Comparative

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A Local Dimension of Integration Policies? A Comparative Study of Berlin, Malmo, and Rotterdam

Authors Rianne Dekker, Peter Scholten, Henrik Emilsson, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name International Migration Review
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1 Journal Article

Institutional Habitus and Educational Achievement: A Comparative Case Study in Germany and Turkey

Description
The educational achievement of students from working-class ethnic minority or immigrant back-grounds is vitally important for their integration into the labor market and society. We know from research that their disadvantaged family back-ground, such as low parental education and income, significantly influences these students’ academic achievement. However, as students increasingly spend most of their time in school contexts, school has also become one of the key factors for under-standing educational performance. In this context, interactions of specific school regulations, practices, and structures with the skills, values, and cultures of students can greatly contribute to the development of educational policies for reforming schools in a way that would increase the educational achieve-ment of students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This study conceptualizes school-related factors as institutional habitus and seeks to understand how schools’ institutional habitus accommodate students from different ethnic and minority back-grounds for making empirical contributions to the development of inclusive and intercultural school structures. This report is based on a comparative study that investigates the components of the institutional habitus of two different schools, one in Turkey and one in Germany, and how they influence the educa-tional performance of children from working-class Kurdish ethnic minority backgrounds in Turkey and working-class Turkish immigrant backgrounds in Germany. This exploratory, qualitative study included interviews with teachers, students, school principals, and experts in the field of education, as well as participatory observations in the classroom and beyond.
Year 2017
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2 Report

Study on Airport Asylum Procedures at European Airports

Principal investigator Martin Wagner (Project Coordinator)
Description
The Swiss Federal Office for Migration (BFM) has commissioned the ICMPD to undertake a comparative study of asylum procedures at seven European airports - Zürich, Brussels, Frankfurt a.M., London-Heathrow, Vienna, Paris-Roissy and Schiphol. Objectives • To provide an overview of the legal and practical framework and methods applied in the selected airports • To enable the BMF to put the Swiss policies into a European perspective • To design better and more rational airport asylum procedures Outcomes Comparative analysis of: • Asylum procedure at the airport • Accommodation of asylum seekers during the procedure in the transit zone • Deportation and securing The study includes elements of field research (qualitative interviews with governmental, non-governmental and international organisations involved as well as visitation of the respective premises at the airport) and desk research (examination of legal texts, literature and relevant statistics).
Year 2008
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3 Project

La inmigración brasileña en Portugal y España: ¿sistema migratorio ibérico?

Authors Beatriz Padilla, Erika Masanet Ripoll
Year 2010
Journal Name OBETS. Revista de Ciencias Sociales
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4 Journal Article

Refugee resettlement in the EU : 2011-2013 report

Authors Delphine PERRIN
Description
Know Reset aimed at conducting a systematic inventory of resettlement frameworks and practices in the EU, providing a comparative analysis and assessment of resettlement in the Member States, evaluating their resettlement capacity while addressing policy recommendations to the EU and its Member States in order to enhance cooperation and improve resettlement activities. To better understand Member States’ decision-making and better explore the potential for developing resettlement capacity in the EU, the Project has covered the 27 EU Member States whatever the nature and degree of their involvement in refugee resettlement. Unique field research has also been conducted in three major countries of first asylum (Kenya, Pakistan, Tunisia) by external experts hired for the Project, who dedicated their observation and analysis on EU Member States resettlement practices in the pre-departure phase. The Final Report compiles various deliverables of the Know Reset Project: a series of tables and graphs for quantitative and qualitative country comparison, 27 "Resettlement Country Profiles", 3 Country of First Asylum Reports and 2 EU Comparative Reports.
Year 2013
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5 Report

The information mapping board game: a collaborative investigation of asylum seekers and refugees’ information practices in England, UK

Authors Kahina Le Louvier, Perla Innocenti
Year 2019
Journal Name Information Research
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8 Journal Article

Entrepreneurial Chinese Migrants and Petty African Entrepreneurs: Local Impacts of Interaction in Urban West Africa (Ghana and Senegal)

Principal investigator Karsten Giese (Principal Investigator ), Laurence Marfaing (Principal Investigator )
Description
Research Questions Where do Chinese migrant entrepreneurs come from and why do they migrate? Where do they settle, and how do they organize their economic and social activities? How are they perceived by local and migrant African entrepreneurs in their host country? Does this perception correspond to the discourse of cooperation propagated by the Chinese and African governments? How does the Chinese presence influence the development of African host societies? Contribution to International Research This comparative study on the Chinese migration into two West African countries explores the economic and political processes triggered by the Chinese migration. It analyses the interactions of the local population with the Chinese migrant entrepreneurs as well as the former’s innovative reactions toward the strategies and practices of the latter. The combination of the different regional research capacities at the GIGA within one research team allows us to address this multidimensional research problem with adequate regional and multidisciplinary competences and research strategies. Research Design and Methods Our research field is characterized by high degrees of informality, especially regarding migratory paths, residence status, economic activities, social organization and the political action of all actors involved. In view of this, existing quantitative data on the micro- and meso-levels could not be taken as a reliable basis for our analyses. Moreover, the economic interests that characterize our field had the effect of reduced acceptance on the part of our informants of standardized instruments such as questionnaires. For these reasons, our research concentrates on coordinated qualitative comparative case studies within and across Ghana and Senegal in order to produce reliable research findings. In accordance with our research questions, qualitative data collection was conducted on a micro-level, drawing on the method of actor-centred participant observation and its adaptations in narrative interviews. Additional semi-structured interviews were conducted to ensure comparability across cases. In addition, visual ethnographic methods were applied (photo essays, network-mapping) as a basis for joint interpretation in the overarching research context. Preliminary Results We had assumed that networks formed the dominant model of social organization for both the African and the Chinese actors and groups we studied, and that networks were the key factors to understanding the interaction between these two groups. In the field, however, we were unable to establish any empirical evidence that the Chinese individual economic sojourners (or small groups forming family-owned businesses), whose business models tend to be highly speculative, are engaging in any form of meaningful social and economic interaction with their African counterparts beyond primarily functional and opportunistic buyer–seller or employer–employee relationships. African traders also did not reveal any stronger motivation to open their networks to their Chinese counterparts. Based on our observations, we conclude that a wide range of African actors engages in innovative practices not through social exchange and mutually beneficial cooperation with the Chinese newcomers but by creatively appropriating the unintended opportunities that Chinese actors provide in the local African settings through their distinct social and economic practices. However, the significations that are inscribed into the diverse Chinese social and economic practices and the stimuli they represent are contested between diverse African actors, since their social and economic positioning, their interests and interpretations, and their capacities for adaptation differ greatly. The Chinese business strategy of large-scale wholesale trading in combination with the low cost of the commodities they sell has facilitated the engagement of larger social strata with limited financial means in trading activities. These changes in market access, not least, have had a profound impact on Senegalese and Ghanaian market orders. Not surprisingly, many of the new traders whose access to this profession has directly benefited from the Chinese presence also closely observe the latter’s business strategies. All interviewed Chinese traders, for instance, unanimously employed the logic of high turnovers at small profit rates, aspiring to maximize incomes through sheer volume. Once the African traders have realized that trading in Chinese goods provides solid opportunities for capital accumulation and growth, they have turned their gaze toward China as source for their commodities.
Year 2011
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9 Project

Framing the Immigration Policy Agenda

Authors Rianne Dekker, Peter Scholten
Year 2017
Journal Name The International Journal of Press/Politics
Citations (WoS) 8
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11 Journal Article

Mapping the Qualitative Migration Research in Europe: An Exploratory Analysis

Authors Ricard Zapata-Barrero, Evren Yalaz
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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14 Book Chapter

NEUJOBS

Description
The objective of NEUJOBS is to imagine future, or rather various possible futures, under the conditions of the socioecological transition (and incorporating other key influences), map the implications for employment overall, but also in key sectors and relevant groups and integrate all of this together under a single intellectual framework. It will do so by combining EU-wide studies based on existing datasets with small-N comparative research dealing with one or more countries. Furthermore, the output will be a mix of quantitative and qualitative analysis, foresight activities and policy analysis.
Year 2011
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15 Project

Context-Based Qualitative Research and Multi-sited Migration Studies in Europe

Authors Russell King
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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16 Book Chapter

Zuwanderung, Figuration, Konflikt: Eine vergleichende sozialraumbezogene Analyse in Bradford und Duisburg

Principal investigator Wilhelm Heitmeyer (Principal Investigator), Jörg Hüttermann (Principal Investigator)
Description
Das Forschungsvorhaben soll sich als vergleichende sozialraumbezogene Studie mit dem Wandel der Gruppenbeziehungen zwischen Zuwanderern und Alteingesessenen in Duisburg-Marxloh und Bradford-Manningham befassen, die beide Schauplatz von Intergruppenkonflikten zwischen Einwanderern und Alteingesessenen waren. Methodisch setzt es mit den Mitteln der qualitativen Feldforschung an. Das wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisinteresse ist ein Doppeltes: Zum einen sollen die Studien in den beiden mittelgroßen ehemaligen Industriestädten die Herausbildung und den Wandel der Gruppenfigurationen im Verhältnis von Zuwanderern und Alteingesessenen seit Mitte der 50er Jahre rekonstruieren. Zum anderen soll der Vergleich der Figurationsprozesse zur Beantwortung der Fragen beitragen, warum es in Bradford wiederholt zu gewaltförmigen Gruppenkonflikten bzw. zu riots kam, und warum die grundsätzlich auch in Duisburg zu beobachtenden Gruppenkonflikte (z. B. der Gebetsrufkonflikt) trotz einiger, den lokalen Kontext betreffender Parallelen in z. B. ökonomischer, demographischer und sozialstruktureller Hinsicht bislang nicht gewaltsam eskaliert sind. Das praktisch-politische Erkenntnisinteresse der vergleichenden Analyse zielt auf die Beantwortung der Fragen, wer wo und wie ansetzen sollte, um gewaltförmigen Gruppenkonflikten in den zugrunde liegenden Konstellationen vorzubeugen.
Year 2009
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17 Project

Schools and Refugee Children: The Case of Syrians in Turkey

Authors Cetin Celik, Ahmet Icduygu
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration
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18 Journal Article

Ethnic Diversity, Social Trust and Civic Engagement

Principal investigator Ruud Koopmans (Principal Investigator)
Description
Many studies have demonstrated a negative correlation between cultural diversity and trust and cooperation, but they have left the question of the causal nature of this relationship largely open, and the mechanisms behind it unexplored. This large project was intended to fill some of these gaps by conducting a comparative analysis across three countries, across cities, and in the context of schools, using both survey and experimental data. The "Ethnic Diversity and Collective Action Survey" (EDCAS; see Schaeffer et al. 2011 for the technical report) was conducted across local populations in 67 cities and towns in Germany, France, and the Netherlands with a total sample size of 9100 respondents. The survey especially focused on neighbourhood trust and other measures of social cohesion, as well as interethnic networks and civic engagement. We also conducted a survey of parents of children in Berlin primary schools. In both surveys, experiments were integrated – priming experiments in both the German EDCAS and the school survey, and a cooperation game in the school survey. In Berlin, we also conducted a field experiment on cooperative behavior in which we investigated the return rates of letters that were apparently lost on the pavement. Two dissertations were completed on the basis of the project, both graded with highest honours (Schaeffer 2014; Veit 2014). The various experiments make a key contribution by providing consistent and strong evidence that ethnic diversity challenges cooperation. The two priming experiments (Koopmans & Veit 2014; Veit 2015) demonstrate that raising the salience of ethnic diversity leads to more negative judgments of cooperation, both with regard to peoples’ trust in their fellow neighbors to return a lost wallet, and with regard to parents’ judgments of parental cooperation at school. Raising the salience of diversity in age or income, by contrast, has no such effect. The cooperation experiment (see Veit 2014a) reveals less successful coordination of efforts to produce a public good among parents in more diverse schools and classrooms. The lost-letter field experiment (Koopmans & Veit 2014b), finally, demonstrated that return rates of letters are lower in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods, controlling for other neighbourhood characteristics. This experiment also tests the most-often proposed mechanism behind reduced cooperation in diverse contexts: in-group favouritism. We find no evidence for this mechanism because letters are returned more often from homogenous neighbourhoods dominated by native ethnics regardless of whether the addressee is German, Christian, Muslim, or Turkish. By contrast, all letters are returned less often from more diverse neighbourhoods where many Turks and Muslims live. Results of the EDCAS survey confirm the negative relationship between diversity and trust, as well as collective efficacy, and experienced neighbourhood social problems. They also provide further insight into the mechanisms behind this relationship. In one study (Koopmans & Schaeffer 2015a) we focus on perceptions of the quantity and various aspects of the qualitative nature of diversity and test three explanations that have been proposed in the literature for negative diversity effects: out-group biases, asymmetric preferences and coordination problems. We show that all three mechanisms matter. Another study shows that children and interethnic partnerships act as brokers of interethnic contacts that mitigate negative diversity effects (Schaeffer 2013a). Finally, the project made significant contributions to the theoretically adequate measurement of diversity (Schaeffer 2013b; Koopmans & Schaeffer 2015b). In the context of the project a large international conference on “Ethnic diversity and social capital: Mechanisms, conditions, and causality” was organized in 2013. A selection of papers was recently published as an edited volume (Koopmans, Lancee & Schaeffer 2015).
Year 2008
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19 Project

Structural framework conditions and individual motivations for youth-mobility: A macro-micro level approach for different European country-types

Authors Karen Hemming, Tabea Schlimbach, Frank Tillmann, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Migration Letters
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21 Journal Article

Community-Based Microtrade in Support of Small-Scale Farmers in Thailand and Tanzania

Authors Andreas Neef, Kei Mizuno, Iven Schad, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name Law and Development Review
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22 Journal Article

Feasibility study on the labour market performance of regularised migrants in Europe

Description
The regularisation of irregular immigrants remains one of the main controversial policy options in regard to policies towards irregular migrants. While there is an increasing realisation that in some contexts regularisation may be an appropriate and necessary response to the sustained presence of irregular migrants, notably in humanitarian cases such as migrants who cannot be returned or who have family or other strong ties to their country of residence, opposition against regularisation remains strong, often based on principled considerations. However, very little is still known about wider impacts of regularisation, and in particular the impact of regularisation on those regularised. Objectives: The objectives of this feasibility study are threefold: • To determine the feasibility of conducting a comparative survey on the labour market performance of regularised immigrants in seven European countries; • To identify the best design for an empirical study of the labour market performance of regularised and irregular migrants and prepare draft tools for an implementation of the survey; • To provide tentative results on labour market trajectories of regularised migrants on the basis of exploratory qualitative research conducted in the course of the feasibility study. An earlier study conducted by ICMPD between 2007 and 2009 ( “Regularisations in Europe”, REGINE) had identified the overall extent of regularisation, the different forms, rationales and target groups of regularisation, while linking regularisation to the complex causes of irregularity, differing patterns of irregular migration and different overall policy responses to irregular migration across the EU. Yet as a study largely based on desk research and limited primary data collection amongst public authorities and other stakeholders, the study was unable to provide robust evidence regarding the wider impacts of regularisation, including the impact of regularisation on labour market trajectories of regularised migrants. The REGANE study sets out to address this gap. In its feasibility study phase, the study has three aims. First, it will assess the feasibility of conducting a quantitative survey amongst regularised and non-regularised migrants in 7 European countries; second, it will explore the best design for a quantitative empirical study of labour market trajectories of regularised migrants; and third it will undertake explorative qualitative research involving research with relevant experts, public authorities and migrants, thus not only preparing the ground for the implementation of the quantitative survey but also providing preliminary results regarding labour market trajectories of regularised migrants. The quantitative survey prepared through this feasibility study itself is planned to be implemented in a second phase of the project. It expected to provide the first systematic comparative assessment of individual level impacts of regularisation on those regularised in Europe.
Year 2012
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23 Project

A theory of international organization

Authors Liesbet HOOGHE, Tobias LENZ, Gary MARKS
Year 2019
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24 Book

Migration and Fertility. Polish Migrant Families in Ireland and Non-Migrant Families in Poland: A Comparison of Fertility Plans and Behaviour

Authors Łukasz Klimek
Year 2017
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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25 Journal Article

Architekturen des Asyls: Aneignungsprozesse in Flüchtlingsunterkünften

Principal investigator Philipp Misselwitz (Principal Investigator)
Description
Auf Basis architektur- und sozialwissenschaftlicher Methoden untersucht das Forschungsprojekt die physisch-materiellen und symbolischen Aneignungsprozesse von geflüchteten Menschen an unterschiedlichen Asylorten. Damit rückt es das handlungsrelevante Raumwissen in einer hochmobilen Ausnahmesituation (Flucht) in den Mittelpunkt. Empirisch ist die Studie so angelegt, dass syrische Geflüchtete vergleichend in Deutschland (Berlin) und Jordanien (Zataari) untersucht werden.
Year 2018
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26 Project

Treatment of third country nationals at EU's external borders

Description
The project examines the treatment of third-country nationals at the external borders of the European Union in light of the existing fundamental rights framework. Two specific situations are taken into consideration: (1) treatment of third country nationals on the Southern maritime borders of the European Union (Phase I) and (2) treatment of third country nationals at selected land and airport border crossing points (Phase 2). The geographical scope of the research in Phase 1 covers 7 maritime border sectors in Cyprus, Greece, Italy, Malta and Spain; while in Phase 2 - eleven border crossing points at the external Schengen border, including six land border crossing points (BCPs between Bulgaria and Turkey, between Greece and Turkey, between Slovakia and Ukraine, between Hungary and Serbia, between Poland and Ukraine and between Spain and Morocco, and five border crossing points at selected airports (Paris C.d.Gaulle, Amsterdam/Schiphol, Rome/ Fiumicino, Frankfurt and Manchester). Phase 1 (Maritime borders) Objectives • to examine challenges that emerge during interception and rescue at sea and immediately after disembarkation of migrants • to enhance the protection of fundamental rights during rescue or interception operations at sea, by supporting those in charge of border management to deal with the fundamental rights challenges they may encounter on a daily basis. In Phase 1 the study is based on qualitative research with third country nationals, authorities, fishermen and shipmasters, non-participant observation at maritime borders, and focus group interviews with stakeholder groups, both in EU and third countries. Phase 2 (Land and airport border crossing points) Objectives • to review existing procedures and practices in order to identify whether third-country nationals are treated in accordance with applicable fundamental rights standards (complementation of the Schengen Evaluation system) • to review if commitments related to the Schengen Borders Code (respect for human dignity, non-refoulement, non-discriminatory conduct) are respected during first and second line border checks as well as in facilities used for persons refused admission. In Phase 2 the study is based on non-participant observation at border crossing points, quantitative and qualitative research with third country nationals, and interviews with civil society actors. Outcomes Maritime border research Empirical case studies (phase 1) • 7 case studies of maritime border sectors • 5 sets of country fact sheets (maritime borders), covering 7 themes • Comparative report of fundamental rights challenges relating to surveillance and control of maritime borders Human rights training related to rescue and interception at sea • 5 country reports on Fundamental Rights training • Recommendations for training of border guards Land and air border research • 11 case studies of border crossing points • 9 sets of country fact sheets on 4 themes • Comparative report on border crossing points
Year 2010
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27 Project

Citizenship as a rhetorical tool of nation-building: discourse in Flanders and Quebec

Authors Catherine Xhardez
Year 2020
Journal Name Citizenship Studies
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29 Journal Article

Tip of the Iceberg? Improving the Interpretation and Presentation of Trafficking Data

Authors Dita Vogel, International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD)
Year 2014
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31 Policy Brief

Doing Family Across Borders: A Comparative Study of Work, Family and Welfare Strategies among Polish Migrants in Norway, Sweden, and the UK.

Principal investigator Gunhild Odden (Principal Investigator), Pieter Bevelander (Researcher), Kathy Burrell (Researcher), Nils Olav Østrem (Researcher), Oleksandr Ryndyk (PhD Candidate)
Description
This project seeks to answer the main research question: how transnational family considerations, combined with labour market conjuncture and migrants' rights to welfare provision in the host country, shape migrant workers' relation to work and welfare? In order to answer this research question from a comparative perspective the project will focus on two groups of Polish migrant workers, living alone or reunited with the family in the host country, in three different welfare and labour market contexts (Norway, Sweden and the UK). The study will explain why some migrant workers fare relatively better at the host country's labour market, while others are more prone to rely on social welfare provision. The project will in particular look at migrants' actual and planned use of welfare provision, tax-reduction strategies, and their plans regarding family reunification, re-emigration or eventual retirement in the host country. The project will use mixed methods. At the beginning, data from available databases will be analysed (WP1). Further, a tailor-made online survey tool will be used to generate data missing in existing databases (WP2). The respondents will be recruited onboard international flights between Poland, Norway, Sweden, and the UK. Finally, the quantitative analyses will be complemented by qualitative analyses of semi-structured interviews with Polish migrant workers collected in Norway, Sweden, and the UK (WP3). A smooth implementation of the project will be ensured by including four overseas research grants between the Project Owner and the two international partners in Sweden and the UK. Apart from its high scientific value, the project will have an explicit practical value for Norwegian and international stakeholders dealing with the issues concerned in this study. Knowledge produced by the project can be used for policy formulation by relevant national organizations, including ministries, tax authorities, labour and welfare organizations.
Year 2016
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32 Project

Assessment and Implementation of the “Scientific Visa Package” (Researchers Directive 2005/71/EC and Recommendation 2005/761/EC)

Principal investigator Claire Healy (Project Coordinator)
Description
In 2005 the European Commission adopted the "Scientific Visa" package to make scientific careers more attractive and open up the Community to third-country nationals who might be admitted for the purposes of research. The package includes Directive 2005/71/EC on a specific procedure for admitting third-country nationals for the purposes of scientific research and Recommendation 2005/761/EC aiming to facilitate the issue by the Member States of uniform short-stay visas for researchers from third countries travelling within the Community for the purpose of carrying out scientific research. This ICMPD study, commissioned by the European Commission, covers the implementation and impact of the aspects of the package covered in the Directive and the Recommendation in all 27 EU member states. This forms part of a broader study on human resource policies and practices in research, on the “Scientific Visa” package and on the implementation of pan-EU pension schemes targeted at researchers. This is to provide support for a monitoring system on national policies on human resources in research and on their effects at the level of research organisations, foreseen in the 2009 People Specific Programme of the 7th Framework Programme. This should lead to improved knowledge of policy developments and actions on human resources in the European Research Area and their effects at the level of research organisations and improve the knowledge base for future policy developments. Specific aims • to conduct a conformity analysis of the legal and administrative framework in the 27 EU Member States for implementation of the Directive and Recommendation • to analyse the institutional set-up and implementation in practice of the provisions of the two legal instruments in the 27 EU Member States • to evaluate the impact of the research residence permits and visas on the basis of both quantitative and qualitative data and research • to identify any potential difficulties in implementation and suggestions for improvement • to identify good practices in relation to the implementation of the Directive and the Recommendation Outcomes Comparative report on Directive 2005/71/EC in 27 EU Member States: • Conformity analysis of how Member States have transposed the Directive into national law • Statistical analysis illustrating the impact of the Directive in quantitative terms • Assessment of the impact of the Directive, and identification of difficulties and good practices in its implementation, through extensive national and EU-level research and questionnaires Comparative report on Recommendation 2005/761/EC in 27 EU Member States • Analysis of the national legal and/or administrative frameworks relating to the Recommendation • Account of the authorities responsible and the institutional and procedural set-up for the implementation of these provisions • Assessment of the impact of the Recommendation, and identification of difficulties and good practices in its implementation, through extensive national and EU-level research and questionnaires
Year 2011
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33 Project

Global Labour in Rural Societies

Principal investigator Johan Fredrik Rye (Principal Investigator)
Description
The GLARUS project theorizes the ways in which rural societies are transformed as result of large-scale labour immigration, predominantly in low-skilled, manual industries, and how the different parties in the rural societies (immigrants, hosting communities) experience these processes. A key dimension is to explore hypothesized rural/urban and rural/rural differences: In what ways is rural immigration a different phenomenon from its urban counterpart? Are there differences in how the labour immigration phenomenon unfolds in rural communities? What are the implications of the economic base, demographic structure, peripherality, and historical experiences of the receiving communities? The conceptual approach draws on, seeks to cross-fertilize and moves beyond insights from three strands of literature: immigration theory, labour market theory and the rural studies tradition. Key concepts, theories and perspectives within these fields are transnationalism, segmented labour market theory, flexibilization and precarious work, and heterolocal identities, belongings and spaces. The project is genuinely comparative in its approach; nationally and internationally, to order to identify both generic aspects of rural labour migration, and to gain an understanding of how various contextual aspects influence the unfolding of the phenomenon. In Norway three rural study areas with different economic bases (agriculture, fish processing, and tourism) will be studied and compared to study cases in the US and the UK. These study cases will be explored using an extensive mixed-methods methodological design combining various qualitative and quantitative techniques. A key objective of the project is to develop a strong international research network on global rural labour. The project will recruit several young scholars and offer an extensive visiting scholar programme for early- and mid-career scientists.
Year 2017
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34 Project

Bohemia’s Antipodes: Post-Communist Czech Migration to New Zealand

Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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35 Journal Article

Bohemia’s Antipodes: Post-Communist Czech Migration to New Zealand

Authors Oksana Opara
Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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36 Journal Article

Drivers and patterns of rural youth migration and its impact on food security and rural livelihoods in Tunisia

Authors Carolina Viviana ZUCCOTTI, Andrew GEDDES, Alessia BACCHI, ...
Description
The RuMiT (Rural Migration in Tunisia) research addresses the determinants of migration and mobility, the patterns and types of rural youth outmigration and the impact of rural youth migration on rural livelihoods and societies in origin regions in Tunisia. The research used a mixed-methods approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods, providing comparative insights into: international and internal migrants and non-migrants; pre- and post-2011 migrants; households with and without migrants. Main results show that migrants from rural areas are increasingly highly educated and leaving to pursue their studies abroad. This particularly applies to women, who also register a decrease in marriage-related migration. Migration proves to be rewarding for both internal and international migrants, in terms of occupational and social security outcomes. In particular, migrant women have higher labour market participation and employment rates than non-migrants. As a direct consequence of an emigration which is still male dominated, households with migrants are increasingly feminized, i.e. with a higher share of women, who are more likely to be active compared with women in nonmigrant households. Migrant households were also found to have higher access to social security. While incomes from remittances tend not to be invested in productive activities, evidence shows that one internal migrant out of four and one international migrant out of three has an economic activity in the areas of origin, which in most of the cases is connected with agricultural or animal production. The Rural Migration in Tunisia (RuMiT) research project was undertaken in the framework of the FAO project “Youth mobility, food security and rural poverty reduction: Fostering rural diversification through enhanced youth employment and better mobility” (GCP/INT/240/ITA) – in brief, the Rural Youth Migration (RYM) project – implemented in Tunisia and Ethiopia between 2015 and 2017, and funded by the Italian Development Cooperation.
Year 2018
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39 Report

NOPOOR

Description
NOPOOR aims to build new knowledge on the nature and extent of poverty in developing countries to provide policymakers with a broader understanding of poverty. We believe that poverty cannot be tackled without a comprehensive approach. We know that poverty is a multidimensional phenomenon, but NOPOOR will explore new and uncharted dimensions. It is not just a picture of poverty, but also an understanding of poverty entry and exit processes that is needed for achieving MDGs and for making more effective the policies. Nineteen experienced partners are involved in the project, which includes ten teams from developing and emerging countries in three regions (Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia). These countries have implemented different poverty reduction policies, and this will form the basis for the comparative and case studies approach taken. The project will identify key mechanisms that explain the persistence and exacerbation of poverty, which have been altered by the insertion of developing countries into the globalization process, including trade, aid, FDI and migration, and by the growing interdependence of economies. Causes may differ between countries. This calls for policies and actions to be tailored to each poor country’s characteristics, including their access to resources, political regime, quality of institutions and governance. These points are developed by various approaches, including political economics, and different methods: surveys, econometric studies and case studies. NOPOOR will put significant resources into generating new knowledge from original surveys, database work and qualitative work. .It will also look forward to future scenarios. Conclusions will be oriented to policy recommendations. Beyond this contribution to scientific knowledge, NOPOOR will pursue an active policy of dissemination and capacity building, including training of young Southern researchers and the implementation of a permanent network with National Institutes of Statistics (NIS). The project is policy-oriented. NOPOOR will accompany the EU's agenda for its policy against poverty by consultations, guidance notes, and policy briefs on issues relating to the program. The review of MDG will constitute an important point of focus in the future years.
Year 2012
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42 Project

Introduction: Preparing the Way for Qualitative Research in Migration Studies

Authors Evren Yalaz, Ricard Zapata-Barrero
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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43 Book Chapter

The Interview in Migration Studies: A Step towards a Dialogue and Knowledge Co-production?

Authors Violetta Zentai, Olena Fedyuk
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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44 Book Chapter

Child Health and Migrant Parents in South-East Asia

Description
Migration is often part of an economically beneficial livelihood strategy for transnational families. For many of the sending countries in Southeast Asia, a growing proportion of transnational migrants, particularly in Indonesia and the Philippines, are women. Many of these female migrants are married and an unknown number leave their children behind. To date, no official data exists on the number of children under 12 years of age with one or both parents absent due to migration but anecdotal evidence suggests that growing numbers of transnational migrants from the region leave children behind. Although most migrants send remittances to left-behind kin, visits home tend to be infrequent with migrants going away for two or more years at a time. With demand from wealthy countries for domestic workers, nurses and other carers increasing as their populations age, solving care problems in rich countries may be creating a considerable ‘crisis of care’ in less developed countries. However, little is known about the multi-dimensional impacts of migration on left-behind families, particularly children. It is not known whether left-behind children themselves are more vulnerable to poor physical and mental health outcomes, or in what way, when and under what circumstances do they benefit and/or suffer from the absence of parent(s), especially when the migrant is the child’s mother. CHAMPSEA Wave 1 is the first mixed-method study aimed at filling this significant gap in existing knowledge by examining both the reconfiguration of familial support systems after parental migration and the impact on child health/well-being in Southeast Asia. CHAMPSEA Wave 2 continues to investigate the long-term impacts of parental migration on the health and well-being of children who took part in CHAMPSEA Wave 1. The follow-up study surveyed and interviewed members of the same CHAMPSEA households in Indonesia (East and West Java) and the Philippines (Bulacan and Laguna) including children in middle childhood (then 3, 4 and 5 years and are now 11, 12 and 13) and young adults (then 9, 10 and 11 and are now 17, 18 and 19). Using the same mixed-methods research design utilised in CHAMPSEA Wave 1 that capitalizes on the complementary strengths of quantitative and qualitative methods, CHAMPSEA Wave 2 collects primary data using carefully designed survey instruments in order to create a unique longitudinal data set that will allow the investigation of multiple dimensions of children’s health and well-being. Through the longitudinal examination of transnational migration/householding, familial care politics and left-behind children, CHAMPSEA Wave 2 aims to: enhance knowledge on the health and well-being of children left behind in Southeast Asia when one/both parents migrate overseas for work; examine comparative impacts of paternal/maternal migration on child health over time; and contribute to academic, community, and policy debates in the region and beyond on larger questions relating to the feminisation of ‘care migration’ and the politics of care in sending communities, the organisation of reproductive labour within transnational households, and the migration-and-development nexus.
Year 2008
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45 Project

Where, What and Whom to Study? Principles, Guidelines and Empirical Examples of Case Selection and Sampling in Migration Research

Authors Karolina Barglowski
Book Title Qualitative Research in European Migration Studies
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48 Book Chapter

Migration of Ukrainians to the European Union: Background and Key Issues

Authors Marta Kindler, Olena Fedyuk
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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49 Book Chapter

Migration Statistics in Europe: A Core Component of Governance and Population Research

Authors David Reichel, Albert Kraler, Han Entzinger
Book Title Integrating Immigrants in Europe
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50 Book Chapter

The Temporary Nature of Ukrainian Migration: Definitions, Determinants and Consequences

Authors Marta Kindler, Agata Górny
Book Title Ukrainian Migration to the European Union
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51 Book Chapter

Between National Models and Multi-Level Decoupling: The Pursuit of Multi-Level Governance in Dutch and UK Policies Towards Migrant Incorporation

Authors Peter Scholten
Year 2016
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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52 Journal Article

EU Migration and the Economic Crisis: Concepts and Issues

Authors Mikolaj Stanek, Jean-Michel Lafleur
Book Title South-North Migration of EU Citizens in Times of Crisis
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53 Book Chapter

Evolution of negative visual frames of immigrants and refugees in the main media of Southern Europe

Authors Javier J. Amores, Carlos Arcila-Calderón, David Blanco-Herrero
Year 2020
Journal Name El Profesional de la Información
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54 Journal Article

Is Social Contact With the Resident Population a Prerequisite of Well-Being and Place Attachment? The Case of Refugees in Rural Regions of Germany

Authors Birgit Glorius, Stefan Kordel, Tobias Weidinger, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name Frontiers in Sociology - Section Migration and Society
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55 Journal Article

Queering Asylum in Europe: A Survey Report

Authors Carmelo Danisi, Vítor Lopes Andrade, Moira Dustin, ...
Description
This report discusses the data gathered through two surveys carried out in the context of the SOGICA project. SOGICA – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Claims of Asylum: A European human rights challenge – is a four-year (2016-2020) research project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) that explores the social and legal experiences of people across Europe claiming international protection on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI).
Year 2020
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56 Report

Facilitors of Integration? The Potential Role of Museums in Integration as a Two-Way Process

Authors Susanne Boersma
Year 2020
Journal Name Museological Review
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57 Journal Article

Governing protracted displacement: An analysis across global, regional and domestic contexts

Authors Nuno Ferreira, Carolien Jacobs, Pamela Kea, ...
Year 2020
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58 Working Paper

Orientamento professionale e placement dei cittadini di Paesi Terzi

Authors Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Federica De Carlo
Year 2020
Journal Name FORMAZIONE & INSEGNAMENTO. Rivista internazionale di Scienze dell'educazione e della formazione, 18(1), 418-426.
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59 Journal Article

Migrating Borders Territorial Rescaling and Citizenship Realignment in Europe

Authors Jean-Thomas Arrighi de Casanova, Dejan Stjepanovic
Year 2020
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60 Book

Youth mobility and the development of human capital: is there a Southern European model?

Authors Barbara Staniscia, Luca Deravignone, Beatriz González-Martín, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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61 Journal Article

Identification and Categorization of Refugees’ Integration Prospects in the Greek Socio-Economic System. Case Study in Mytilene and Crete Islands

Authors Dimitrios Kotroyannos, Stylianos Ioannis Tzagarakis, Apostolos Kamekis, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name European Quarterly of Political Attitudes and Mentalities EQPAM
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62 Journal Article

Living with difference: Refugee education and school segregation processes in Greece

Authors Pinelopy Vergou, University of Thessaly
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
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63 Journal Article

Living with difference: Refugee education and school segregation processes in Greece

Authors Pinelopy Vergou, University of Thessaly
Year 2019
Journal Name Urban Studies
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64 Journal Article

Why is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles to intra-European mobility

Authors Emilia Kmiotek-Meier, Jan Skrobanek, Birte Nienaber, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Migration Letters
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65 Journal Article

Comparative overview of national protection statuses in the EU and Norway (Country report Luxembourg)

Authors Adolfo Sommarribas, Ralph Petry, Birte Nienaber
Description
Luxembourg has integrated in the protection system the European legal framework on protection. However, besides the international protection (refugee status and subsidiary protection status) and the temporary protection statuses, the Luxembourgish legal system foresees two humanitarian statuses which are: a) residence permit for private reasons based on serious humanitarian grounds; b) the postponement of removal based on medical reasons. In regard to the latter, there are the following steps: 1) the postponement of removal can be granted and renewed for up to 24 months; 2) after 2 years, if the medical condition persists, an authorisation of stay for medical reasons may be granted and a residence permit for private reasons may be issued. However, it is important to stress at this point that the Luxembourgish authorities do not consider the two aforementioned residence permits issued according to articles 78 (3) and 131 (2) of the Immigration Law as “protection statuses” as such, but precisely as residence permits issued to the applicant. The granting of these two “protection statuses” are based on the discretionary power of the Minister in charge of Immigration and Asylum. The residence permit for private reasons based on humanitarian grounds (Status A of this report) allows for the Minister to grant an authorisation to stay in the country to an irregular migrant if s/he is in in need to stay based on humanitarian reasons of exceptional circumstances. There is not an exhaustive list of reasons on which the Minister can base his/her decision. However, there is an exhaustive analysis of the reasons advance by the applicant. Any third country national irregularly staying on the territory can apply for this residence permit. However, in the case of rejected asylum seekers, the application will be rejected if the applicant advances the same reasons that s/he advanced during the international protection procedure. On the contrary, the residence permit for medical reasons requires that, in the first stage, the applicant had received a return decision and an order to leave the territory. In order to obtain the residence permit, he/she has to obtain first a decision for a postponement of removal for medical reasons that has to be renewed for two years before the applicant can file the application for the residence permit based on medical reasons. This residence permit is not granted automatically and if the applicant does not file his/her application after expiration of the postponement of removal for medical reasons after two years, s/he will be precluded and the return decision will be executed, except if s/he proves that s/he cannot be returned for medical reasons. In this case, the entire procedure will have to start again.
Year 2019
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66 Report

Migration and Border Politics in The South of United States And Spain

Authors María Isolda Perelló
Year 2019
Journal Name Migration and Diasporas: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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67 Journal Article

Wie? Warum? Oder warum nicht? Mobilitätsfelder sowie Motivationen und Barrieren für Jugendmobilität in Europa

Authors Karen Hemming, Emilia Kmiotek-Meier, Tabea Schlimbach, ...
Year 2019
Book Title Forum International Youth Work 2016-2018
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68 Book Chapter

Exclusionary moments: Queer desires and migrants' sense of (un)belonging

Year 2018
Journal Name Emotion, Space and Society
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70 Journal Article

Where the Wild Things Are: Fear of Islam and the Anti-Refugee Rhetoric in Hungary and in Poland

Authors Elżbieta M. Goździak, Péter Márton
Year 2018
Journal Name Central and Eastern European Migration Review
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71 Journal Article

What's in a Name? Causes and Consequences of Labelling Minorities as “National” or “Migrant”: Roma in Italy and Spain

Authors Tina Magazzini
Year 2018
Journal Name International Migration
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72 Journal Article

PERCEPCIONES Y ACTITUDES ANTE LA MIGRACIÓN EN EUROPA, ESPAÑA Y ANDALUCÍA, 2016-2017. UNA PERSPECTIVA COMPARADA.

Description
La Consejería de Justicia e Interior, a través de la Dirección General de Coordinación de Políticas Migratorias y el Observatorio Permanente Andaluz de las Migraciones (OPAM), presenta el Tema OPAM número 17, que analizade forma comparadala percepción de la ciudadanía sobre el fenómeno migratorioen tres contextos: en Europa, España y Andalucía.A través del análisis de los últimosdatos publicados enel informe“Integration of immigrants in the European Union”del Eurobarómetro de 2017, de laúltima encuesta “Actitudes hacia la inmigración (IX)”,publicadapor el Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas en2016 (en adelante CIS)y delinforme“Opiniones y Actitudes de la población Andaluza ante la Inmigración”(en adelante OPIA)de 2017 delOPAM,se han podido identificarlas principales opiniones y actitudes de la ciudadanía ante la migraciónen cada uno de los contextos. Según estimaciones de Naciones Unidas1en el mundo hay 244 millones de personas inmigrantes que viven en un país distinto alque nacieron, cifra que ha supuesto un incremento del 41% desde el año 2000 (con un aumento de casi 100 millones respecto a1990). El Eurostat2señala que en 2016 emigraron a la UE 2 millones de personas ciudadanas de terceros países. Los motivos para emigrar son múltiples,desde quienes lo hacen en busca de mejores oportunidades laborales o de vida hasta quienes huyende la pobreza, de la persecución o de los conflictos. La migración viene determinadapor una combinación de factores económicos, medioambientales políticos y sociales:ya sea en el país de origen de la personamigrante (factores impulsores) o en el país de destino (factores motivadores). Históricamente, se ha creídoque la prosperidad económica y la estabilidad política de los países miembros de laUE han ejercido un efecto llamada sobre las personas migrantes.En definitiva, la importancia de presentareste monográfico radica en la creciente necesidad deconvivencia entre las personas de origen extranjeroy las andaluzas. Analizar las percepciones de la ciudadaníasobre la inmigraciónpuede dar cuenta de cómo abordar los procesos para favorecer sufavorableintegración y conseguiruna exitosa convivencia ennuestras sociedades.
Year 2018
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73 Report

How Immigrant and Ethnic-Minority Writers have become a Vanguard of Cultural Change: Comparing Historical Developments, Political Changes and Literary Debates in Fifteen National Contexts

Year 2018
Book Title Immigrant and Ethnic-Minority Writers since 1945: Fourteen National Contexts in Europe and Beyond
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76 Book Chapter

Walloons as general or specific others? A comparison of anti-Walloon and anti-immigrant attitudes in Flanders

Authors Bart Meuleman, Koen Abts, Cecil Meeusen
Year 2017
Journal Name Psychologica Belgica
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78 Journal Article

Crossing the Mediterranean Sea by Boat: Mapping and Documenting Migratory Journeys and Experiences

Authors V. Squire, A. Dimitriadi, N. Perkowski, ...
Description
This report provides a unique, in-depth analysis of the impact of EU policies in addressing the socalled European migration or refugee ‘crisis’ in 2015 and 2016. Crossing the Mediterranean Sea by Boat undertook 257 in-depth qualitative interviews with a total of 271 participants across seven sites in two phases: Kos, Malta and Sicily from September-November 2015, and Athens, Berlin, Istanbul and Rome from May-July 2016. Uniquely, the project focused directly on the impact of policies upon people on the move, drawing together policy analysis and observational fieldwork with in-depth analysis of qualitative interview data from people making – or contemplating making – the dangerous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. As such, the report provides previously-unconsidered insights into the effects of policy on the journeys, experiences, understandings, expectations, concerns and demands of people on the move. In addition to providing seven site-based case study analyses, the project also provides the first detailed assessment of policies associated with A European Agenda on Migration in terms of policy effects both across routes (eastern and central Mediterranean) and over time (2015 and 2016). The findings and analysis summarised in this report are presented with the aim of informing policy developments, moving forward.
Year 2017
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79 Report

Vijfentwintig jaar onderzoek naar de houding tegenover migranten in België. Verandering en stabiliteit in de periode 1991-2014

Authors Jaak Billiet, Koen Abts, Jolien Galle, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Sociologos
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80 Journal Article

Gedifferentieerde dreiging en de verklaring van vooroordelen: Anti-immigranten attitudes, islamofobie, antisemitisme en homonegativiteit vergeleken

Authors Bart Meuleman, Koen Abts, Koen Slootmaeckers, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Sociologos
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82 Journal Article

The Growing Importance of Diaspora Politics

Year 2016
Journal Name Current History
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83 Journal Article

The Growing Importance of Diaspora Politics

Year 2016
Journal Name Current History
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84 Journal Article

Integration Indicators: the difference between monitoring integration and evaluating policies

Authors Thomas Huddleston
Year 2016
Book Title Routledge Handbook on Immigration and Refugee Studies
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85 Book Chapter

The unravelling of the EU's common policy on migration: Did the Emperor ever have any clothes?

Authors Martin Baldwin-Edwards
Year 2016
Journal Name ΔΙΕΘΝΗΣ ΚΑΙ ΕΥΡΩΠΑΙΚΗ ΠΟΛΙΤΙΚΗ
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86 Journal Article

The Comparability of Measurements of Attitudes Toward Immigration in the European Social Survey: Exact Versus Approximate Measurement Equivalence

Authors Eldad Davidov, Jan Ciechiuc, Bart Meuleman, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name Public Opinion Quarterly
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87 Journal Article

Políticas de control migratorio. Estudio comparado de España y EE. UU.

Authors Antonio Izquierdo Escribano, Wayne A. Cornelius
Year 2012
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88 Book

Labour immigration and labour markets in the GCC countries: national patterns and trends

Description
Using the latest statistical data from six GCC states and recent publications of the GCC Secretariat, a detailed profile is presented of immigration and employment across the region. Evaluation is made of the available data sources (listed in the appendix) and the actual extent of immigrant presence in both population and labour market is critically examined. Employment according to public/private sector, and also for fifteen economic sectors, is shown for each country (where available) by citizenship type and gender. Previously unpublished indicators, such as unemployment and participation rates, are calculated where possible by citizenship type, gender and age groups; a few countries provide data on actual nationalities or regional groupings of foreign employees, and these are reproduced here. Previously neglected issues that receive some attention are foreign births, family presence, foreign schoolchildren and duration of residence (the latter available only for the UAE). The emergence of the kafala system is examined in historical context; in particular, emphasis is placed on its role in promoting irregularities in the migration, residence and employment of foreigners across the GCC. Trends in government policies are described, including the recent and significant doubts in some countries about the ability of the kafala system to produce satisfactory outcomes. Some attention is paid to the important policies of nationalization’ of GCC labour markets: a conceptual categorization of such policies is made, according to five different policy objectives. Using both the broad and more detailed sectoral employment data previously presented, evaluation is then made of the degree of success of each country’s initiatives in this area. The paper concludes with an exposition of the commonalities and differences across the GCC in managing their labour markets and immigration. The structural specificities of each country are outlined, along with tentative prognoses of their future needs for immigrant workers.
Year 2011
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89 Report

Integration policies across the Atlantic: How far behind is Europe, how far ahead

Authors Thomas Huddleston
Year 2011
Book Title International Perspectives: Integration and Inclusion
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90 Book Chapter

The New Migratory Routes of Europe? Polish and Romanian Emigrations in a Comparative Historical Perspective

Authors Aurore Flipo
Year 2009
Journal Name Romanian Journal of European Studies
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91 Journal Article

Tracing UMAs´ families A comparative study of some European countries´ practices and experiences in tracing the parents or caregivers of unaccompanied minor asylum seekers

Authors Kirsten Danielsen, Marie Louise Seeberg
Description
This report is a study of different European countries´ practices and experiences in tracing the parents or other caregivers of separated minor asylum seekers. The term "unaccompanied minor asylum seekers" (UMAs) refers to children under the age of 18 who are separated from their caregivers, and who apply for asylum in a foreign country. The increase in the numbers of UMAs arriving in Europe from 2000-2003, along with an understanding of UMAs as particularly vulnerable, formed the point of departure for the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration to initiate this study. Our main source of data has been an electronic, web-based survey. The questionnaire was sent to Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. None of these countries have a separate tracing unit within the organization responsible for tracing UMAs´ families. All the countries co-operate with NGOs, mostly with the national offices of the Red Cross on an ad hoc basis.Some countries make use of their embassies or other diplomatic missions in the UMAs countries of origin. Our findings show that tracing work is both difficult and resource-demanding, and the success rate generally low. Furthermore, not all successful family tracing leads to family reunification. In most cases, if the countries do not succeed in their tracing attempts or adequate care is not available in the country of origin or a third country, the minor is given temporary or permanent residence in the receiving country.
Year 2006
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92 Report
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