Political situation, repression and regime transitions

Political situation, repression, and regime transitions refers to political drivers in sending and receiving countries, such as persecution, political terror and oppression, mandatory military conscription, corruption, democracy, and the right-wing vote share. The security-related political drivers mostly affect asylum and irregular migration while democracy drives young and high-skilled migration.

Studies listed under this migration driver refer to the general political situation, corruption, democracy, right-wing vote share, military service or conscription, and persecution.

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Demoralization-led migration in Bangladesh: A sense of insecurity-based decision-making model

Authors AKM Ahsan Ullah, Ahmed Shafiqul Huque
Year 2020
Journal Name ASIAN JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE POLITICS
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1 Journal Article

The Experiences of Asylum Seekers and Refugees

Authors Anastasia Bermudez
Book Title International Migration, Transnational Politics and Conflict
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2 Book Chapter

Do Tolerant Societies Demand Better Institutions?

Authors Eva Ma Buitrago, Ma Angeles Caraballo, Jose L. Roldan
Year 2019
Journal Name Social indicators research, 2018, OnlineFirst
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3 Journal Article

Does corruption promote emigration? An empirical examination

Authors Arusha Cooray, Friedrich Schneider
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Population Economics
Citations (WoS) 13
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5 Journal Article

Where’s populism? Online media and the diffusion of populist discourses and styles in Portugal

Authors Susana Salgado
Year 2019
Journal Name European Political Science
Citations (WoS) 7
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6 Journal Article

"ON THE ROAD TO RELIGIOUS FREEDOM": A STUDY OF THE NAZARENE EMIGRATION FROM SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE TO THE UNITED STATES

Authors Aleksandra Djuric Milovanovic
Year 2017
Journal Name REVISTA DE ETNOGRAFIE SI FOLCLOR-JOURNAL OF ETHNOGRAPHY AND FOLKLORE
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7 Journal Article

Corruption and the Desire to Leave Quasi-Experimental Evidence on Corruption as a Driver of Emigration Intentions

Authors Daniel Auer, Friederike Römer, Jasper Tjaden
Year 2020
Journal Name IZA Journal of Development and Migration
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8 Journal Article

Freedom of Movement Needs to Be Defended as the Core of EU Citizenship

Authors Floris De Witte
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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10 Book Chapter

THE ASYLUM PROCEDURE IN THE FACE OF PERSECUTION BY ARMED BANDS

Authors Ivana Belk Ruiz-Estramil
Year 2019
Journal Name REVISTA DE DIALECTOLOGIA Y TRADICIONES POPULARES
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11 Journal Article

Protection in Crisis: Forced Migration and Protection in a Global Era

Description
More than 51 million people worldwide are forcibly displaced today as refugees, asylum seekers, or internally displaced persons. According to the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, to be recognized legally as a refugee, an individual must be fleeing persecution on the basis of religion, race, political opinion, nationality, or membership in a particular social group, and must be outside the country of nationality. However, the contemporary drivers of displacement are complex and multilayered, making protection based on a strict definition of persecution increasingly problematic and challenging to implement. Many forced migrants now fall outside the recognized refugee and asylum apparatus. Much displacement today is driven by a combination of intrastate conflict, poor governance and political instability, environmental change, and resource scarcity. These conditions, while falling outside traditionally defined persecution, leave individuals highly vulnerable to danger and uncertain of the future, compelling them to leave their homes in search of greater security. In addition, the blurring of lines between voluntary and forced migration, as seen in mixed migration flows, together with the expansion of irregular migration, further complicates today's global displacement picture. This report details the increasing mismatch between the legal and normative frameworks that define the existing protection regime and the contemporary patterns of forced displacement. It analyzes contemporary drivers and emerging trends of population displacement, noting that the majority of forcibly displaced people – some 33.3 million – remain within their own countries, and that more than 50 percent of the displaced live in urban areas. The author then outlines and assesses key areas where the international protection system is under the most pressure, and finally examines the key implications of these trends for policymakers and the international community, outlining some possible policy directions for reform.
Year 2015
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12 Report

Swiss referendum: flying the flag for nativism

Authors Reem Abu-Hayyeh, Liz Fekete, Graham Murray
Year 2014
Journal Name Race & Class
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13 Journal Article

When Do Migration Aspirations Materialize?

Principal investigator Daniel Auer (Principal Investigator), Marc Helbling (Principal Investigator), Friederike Römer (Principal Investigator), Jasper Tjaden (Principal Investigator)
Description
"(1) Aspirations: In the absence of reliable, internationally available migration flow data necessary for statistical forecasting, policymakers increasingly turn to survey data on emigration intentions to evaluate future migration trends. The important assumption – i.e. that there is a measurable and systematic relationship between the intention to migrate and actual migration – has not been firmly established at the international level. In a first step, we examine the association between estimated population averages of emigration intentions and official migration flow data based on data for more than 160 countries. First results show a strong association between emigration intentions and recorded bilateral flows to industrialized countries, as well as between intentions and aggregated out-migration. The results provide policymakers with a reliability assessment of survey data on emigration intentions and encourage future attempts to incorporate survey data in formal statistical migration forecasting models. (2) Policies: Furthermore, we want to explore to what extent migrants consciously decide to migrate to countries that allow them to improve their economic situation taking into account the difficulties to migrate to this country. In particular, we would like to know how the difficulty to immigrate into a country prevents potential migrants from moving to this country. Might it be that migrants decide to move to more liberal countries to increase the chances to be accepted? We already know that migration flows increase when the destination country is economically more attractive (Borjas 1989; Hatton and Williamson 2003) and decrease when immigration policies are more restrictive (Helbling and Leblang 2018). These effects are to some extent due to rejections during the migration processes when for example visa applications are declined or people are not allowed to enter a country when they arrive at the border. (3) Corruption: Eventually, besides immigration policies in potential destination countries, the formation and subsequent materialization of migration aspirations is determined by various factors in the country of residence. However, there is surprisingly little empirical evidence on factors outside the pure economic sphere. For instance, the link between corruption and emigration has received growing attention. Until now, the evidence claiming a strong relationship relies on individual case studies and correlational analysis which severely limits generalizability. In our study, we apply quasi-experimental methods including instrumental variables and propensity score matching to global survey data on 130 countries over 6 years, covering almost 600’000 individual respondents. We find support for the notion that corruption – systematically and strongly - induces emigration plans across countries, across various model specifications and estimation methods. Strengthening causal claims about the link between corruption and emigration is important for further research in this field. Results are also relevant for policy-makers exploring options to address irregular migration in the context of development and trade agreements. "
Year 2018
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14 Project

From Refuge to Riches? An Analysis of Refugees’ Wage Assimilation in the United States1

Authors Animesh Giri
Year 2018
Journal Name International Migration Review
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15 Journal Article

What Is Wrong with Selling Citizenship? It Corrupts Democracy!

Authors Rainer Bauböck
Book Title Debating transformations of national citizenship
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16 Book Chapter

Refugees and Refugee Protection in the Early Modern Period

Authors Susanne Lachenicht
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Refugee Studies
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17 Journal Article

Reading Too Much and Too Little into the Matter? Latent Limits and Potentials of EU Freedom of Movement

Authors Julija Sardelić
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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18 Book Chapter

Clarifying Survival Migration: A Response

Authors alexander betts
Year 2015
Journal Name European Political Science
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19 Journal Article

Refugees or Migrants? The UNHCR’s Comprehensive Approach to Afghan Mobility into Iran and Pakistan

Authors Giulia Scalettaris
Book Title The Politics of International Migration Management
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20 Book Chapter

Who Ought to Stay? Asylum Policy and Protest Culture in Switzerland

Authors Dina Bader
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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21 Book Chapter

EUmagine

Description
EUMAGINE is a collaborative European research project aimed at investigating the impact of perceptions of human rights and democracy on migration aspirations and decisions. Project description The EUMAGINE project aims to study how Europe is perceived from outside the EU, and how these perceptions affect migration aspirations and decisions. The project focuses on how people’s perceptions on democracy and human rights – in relation to their regions and countries of origin as well as places abroad – affect their perceptions on and attitudes to migration. We are also interested in investigating how perceptions on human rights and democracy interact with other determinants of migration aspirations, to what extent migration is perceived as a valuable life project, and how potential migrants compare Europe to other migration destinations. EUMAGINE studies migration-related perceptions among people aged 18-39 in four countries of origin and transit: Morocco, Senegal, Turkey and Ukraine. Conceptual framework The theoretical starting point for the project is two-fold: First, we assume that different types of discourses on human rights and democracy influence how individuals in countries of origin and transit perceive issues of human rights and democracy. Secondly, we expect that individuals’ perceptions in turn influence their migratory aspirations and decisions. The EUMAGINE project explores two types of imaginations: “migratory imaginations” and “geographical imaginations.” The term “migratory imaginations” refers to people’s attitude to migration as a valuable life project. Migration-related perceptions and aspirations develop within a specific cultural, political-juridical and economic setting, known as the “emigration environment.” Migration aspirations are linked with socially and culturally constructed perceptions. These include ideas and meanings attached to the migration project, subjective images of one’s current environment, and thoughts about potential destinations. We assume that perceptions on human rights and democracy have an impact on what Massey (1998) has termed “cultures of emigration,” where migration becomes deeply rooted into people’s behavioral repertoires. By “geographical imaginations” we refer to the meanings and images that make up people’s subjective conception of particular places, including Europe. We assume that migratory and geographical imaginations are influenced by different types of discourses: macro-level discourses (e.g. from policy and media sources) and meso-level discourses, (e.g. disseminated through popular culture and social networks). We also expect migratory and geographical imaginations to be shaped by individual-level factors, such as gender or age. Research questions The project is informed by five overarching research questions: 1) How are human rights and democracy related to imaginations in migrant sending countries constructed? 2) How are perceptions on human rights, democracy, migration and possible destination countries affected by various factors? 3) How do perceptions on human rights and democracy and ‘geographical imaginations’ relate to migration aspirations and migration? 4) How to develop a better informed migration policy, taking into account human rights and democracy as important migration determinants? 5) How to contribute to local capacity building in source countries, in order to prepare the ground for locally based research initiatives in the future? Methodology The project systematically analyzes migration aspirations and decisions, following a case-study approach: it compares and contrasts a diversity of important international emigration countries; various types of regions within these countries; several modes of migration; various types of influential discourses; and different profiles of potential migrants. This allows the project to make analytical generalizations about how migration-related perceptions, aspirations and decisions are formed. EUMAGINE has a multidisciplinary approach and combines the varied disciplinary background of its researchers: sociology, law, anthropology, economics, human geography and political science. The field research follows a mixed-method approach with three main methodological components: 1) ethnographic fieldwork in the community, 2) a large-scale quantitative survey, and 3) semi-structured qualitative interviews with selected survey respondents, directed by an interview guide. The research uses between- as well as within-method triangulation. Between-method triangulation is reached through combining qualitative as well as quantitative research methodologies. For within-method triangulation, we use two types of qualitative research, namely in-depth interviews and observation in communities. In each country, fieldwork is undertaken in four diverse regions, selected on the basis of the following model: 1) An area characterized by high emigration rates; 2) A second, comparable socio-economic area with low emigration; 3) A comparable area with a strong immigration history; and 4) A location with a specific human rights situation.
Year 2011
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22 Project

From Islamists to Muslim Democrats: The Case of Tunisia’s Ennahda

Authors SHARAN GREWAL
Year 2020
Journal Name American Political Science Review
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23 Journal Article

The Political Economy of Refugee Migration

Authors Mathias Czaika
Year 2009
Journal Name JAHRBUCHER FUR NATIONALOKONOMIE UND STATISTIK
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24 Journal Article

Incremental Changes Are not Enough – Voting Rights Are a Matter of Democratic Principle

Authors Tony Venables
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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25 Book Chapter

El retorno de las migraciones circulares: la regulación de las migraciones profesionales

Authors Antonio Alaminos Chica, Cristina López Fernández, Begoña López Monsalve, ...
Year 2003
Journal Name OBETS. Revista de Ciencias Sociales
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26 Journal Article

The Determinants of Human Trafficking: A US Case Study

Authors Alicja Jac-Kucharski
Year 2012
Journal Name International Migration
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28 Journal Article

Politics and the migration-development nexus: the EU and the Arab SEM countries

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
In the hope of regulating migratory flows, the European Council endorsed a “global approach” to migration in December 2005, an approach which is based on the correction of the “deep causes of migration”: poverty, unemployment and development gaps between North and South. Besides liberalising economies and trade systems, a set of measures are advocated in order to enhance home countries’ development by using “migration [as a] medicine against migration”: stimulating the remittance of funds back to the country of origin; expanding the role of diasporas settled in member states; reinforcing circular migration schemes and facilitating return movements; and improving the management of the emigration of the highly-skilled in order to curb “brain drain”. The paper focuses on the Arab South and East Mediterranean (SEM) countries. It challenges the views, implicit in EU migration policies, that migration is entirely rooted in economics and that migrants’ agency alone is able to spur development in the origin country. Using the theoretical background of political economy with a neo-institutional approach to migration, it explores the stakes, the outreaches and the outcomes of the migration and development nexus. By so doing, it re-politicizes migration and development and emphasises the structural and contextual dimension of factors pushing on migration and hampering development: unemployment and high professional turn over; economic liberalisation and deregulation policies, and socio-political “blockages” (gender inequalities, patronage, clientelism and corruption, lack of public expression). Moreover, the analysis of SEM country practices in the field of migration management and engineering migration for development shows how the design of policies and the channelling of flows respond to political and demographic stakes in the various national contexts. Migration patterns act as a political shield for regimes in the region that: allows these regimes to monitor political opposition; renews socio-cultural elites; and decreases the economic opportunities in national economies, due to corruption and patronage. Current policies also reconstruct state-society/expatriates relations, through (controlled) economic participation and socio-cultural solidarity. They do not, however, lead to political participation. The paper thus concludes that amendments to macro-political contexts in the SEM countries are more likely than liberalisation policies to curb emigration flows, by engineering global social and political development. As a matter of fact, the onset and patterns of the Arab revolutions since December 2010 aptly confirm the need for political reform in the region. Adoptée par le Conseil européen en décembre 2005, l’Approche globale des migrations est axée sur la correction des « causes profondes de la migration » (la pauvreté, le chômage, les écarts de développement entre nord et sud) afin d’en réguler les flux. Parmi les mesures préconisées figurent la facilitation de l’envoi de fonds vers les pays d’origine (transparence des coûts, développement de l’accès aux services financiers), l’encouragement du rôle des diasporas implantées dans les États membres (aider les pays en développement à identifier leur diaspora et à établir des liens), le renforcement de la migration circulaire et la facilitation du retour, une meilleure gestion des migrations de personnes hautement qualifiées afin de limiter la « fuite des cerveaux ». Cette étude traite des pays arabes du sud et de l’est de la Méditerranée (SEM). Elle met en question les représentations, contenues dans les politiques migratoires de l’UE, de la migration comme facteur purement économique, mais aussi des migrants comme agents d’un développement à grande échelle dans leurs pays d’origine. Le cadre théorique de l’économie politique et les approches néo-institutionnelles des migrations, utilisés ici, permettent de dégager les enjeux et la portée du lien entre migration et développement sur le terrain arabe. L’étude ‘re-politise’ ces deux processus. Elle met en relief la dimension structurelle des facteurs déclenchant l’émigration et entravant les processus de développement : les caractéristiques du marché du travail, les politiques de libéralisation des économies et les « blocages » sociopolitiques (inégalités hommes-femmes, clientélisme et corruption, obstacles à l’expression publique). En outre, l’analyse des politiques migratoires menées dans les pays du SEM montre que ces mesures répondent aux enjeux politiques et démographiques particuliers aux divers contextes nationaux de la région. Elles permettent aux régimes en place de contrôler l’opposition politique, le renouvellement des élites socioculturelles et les conséquences de la contraction des opportunités économiques, due à la corruption et au clientélisme. Les politiques migratoires participent également d’une restructuration des relations États-sociétés-expatriés autour d’une participation économique (étroitement contrôlée) et d’une solidarité socioculturelle, mais excluant toute participation politique. L’étude conclut donc que des réformes des contextes sociaux et politiques dans les pays du SEM seraient plus à même d’agir sur les flux migratoires que les réformes néolibérales. Le déclenchement des révoltes arabes en décembre 2010 confirme d’ailleurs l’urgence de ces réformes politiques.
Year 2011
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29 Report

Political Trust as Modest Expectations: Exploring Immigrants’ Falling Confidence in Swedish Political Institutions

Authors Per Adman, Per Strömblad
Year 2015
Journal Name Nordic Journal of Migration Research
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30 Journal Article

Politics and the migration-development nexus: the EU and the Arab SEM countries

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
In the hope of regulating migratory flows, the European Council endorsed a “global approach” to migration in December 2005, an approach which is based on the correction of the “deep causes of migration”: poverty, unemployment and development gaps between North and South. Besides liberalising economies and trade systems, a set of measures are advocated in order to enhance home countries’ development by using “migration [as a] medicine against migration”: stimulating the remittance of funds back to the country of origin; expanding the role of diasporas settled in member states; reinforcing circular migration schemes and facilitating return movements; and improving the management of the emigration of the highly-skilled in order to curb “brain drain”. The paper focuses on the Arab South and East Mediterranean (SEM) countries. It challenges the views, implicit in EU migration policies, that migration is entirely rooted in economics and that migrants’ agency alone is able to spur development in the origin country. Using the theoretical background of political economy with a neo-institutional approach to migration, it explores the stakes, the outreaches and the outcomes of the migration and development nexus. By so doing, it re-politicizes migration and development and emphasises the structural and contextual dimension of factors pushing on migration and hampering development: unemployment and high professional turn over; economic liberalisation and deregulation policies, and socio-political “blockages” (gender inequalities, patronage, clientelism and corruption, lack of public expression). Moreover, the analysis of SEM country practices in the field of migration management and engineering migration for development shows how the design of policies and the channelling of flows respond to political and demographic stakes in the various national contexts. Migration patterns act as a political shield for regimes in the region that: allows these regimes to monitor political opposition; renews socio-cultural elites; and decreases the economic opportunities in national economies, due to corruption and patronage. Current policies also reconstruct state-society/expatriates relations, through (controlled) economic participation and socio-cultural solidarity. They do not, however, lead to political participation. The paper thus concludes that amendments to macro-political contexts in the SEM countries are more likely than liberalisation policies to curb emigration flows, by engineering global social and political development. As a matter of fact, the onset and patterns of the Arab revolutions since December 2010 aptly confirm the need for political reform in the region. Adoptée par le Conseil européen en décembre 2005, l’Approche globale des migrations est axée sur la correction des « causes profondes de la migration » (la pauvreté, le chômage, les écarts de développement entre nord et sud) afin d’en réguler les flux. Parmi les mesures préconisées figurent la facilitation de l’envoi de fonds vers les pays d’origine (transparence des coûts, développement de l’accès aux services financiers), l’encouragement du rôle des diasporas implantées dans les États membres (aider les pays en développement à identifier leur diaspora et à établir des liens), le renforcement de la migration circulaire et la facilitation du retour, une meilleure gestion des migrations de personnes hautement qualifiées afin de limiter la « fuite des cerveaux ». Cette étude traite des pays arabes du sud et de l’est de la Méditerranée (SEM). Elle met en question les représentations, contenues dans les politiques migratoires de l’UE, de la migration comme facteur purement économique, mais aussi des migrants comme agents d’un développement à grande échelle dans leurs pays d’origine. Le cadre théorique de l’économie politique et les approches néo-institutionnelles des migrations, utilisés ici, permettent de dégager les enjeux et la portée du lien entre migration et développement sur le terrain arabe. L’étude ‘re-politise’ ces deux processus. Elle met en relief la dimension structurelle des facteurs déclenchant l’émigration et entravant les processus de développement : les caractéristiques du marché du travail, les politiques de libéralisation des économies et les « blocages » sociopolitiques (inégalités hommes-femmes, clientélisme et corruption, obstacles à l’expression publique). En outre, l’analyse des politiques migratoires menées dans les pays du SEM montre que ces mesures répondent aux enjeux politiques et démographiques particuliers aux divers contextes nationaux de la région. Elles permettent aux régimes en place de contrôler l’opposition politique, le renouvellement des élites socioculturelles et les conséquences de la contraction des opportunités économiques, due à la corruption et au clientélisme. Les politiques migratoires participent également d’une restructuration des relations États-sociétés-expatriés autour d’une participation économique (étroitement contrôlée) et d’une solidarité socioculturelle, mais excluant toute participation politique. L’étude conclut donc que des réformes des contextes sociaux et politiques dans les pays du SEM seraient plus à même d’agir sur les flux migratoires que les réformes néolibérales. Le déclenchement des révoltes arabes en décembre 2010 confirme d’ailleurs l’urgence de ces réformes politiques.
Year 2011
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31 Report

Determinants of migration and the gravity model of migration - application on Western Balkan emigration flows

Authors Visar Malaj, Stefano de Rubertis
Year 2017
Journal Name Migration Letters
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32 Journal Article

Deportation Stigma and Re-migration

Authors Liza Schuster, Nassim Majidi
Year 2015
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 40
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33 Journal Article

Foreigners, citizens and the tyrannical edges of the 'Vox Populi' : empirical and normative evidence from Switzerland

Authors Jean-Thomas ARRIGHI, Universitat Pompeu Fabra : Departament de Ciències Polítiques i Socials
Year 2017
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34 Working Paper

Migrants and Refugees at the Borders of Europe: Qualifying through Suffering, Bare Life and Paradoxical Agency

Authors Estela Schindel
Year 2017
Journal Name REVISTA DE ESTUDIOS SOCIALES
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35 Journal Article

Can we put an end to human smuggling?

Authors Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Year 2015
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36 Policy Brief

Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities across the Nation

Authors Melina Juárez, Bárbara Gómez-Aguiñaga, Sonia P. Bettez
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal on Migration and Human Security
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37 Journal Article

On the Causes and Significance of the December 2008 Social Explosion in Greece

Authors Spyros Sakellaropoulos
Year 2012
Journal Name SCIENCE & SOCIETY
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38 Journal Article

Protest Against the Reception of Asylum Seekers in Austria

Authors Sieglinde Rosenberger, Miriam Haselbacher
Book Title Protest Movements in Asylum and Deportation
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39 Book Chapter

Perspectives on Human Trafficking and Modern Forms of Slavery

Authors Siddharth Kara
Year 2015
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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41 Journal Article

Neville Laski, Anglo-Jewry and the crises of the 1930s

Authors Daniel Tilles
Year 2019
Journal Name Patterns of Prejudice
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42 Journal Article

The 2016 EU Referendum: Explaining Support for Brexit Among Would-Be British MPs

Authors Siim Trumm, Caitlin Milazzo, Joshua Townsley
Year 2020
Journal Name Political Studies
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43 Journal Article

Penalizing democracy: punitive politics in neoliberal Mexico

Authors Markus-Michael Mueller
Year 2016
Journal Name Crime, Law & Social Change
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44 Journal Article

POLITICAL UPHEAVALS IN THE ARAB WORLD: INSTABILITIES AND MIGRANTS INFLUX TO THE WESTERN BALKANS

Authors Jelisaveta Blagojevic, Radenko Scekic
Year 2017
Journal Name ANNALES-ANALI ZA ISTRSKE IN MEDITERANSKE STUDIJE-SERIES HISTORIA ET SOCIOLOGIA
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45 Journal Article

Looking beyond the state: transitional justice and the Kurdish issue in Turkey

Authors Joost Jongerden
Year 2018
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 1
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46 Journal Article

The Emotional Impacts of Working as an Asylum Lawyer

Authors Neil Graffin
Year 2019
Journal Name Refugee Survey Quarterly
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47 Journal Article

Understanding refugee durable solutions by international players: Does dialogue form a missing link?

Authors Fred Bidandi
Year 2018
Journal Name COGENT SOCIAL SCIENCES
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48 Journal Article

When the Export of Social Problems Is No Longer Possible: Immigration Policies and Unemployment in Switzerland

Authors Alexandre Afonso
Year 2005
Journal Name Social Policy & Administration
Citations (WoS) 10
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49 Journal Article

"Smenovekhovtsy" Movement and Realities of Soviet Society of 1920-ies

Authors Vyacheslav Nikolayevich Azarov
Year 2018
Journal Name NAUCHNYI DIALOG
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50 Journal Article

What counts as racist immigration policy?

Authors Cybelle Fox
Year 2015
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
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51 Journal Article

Common Dynamics of Identity and Immigration: The Roles of Mobility and Democracy

Authors Nicolas Houy
Year 2019
Journal Name JASSS-THE JOURNAL OF ARTIFICIAL SOCIETIES AND SOCIAL SIMULATION
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53 Journal Article

Introduction: Immigration in Ireland and Migrant-Led Activism

Authors Ronit Lentin
Book Title Migrant Activism and Integration from Below in Ireland
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54 Book Chapter

Socio-economic Determinants for the Portuguese Immigration: An Empirical Discussion

Authors Paulo Reis Mourao
Year 2016
Journal Name Social indicators research, 2018, OnlineFirst
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55 Journal Article

Do Migrants Get Involved in Politics? Levels, Forms and Drivers of Migrant Political Participation in Italy

Authors Livia Ortensi, Veronica Riniolo
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION
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56 Journal Article

Religious and Social Reflections of the Migration: In the Context of Quranic References

Authors Ihsan Capcioglu, Mehmet Akin, Niyazi Akyuz
Year 2018
Journal Name TARIH KULTUR VE SANAT ARASTIRMALARI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF HISTORY CULTURE AND ART RESEARCH
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57 Journal Article

Why Black and Latino Home Ownership Matter to the Color Line and Multiracial Democracy

Authors Jacob S. Rugh
Year 2020
Journal Name RACE AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS
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58 Journal Article

Immigration, Politics and Democracy: The World Jewish Congress in Europe, 1936-1939

Authors Zohar Segev
Year 2017
Journal Name Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism
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59 Journal Article

Democracy in private government (a case study of the International Typographical Union)

Authors Seymour M. Lipset
Year 2010
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
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60 Journal Article

We are family? governance and the prospects for instability in Europe

Authors Shana Buchanan McLean
Year 2014
Journal Name EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF FUTURES RESEARCH
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61 Journal Article

Central Europe as a space of transnational migration

Authors Max Haller, Roland Verwiebe
Year 2016
Journal Name Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie
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62 Journal Article

Sexual politics, torture, and secular time

Authors Judith Butler
Year 2008
Journal Name The British Journal of Sociology
Citations (WoS) 208
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64 Journal Article

Western Political Rhetoric and Radicalization

Authors William O'Brochta, Margit Tavits, Deniz Aksoy
Year 2020
Journal Name British Journal of Political Science
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65 Journal Article

Pious Policymaking The Participatory Satires of Stephen Colbert

Authors Marcus Paroske
Year 2016
Journal Name STUDIES IN AMERICAN HUMOR
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66 Journal Article

Germany at the Crossroads: National Identity and the Challenges of Immigration

Authors Hermann Kurthen
Year 1995
Journal Name International Migration Review
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67 Journal Article

Germany at the Crossroads: National Identity and the Challenges of Immigration

Authors Hermann Kurthen
Year 1995
Journal Name International Migration Review
Citations (WoS) 24
Taxonomy View Taxonomy Associations
68 Journal Article

Bulgaria’s Response to Refugee Migration: Institutionalizing the Boundary of Exclusion

Authors Nevena Nancheva
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of Refugee Studies
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69 Journal Article

Between global dreams and national duties: the dilemma of conscription duty in the transnational lives of young Korean males

Authors Kirsten Younghee Song
Year 2015
Journal Name Global Networks
Citations (WoS) 2
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70 Journal Article

The plights of Eritrean refugees in the Shimelba Refugee Camp, Ethiopia

Authors Natnael Terefe Arega
Year 2017
Journal Name International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
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73 Journal Article

How the Box Became Black: Brokers and the Creation of the Free Migrant

Authors Adam McKeown
Year 2012
Journal Name PACIFIC AFFAIRS
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74 Journal Article

The anti-tobacco movement in the Progressive Era: A case study of direct democracy in Oregon

Authors John Dinan, JC Heckelman
Year 2005
Journal Name EXPLORATIONS IN ECONOMIC HISTORY
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76 Journal Article

What’s in a People? Social Facts, Individual Choice, and the European Union

Authors Dimitry Kochenov
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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77 Book Chapter

The quest for the legitimacy of the people: A contractarian approach

Authors Marco Verschoor
Year 2015
Journal Name POLITICS PHILOSOPHY & ECONOMICS
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78 Journal Article

Arab Society in Revolt: The West's Mediterranean Challenge

Authors Cesare MERLINI, Olivier ROY
Year 2012
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79 Book

Investigating the interactions between civil wars and migration.

Description
Poor countries are often plagued by civil wars. They are also, in many cases, emigration countries. Anybody interested in the development of such countries must understand to what extent these phenomena are interrelated, and how they interplay with each other. If it is pretty clear that civil wars push people to leave the country, it remains understudied how diasporas play a role in the emergence and evolution of violent conflicts. Indeed, the interactions between diasporas and conflict have roughly been overlooked by the economic literature to date, in spite of the very suggestive pieces of evidence provided by related research fields and of the very important policy questions that it raises – in particular, how to optimize the contribution of diasporas to peaceful development. Based on case studies such as those of Erytrea or of Sri Lanka, the literature in history and political science underlines diverse mechanisms through which diasporas have intervened in the evolution of violence in their home country, either as peace-builders or as peace-wreckers. On the other hand, in these case studies, the evolution of civil wars also appears to have been determinant of emigration and return migration patterns and, eventually, of the nature of diasporas’ involvement in the political situation in the homeland. This project will investigate the joint dynamics of civil conflicts and migration in developing countries. It will first build a theoretical framework to characterize how diasporas and civil wars interact together, accounting for the endogeneity of both migration and violence. The theoretical predictions derived from this framework will then be empirically tested, relying on recent and original data. Through a multi-disciplinary perspective, nourished by the findings of the qualitative research and relying on economic tools – both theoretical and empirical – this project will allow to build the first comprehensive investigation of the diasporas – conflict nexus.
Year 2015
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80 Project

Does Trust Mean the Same for Migrants and Natives? Testing Measurement Models of Political Trust with Multi-group Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Authors Stefanie Andre
Year 2014
Journal Name Social indicators research, 2018, OnlineFirst
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81 Journal Article

Ethnic Diversity and Social Cohesion

Authors Merlin Schaeffer
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82 Book

Main trends in development of migration policy in Ukraine

Authors Iryna Sakharuk, Svitlana Batychenko, Olena Derii, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name AMAZONIA INVESTIGA
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83 Journal Article

Whose Bad Guys Are Terrorists?

Authors Rainer Bauböck
Book Title Debating transformations of national citizenship
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84 Book Chapter

Poland’s Perspective on the Intra-European Movement of Poles. Implications and Governance Responses

Authors Marta Kindler
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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85 Book Chapter

A Crisis of Social Recognition? Findings from a Population Survey on Everyday-Life Experiences of Appreciation and Disrespect in Germany

Authors Christian Schneickert, J Delhey, Leonie C. Steckermeier
Year 2019
Journal Name KOLNER ZEITSCHRIFT FUR SOZIOLOGIE UND SOZIALPSYCHOLOGIE
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86 Journal Article

Consequences of Intra-European Movement for CEE Migrants in European Urban Regions

Authors Ursula Reeger
Book Title Between Mobility and Migration
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87 Book Chapter

‘Does the Girl Think of Nothing but Food?’

Authors Antoinette Pretorius
Year 2015
Journal Name Food, Culture & Society
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88 Journal Article

The Push and Pull Factors Contributing Towards Asylum Migration from Developing Countries to Developed Countries Since 2000

Authors Nozomi Matsui, James Raymer
Year 2020
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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89 Journal Article

The increasing use of detention of asylum seekers and irregular migrants in the EU

Authors Carmine Conte, Valentina Savazzi, Migration Policy Group (MPG)
Year 2019
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91 Policy Brief

The limits of freedom: migration as a space of freedom and loneliness among Afghan unaccompanied migrant youth

Authors Francesca Meloni
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 4
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92 Journal Article

When Political Freedom Does Not Offer Travel Freedom: The Varying Determinants of Visa‐Free Travel Opportunities

Authors Jacob Thomas
Year 2020
Journal Name International Migration
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93 Journal Article

Regulatory migration regimes and the production of space: The case of Nepalese workers in South Korea

Authors Seonyoung Seo, Tracey Skelton
Year 2017
Journal Name Geoforum
Citations (WoS) 10
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95 Journal Article

EU Citizenship, Free Movement and Emancipation: A Rejoinder

Authors Floris De Witte
Book Title Debating European citizenship
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96 Book Chapter

You are Not Welcome Here Anymore: Restoring Support for Refugee Resettlement in the Age of Trump

Authors Todd Scribner
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal on Migration and Human Security
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98 Journal Article

Determinants of ‘Mobilisation’ at Home and Abroad: Analysing the Micro-Foundations of Out-Migration & Mass Protest

Principal investigator Sorana Toma (Principal Investigator)
Description
Le projet MOBILISE demande: Quand mécontents avec le situation economique ou politiquoi, pourquoi certains individus protestent tandis que d'autres quittent les frontieres? En reliant les intuitions théoriques de la littérature sur la migration internationale et de celle sur les mobilisations collectives, nous examinons a) Si des facteurs similaires soustentend le choix de migrer et/ou de protester au niveau individuel b) Comment le contexte influence ces mobilisations c) Dans quelle mesure ces choix sont-ils independants l'un de l'autre ou ils se renforcent / se découragent l'un l'autre. MOBILISE utilise une methodologie mixte (des enquêtes quantitatives representatives au niveau national, des enquêtes en ligne auprés des migrants, des enquêtes auprès des protestataires, des focus groups, des entretiens retrospectifs et de l'analyse des réseaux sociaux) ainsi qu'un design multi-situé. Le projet couvre l'Ukraine, la Pologne, le Maroc et le Bresil, qui ont tous récemment connu des protestations de masse ainsi qu'une forte émigration. Nous suivons des emigrés de ces pays en Allemagne, la Grande Bretagne et l'Espagne. Le projet offre quatre innovations clés 1) Il combine les protestations et la migration 2) Il capture tous les groupes pertinents pour la comparaison (des protestataires, des migrants, des migrants protestataires et des individus qui ne font ni l'un ni l'autre) 3) Il suit des individus au fil du temps en utilisant des methodes de panel 4) Il inclut dans l'analyse l'utilisation des réseaux sociaux en fournissant de l'information sur le role des réseaux et des transferts politiques en temps réel. Ces innovations nous permettent d'apporter une contribution importante au développement théorique autant dans l'étude des migrations que des protestations. De plus, le projet fournit des connaissances centrales aux hommes politiques sur les facteurs qui influencent la stabilité politique et économique.
Year 2019
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99 Project

(Re) Moving borders: North African clandestine emigrant in the age of terror

Authors Mustapha Hamil
Year 2017
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
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100 Journal Article
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