht insbesondere die (Un-)Zufriedenheit mit dem Leben und der Gesundheit, mit Bildung und Ausbildung und Interaktionen mit Institutionen in Deutschland (Kinder- und Jugendhilfe) und soziale Netzwerken, sowie die Erwartungen und Zukunftswünsche. Das Mixed-Methods-Design der Studie umfasst eine qualitative Komponente (60 Leitfadeninterviews) sowie eine repräsentative quantitative Komponente (standardisierte Befragung mit 1.000 Interviews, voraussichtlich mit Jugendlichen aus Syrien, Afghanistan, Eritrea und Gambia). Bei der Auswertung der Daten wird unter anderem die Methode der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse angewendet. Befragt werden Jugendliche in vier deutschen Bundesländern: Nordrhein-Westfalen, Bayern, Sachsen und Hamburg. Ethische Standards für die Befragung von minderjährigen Geflüchteten werden besondere Berücksichtigung finden."
Year 2019
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
97 Project
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