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Home and belonging: a comparative study of 1.5 and second-generation Egyptian ‘expatriates’ in Qatar and ‘immigrants’ in the U.S.

Authors Nada Soudy
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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1 Journal Article

Welfare Index of Migrant Workers in the Gulf: the Case of Qatar

Authors Abdoulaye Diop, S. Al-Ali Mustafa, Michael Ewers, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
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2 Journal Article

Staging globalization for national projects: Global sport markets and elite athletic transnational labour in Qatar

Authors Rook Campbell
Year 2011
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL REVIEW FOR THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
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3 Journal Article

Dengue and chikungunya seroprevalence among Qatari nationals and immigrants residing in Qatar

Authors John M. Humphrey, Soha R. Dargham, Enas S. Al-Absi, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name PLoS ONE
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4 Journal Article

2022 Qatar World Cup: Impact Perceptions among Qatar Residents

Authors A. Al-Emadi, Kien Trung Le, Michael Sagas, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name JOURNAL OF TRAVEL RESEARCH
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5 Journal Article

Antecedents of Trust among Citizens and Non-citizens in Qatar

Authors Abdoulaye Diop, Jill Wittrock, Ashley E. Jardina, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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6 Journal Article

Demography, migration, and labour market in Qatar

Authors Françoise DE BEL-AIR
Description
In 2013, Qatar ranked second worldwide in terms of per capita GDP. This is due to its huge endowment in hydrocarbons and the small size of its national population, the smallest in all GCC countries. Exploiting the resources and channeling them into ambitious development policies required massive imports of foreign labour. The country's total population has quintupled since the mid-1980s; moreover, foreign nationals made an estimated 85.7 per cent of all residents and up to 94.1 per cent of all employed population in 2013. The awarding of the 2022 FIFA World Cup to Qatar in December 2010 turned the spotlight on the country's dilemma regarding the 'number vs. rights trade-off' issue: Qatar has one of the most constraining kafala systems in the region. Paradoxically, however, demographic data also indicate that a growing share of foreigners live with their families, give birth in the country, and intermarry with Qataris. The strict separation between nationals and migrants could thus start slowly eroding.
Year 2014
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8 Report

Between global citizenship and Qatarization: negotiating Qatar's new knowledge economy within American branch campuses

Authors Neha Vora
Year 2014
Journal Name Ethnic and Racial Studies
Citations (WoS) 6
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9 Journal Article

Qatar's legal framework of migration

Authors Maysa ZAHRA
Description
Over the last decade, Qatar has significantly revised its legal framework in a number of areas that are relevant to the issue of migration. The revision has led to the establishment of rules and regulations that better conform to international standards in areas such as labour rights and human traf- ficking. However, Qatar's controversial kefala (sponsorship) system is still a source of concern. This note offers researchers a succinct outline and summary of Qatar's legal framework on migration. The system of migration-related legislation in the State of Qatar includes the Constitution, international treaties concluded, national laws and by-laws.
Year 2013
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10 Report

Access, security and diplomacy Perceptions of soft power, nation branding and the organisational challenges facing Qatar's 2022 FIFA World Cup

Authors Joel Rookwood
Year 2019
Journal Name SPORT BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL
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11 Journal Article

Arab Gulf States : recruitment of Asian workers

Authors Ray JUREIDINI
Description
This paper addresses a neglected area in studies of migrant labor in the Gulf States showing that exploitation of migrant workers occurs before deployment. Evidence from interviews conducted in the five major labour sending countries to Qatar (Philippines, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and India) suggests that the recruitment procedures and corrupt practices by recruitment agencies and employing company personnel in the receiving country place unskilled workers in a highly vulnerable position prior to departure from their home countries. As a consequence of practices such as deception, false promises, substitute contracts, bribery, and extortion, there is evidence of debt bondage, forced labor, and trafficking within the normative framework of labor migration. Reform measures that are currently underway in Qatar include the banning of workers paying recruitment fees and charges to agents.
Year 2014
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12 Report

Examining the cross-cultural attitudes of Qataris and expatriates in Qatar, the host country of 2022 World Cup

Authors Abdoulaye Diop, Ahmed Al-Emadi, Kiki Kaplanidou, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EVENT AND FESTIVAL MANAGEMENT
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13 Journal Article

Labor Camp Surveys in GCC Countries: Group Quarter Subsampling

Authors Kien Trung Le, Abdoulaye Diop, Stacy Pancratz
Year 2019
Journal Name FIELD METHODS
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14 Journal Article

Im/mobile highly skilled migrants in Qatar

Authors Zahra Babar, Michael Ewers, Nabil Khattab
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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15 Journal Article

Qatar, the Coronavirus, and Cordons Sanitaires: Migrant Workers and the Use of Public Health Measures to Define the Nation

Authors Natsha Iskander
Year 2020
Journal Name MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY
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16 Journal Article

Textbox 5: Measuring the Household Effects of Temporary Overseas Work: A Unique New Study in India

Authors Michael Clemens
Book Title Global Perspectives on Migration and Development
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17 Book Chapter

CROSS-CULTURAL CONTACT AND ATTITUDES OF QATARI STUDENTS IN THE UNITED-STATES

Authors AA KAMAL, G MARUYAMA
Year 1990
Journal Name International Journal of Intercultural Relations
Citations (WoS) 17
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18 Journal Article

Migration in Pre-oil Qatar: A Sketch

Authors Mohammed Alsudairi, Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf
Year 2015
Journal Name Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism
Citations (WoS) 1
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19 Journal Article

Ethiopian Labor Migrants and the "Free Visa" System in Qatar

Authors Silvia Pessoa, Laura Harkness, Andrew M. Gardner
Year 2014
Journal Name HUMAN ORGANIZATION
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20 Journal Article

Attracting and retaining expatriates in Qatar during an era of uncertainty: Would you stay or would you go?

Authors Michael Ewers, Bethany Shockley
Year 2018
Journal Name Population, Space and Place
Citations (WoS) 1
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21 Journal Article

‘Why Do You Ask?’ The Nature and Impacts of Attitudes towards Public Opinion Surveys in the Arab World

Authors Justin J. Gengler, Mark Tessler, Russell Lucas, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name British Journal of Political Science
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22 Journal Article

Liberal arts education in Qatar: intercultural perspectives

Authors Magdalena Rostron
Year 2009
Journal Name Intercultural Education
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23 Journal Article

Sudanese Migration to the New World: Socio‐economic Characteristics

Authors Rogaia M. Abusharaf
Year 1997
Journal Name International Migration
Citations (WoS) 9
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25 Journal Article

The legal framework of the sponsorship systems of Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait : a comparative examination

Authors Maysa ZAHRA
Description
The sponsorship system of the Arab Gulf countries comprises rules and regulations that tie the residence of a migrant worker to his/her sponsor in the country. This paper offers an in-depth examination of the legal framework of the sponsorship system of three countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) - Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. The paper looks at different aspects of the system starting with the requirement for sponsorship and ending with the rules on absconding and repatriation.
Year 2014
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26 Report

The legal framework of the sponsorship systems of the Gulf Cooperation Council countries : a comparative examination

Authors Maysa ZAHRA
Description
The sponsorship system of the Arab Gulf countries comprises rules and regulations that tie the residence of a migrant worker to his/her sponsor in the country. This paper offers an in-depth examination of the legal framework of the sponsorship system of the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) ヨ Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman and the United Arab Emirates. It looks at different aspects of the system starting with the requirement for sponsorship and ending with the rules on absconding and repatriation.
Year 2015
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27 Report

Producing ideal Bangladeshi migrants for precarious construction work in Qatar

Authors Priya Deshingkar, C. R. Abrar, Mirza Taslima Sultana, ...
Year 2019
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Citations (WoS) 2
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28 Journal Article

Empowering employees: the other side of electronic performance monitoring

Authors Karma Sherif, Omolola Jewesimi, Mazen El-Masri
Year 2020
Journal Name JOURNAL OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & ETHICS IN SOCIETY
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29 Journal Article

CROSS-CULTURAL CONTACT AND ATTITUDES OF QATARI STUDENTS IN THE UNITED-STATES

Authors AA KAMAL, G MARUYAMA
Year 1990
Journal Name International Journal of Intercultural Relations
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30 Journal Article

Dietary Habits of an Expat Nation: Case of Qatar

Authors Yelena Mejova, Hamed Haddadi, Sofiane Abbar, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name 2015 International Conference on Healthcare Informatics
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31 Journal Article

Policies for naturalisation of foreign-born athletes: Qatar and Turkey in comparison

Authors Danyel Reiche, Cem Tinaz
Year 2019
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT POLICY AND POLITICS
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33 Journal Article

Trading Citizenship, Human Capital and the European Union

Authors David Owen
Book Title Debating transformations of national citizenship
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34 Book Chapter

A new era for labour migration in the GCC?

Authors Philip Martin, Froilan T. Malit
Year 2017
Journal Name Migration Letters
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35 Journal Article

Migrant Worker Well-Being and Its Determinants: The Case of Qatar

Authors Michael Ewers, Kien Trung Le, Abdoulaye Diop, ...
Year 2020
Journal Name SOCIAL INDICATORS RESEARCH
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36 Journal Article

FM radio and the Malayali diaspora in Qatar: at home overseas

Authors Irene Ann Promodh
Year 2020
Journal Name Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
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37 Journal Article

Proxy reporting in education surveys: factors influencing accurate reporting in the 2012 Qatar Education Study

Authors Jill Wittrock, Brian Hunscher, Linda Kimmel, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name International Journal of Social Research Methodology
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38 Journal Article

Investing in sporting success as a domestic and foreign policy tool: the case of Qatar

Authors Danyel Reiche
Year 2015
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT POLICY AND POLITICS
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39 Journal Article

The Perspective of Muslim Consumers on Extravagance: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study in Turkey, Qatar and Indonesia

Authors Hasan Terzi, Remzi Altunisik
Year 2016
Journal Name TARIH KULTUR VE SANAT ARASTIRMALARI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF HISTORY CULTURE AND ART RESEARCH
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40 Journal Article

Evaluating financial literacy training for migrant workers in the gulf

Authors Ganesh K. SESHAN
Description
We randomly assigned invitations to a savings-focused financial literacy workshop for married migrant Indian workers in Qatar on work contracts. Via surveys of migrants as well as their wives remaining behind in India, we provide a unique window into financial decision-making in transnational households. Migrants with low savings are most responsive, increasing their own savings and the remittances sent to their wives. They are also more likely to engage in joint decision making on money matters with spouses back home. From a practical standpoint, these results suggest that financial literacy interventions have a real potential to change migrant financial behaviours and are particularly relevant for temporary migrants in aiding them to maximise the accumulation of savings during their period of stay abroad.
Year 2015
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41 Report

Socioeconomic Achievement Among Arab Immigrants in the USA: The Influence of Region of Origin and Gender

Authors Abdi M. Kusow, Kristine J. Ajrouch, Mamadi Corra
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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42 Journal Article

The 'Aura' of Home Fairouz and the Arab Diaspora of Doha, Qatar

Authors Dima Issa
Year 2019
Journal Name MIDDLE EAST JOURNAL OF CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION
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43 Journal Article

Skilful survivals : irregular migration to the Gulf

Authors Philippe FARGUES, Nasra M. SHAH
Year 2017
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44 Book

Social Capital and Citizens’ Attitudes towards Migrant Workers

Authors Abdoulaye Diop, Yaojun Li, Majed Mohammmed H. A. Al-Ansari, ...
Year 2017
Journal Name Social Inclusion
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45 Journal Article

La migration marocaine dans les pays du Golfe

Authors Mohamed KHACHANI
Description
La migration économique vers l’Arabie Saoudite et les Emirats Arabes Unis a pris de l’importance principalement à partir du « boom pétrolier » de 1973. Cette migration intéresse pratiquement toutes les régions du Maroc ; elle est favorisée par les mesures restrictives prises par l’Europe et les similitudes culturelles avec ces pays. Les secteurs d’emploi des migrants dans ces pays couvrent une gamme très variée de branches dans le secteur des services, avec une prédominance de l’emploi féminin en particulier aux EAU, mais aussi dans les petits métiers tels l’artisanat, la mécanique, l’électricité et l’électronique, etc. Globalement, l’approche politique à cette question est menée sous le signe du paradoxe : « le besoin en main-d’œuvre et le non désir des étrangers» Cette peur d’être absorbés par les étrangers s’explique par le fait que les pays du Golfe enregistrent les taux de migration les plus élevés au monde. Si avec l’Arabie Saoudite, le Maroc n’a pas signé de convention de main-d’œuvre, il est lié par un accord avec les EAU et le Qatar signés en 1981 (et avec la Libye signé en 1983). Cette migration dans les pays du Golfe rapporte au Maroc une manne financière substantielle, il enregistre dans la région un fort taux des transferts. Abstract Since the 1973 oil crisis, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates have evolved into important receiver countries of labour migration flows. One of the main sender countries has been Morocco, due both to the limitations put in place by the traditional receiving countries in Europe and the similarity of cultural habits. As to their economic profile, Moroccans emigrants have been employed in a huge variety of sectors, e.g. services, handcrafts, electricity, electronic, and so on. On the whole, the political approach towards immigration issues in the Gulf countries can be summarized by the paradox “wanting labour but not foreigners”. This concern about migrants is partially explained by the fact that the Gulf countries register, today, the world’s highest net migration rates. From a legal perspective, Morocco signed bilateral labour migration agreements with United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Libya. Finally, in terms of migrants’ remittances, immigration in the Gulf countries represents a very important resource for the Moroccan economy.
Year 2009
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46 Report

Asymmetric Information under the Kafala Sponsorship System: Impacts on Foreign Domestic Workers' Income and Employment Status in the GCC Countries

Authors Froilan T. Malit, George Naufal
Year 2016
Journal Name International Migration
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47 Journal Article

Pakistani Workers in the Middle East: Volume, Trends and Consequences

Authors Nasra M. Shah
Year 1983
Journal Name International Migration Review
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48 Journal Article

Citizenship and migration in Arab Gulf monarchies

Authors J. Sater
Year 2014
Journal Name Citizenship Studies
Citations (WoS) 9
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50 Journal Article

Making Room for Migrants, Making Sense of Difference: Spatial and Ideological Expressions of Social Diversity in Urban Qatar

Authors Sharon Nagy
Year 2006
Journal Name Urban Studies
Citations (WoS) 56
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51 Journal Article

Health and well-being of Nepalese migrant workers abroad

Authors Pratik Adhikary, Steven Keen, Zoë A. Sheppard, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
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53 Journal Article

Migrant Knowledge Workers’ Perceptions of Housing Conditions in Gulf Cities

Authors Ashraf M. Salama, Florian Wiedmann, Hatem G. Ibrahim
Year 2018
Journal Name Journal of International Migration and Integration
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54 Journal Article

Ethnic differences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest among Middle Eastern Arabs and North African populations living in Qatar

Authors Furqan B. Irfan, Maaret Castren, Zain A. Bhutta, ...
Year 2018
Journal Name Ethnicity & Health
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55 Journal Article

Football in Arabic literature in diaspora: Global influences and local manifestations

Authors Yousef Awad
Year 2016
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL REVIEW FOR THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
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56 Journal Article

Everyday Inclusions: Rethinking Ethnocracy, Kafala, and Belonging in the Arabian Peninsula

Authors Neha Vora, Natalie Koch
Year 2015
Journal Name Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism
Citations (WoS) 10
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57 Journal Article

Addressing inequality, enhancing diversity and facilitating greater dialogue in the hosting of sporting mega events.

Description
Major sporting events (MSEs) have been the subject of increasing levels of critique in recent years for the social costs associated with their bidding, planning and delivery. The rationale used by cities and countries for hosting MSEs is often the potential for an event to generate positive economic and social transformation within the host area (Brittain, Bocarro, Byers and Swart, 2017). However, research has repeatedly demonstrated actual impacts of hosting MSEs fall short of these lofty claims and in reality often result in detrimental effects for host populations. The negative impacts of MSEs have variously been reported as: exacerbating human rights abuses; facilitating corruption; supporting elite beneficiaries over those most in need; and transforming host destinations’ urban environment by displacing vulnerable populations. Recent mega sport events (a specific category of the largest MSEs, such as the Olympic Games and World Cup; Muller, 2015) have been the subject of international condemnation for being the catalyst for forced evictions (Beijing 2008; Rio de Janeiro, 2016), restricting media freedom through censorship (Sochi, 2014), abuse of migrant labour in the construction of facilities (Sochi, 2014; Qatar, 2022) and increased political repression (Beijing, 2008). Human Rights Watch has suggested that “Time after time, Olympic hosts have gotten away with abusing workers building stadiums, and with crushing critics and media who try to report about abuses…the right to host the Olympics needs to come with the responsibility not to abuse basic human rights” (Minky Worden, Director of Global Initiatives, HRW). The EventRights project will explore and produce recommendations as to how MSEs can influence MSE organizing committees and other stakeholders to ensure that progressive social opportunities to address inequality, enhance diversity and facilitate greater dialogue are enshrined in the planning, delivery and legacy plans for the events themselves.
Year 2018
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59 Project

The Gulf Monarchies beyond the Arab spring : changes and challenges

Authors Luigi NARBONE, Martin LESTRA
Year 2015
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61 Book

Labour immigration and labour markets in the GCC countries: national patterns and trends

Description
Using the latest statistical data from six GCC states and recent publications of the GCC Secretariat, a detailed profile is presented of immigration and employment across the region. Evaluation is made of the available data sources (listed in the appendix) and the actual extent of immigrant presence in both population and labour market is critically examined. Employment according to public/private sector, and also for fifteen economic sectors, is shown for each country (where available) by citizenship type and gender. Previously unpublished indicators, such as unemployment and participation rates, are calculated where possible by citizenship type, gender and age groups; a few countries provide data on actual nationalities or regional groupings of foreign employees, and these are reproduced here. Previously neglected issues that receive some attention are foreign births, family presence, foreign schoolchildren and duration of residence (the latter available only for the UAE). The emergence of the kafala system is examined in historical context; in particular, emphasis is placed on its role in promoting irregularities in the migration, residence and employment of foreigners across the GCC. Trends in government policies are described, including the recent and significant doubts in some countries about the ability of the kafala system to produce satisfactory outcomes. Some attention is paid to the important policies of nationalization’ of GCC labour markets: a conceptual categorization of such policies is made, according to five different policy objectives. Using both the broad and more detailed sectoral employment data previously presented, evaluation is then made of the degree of success of each country’s initiatives in this area. The paper concludes with an exposition of the commonalities and differences across the GCC in managing their labour markets and immigration. The structural specificities of each country are outlined, along with tentative prognoses of their future needs for immigrant workers.
Year 2011
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63 Report
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