Theoretical / Conceptual

Showing page of 26 results, sorted by

Perceived psychological contract fulfillment and job attitudes among repatriates

Authors Shu-Cheng Steve Chi, Shu-Chen Chen
Year 2007
Journal Name INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANPOWER
Citations (WoS) 16
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1 Journal Article

'Walk with your head high': African and African-Caribbean fatherhood, children's mental well-being and social capital

Authors Robert Williams, Alistair Hewison, Chris Wagstaff, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name ETHNICITY & HEALTH
Citations (WoS) 2
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2 Journal Article

'Walk with your head high': African and African-Caribbean fatherhood, children's mental well-being and social capital

Authors Robert Williams, Alistair Hewison, Chris Wagstaff, ...
Year 2012
Journal Name ETHNICITY & HEALTH
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3 Journal Article

INTEGRATION EXAMINATION FOR MIGRANTS IN RUSSIA: LEGAL REGULATION AND METHODICAL PROVISION

Authors Angela Viktorovna Dolzhikova, Ekaterina Viacheslavovna Kiseleva
Year 2015
Journal Name ANNALES-ANALI ZA ISTRSKE IN MEDITERANSKE STUDIJE-SERIES HISTORIA ET SOCIOLOGIA
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4 Journal Article

Work, casualization and migration: recruitment of haitians in the acrean Amazon by agroindustry Brazilian

Authors Leticia Helena Mamed, Eurenice Oliveira de Lima
Year 2015
Journal Name NOVOS CADERNOS NAEA
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5 Journal Article

Mobility, Empire and Cross-Cultural Contacts in Mongol Eurasia

Description
This project seeks to study the Mongol Empire in its full Eurasian context. It combines a world history perspective with close reading in a huge array of primary sources in various languages (mainly Persian, Arabic and Chinese) and different historiographical traditions, and classifies the acquired information into a sophisticated prosopographical database, which records the individuals acting under Mongol rule in the 13th and 14th centuries. On the basis of this unique corpus, the project maps and analyzes mobility patterns, and the far-reaching effects that this mobility generated. More specifically, it aims: (a) to analyze modes of migrations in Mongol Eurasia: why, how, when and into where people- along with their ideas and artefacts - moved across Eurasia, portraying the full spectrum of such populations movements from the coerced to the voluntary. (b) to shed light on the economic and cultural exchange that this mobility engendered, with a stress on the religious, scientific and commercial networks both within and beyond the empire’s frontiers. (c) to reconstruct the new elite of the empire by scrutinizing the personnel of key Mongolian institutions, such as the guard, the judicial and postal systems, the diplomatic corps, and the local administration. These issues will be studied comparatively, in the period of the united Mongol empire (1206-1260) and across its four successor khanates that centred at China, Iran, Central Asia and Russia. The result will be a quantum leap forward in our understanding of the Mongol empire and its impact on world history, and a major contribution to the theoretical study of pre-modern migrations, cross-cultural contacts, nomad-sedentary relations and comparative study of empires. Moreover, the re-conceptualization of the economic and cultural exchange in Mongol Eurasia will lead to a broader and more nuanced understanding of the transition from the Middle Ages to the early modern era.
Year 2013
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6 Project

Values-based leadership effectiveness in culturally diverse workplaces

Authors Willie Edward Hopkins, Susanne G. Scott
Year 2016
Journal Name CROSS CULTURAL & STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
Citations (WoS) 4
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7 Journal Article

The Migration State in the Global South: Nationalizing, Developmental, and Neoliberal Models of Migration Management

Authors Fiona B. Adamson, Gerasimos Tsourapas
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration Review
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8 Journal Article

Unequal Europe, unequal Brexit: How intra-European inequalities shape the unfolding and framing of Brexit

Authors Simone Varriale, Lorenza Antonucci
Year 2019
Journal Name Current Sociology
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9 Journal Article

Refugee Organizations’ Public Communication: Conceptualizing and Exploring New Avenues for an Underdeveloped Research Subject

Authors David Ongenaert
Year 2019
Journal Name Media and Communication
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10 Journal Article

Non‐state authoritarianism and diaspora politics

Authors Fiona B. Adamson
Year 2019
Journal Name Global Networks
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11 Journal Article

Sending States and the Making of Intra-Diasporic Politics: Turkey and Its Diaspora(s)

Authors Fiona B. Adamson
Year 2019
Journal Name International Migration Review
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12 Journal Article

Labor Pioneers: Economy, Labor, and Migration in Filipino-Danish Relations, 1950-2015

Authors Nina Trige Andersen
Year 2019
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13 Book

Determinants of ‘Mobilisation’ at Home and Abroad: Analysing the Micro-Foundations of Out-Migration & Mass Protest

Principal investigator Sorana Toma (Principal Investigator)
Description
Recent political and economic crises have destabilised various regions across the globe. When institutional politics fail, people can choose to ‘vote with their feet’, either by protesting and/or migrating. We have seen both mass protest and out-migration among post-communist countries in Eastern Europe, post-authoritarian countries in Latin America and post-colonial countries in the Middle East and North Africa (CNTS 2016; IOM 2016). The interrelationship of migration and protest has real world impact; changes in EU foreign policy (Ukrainian protests in 2013-14 resulted in confrontation between the EU and Russia), the content of national electoral campaigns (MENA migration influencing German/French electoral rhetoric), the dynamics of EU integration (views of immigration shaping Brexit), and US politics (the border wall with Mexico). While the relationship between protest and migration has been theorised at the macro-level (De Haas and Sigona 2012) it is rarely studied at the individual level (Hirschman 1993). This is remarkable given that the theoretical and empirical expectations as to what drives both migration and protest overlap significantly. Coordinated research on protest and migration is urgently needed. We will explore the individual-level choices that citizens face in the contemporary political economy. Our central research question asks: when the state fails to respond to the economic or political needs of citizens, why do some people mobilise by protesting in the streets while others ‘mobilise’ by crossing borders? And how do the choices of protest and out-migration relate to each other? The choice between migration and protest may not be dichotomous. Protest may beget migration and vice versa. Although most people are unlikely to engage in either, among those who do mobilise, protesters feeling disappointed by, or fearful of, repression may decide to migrate abroad. Once abroad, migrants may participate in origin country focused protests, and returned migrants may join protests at home. Regular contact with migrants abroad might also encourage protest activity among family members and friends left behind.While there is a large body of research on the micro-foundations of protest mobilization at home (Beissinger 2013; Gould 1993; Muller and Opp 1986; Onuch 2014a; Opp 1990; Snow et al.. 1980; J. A. Tucker 2007), the drivers of international migration (Castles, Haas, and Miller 2013; Cooray and Schneider 2016; Garip 2016; Massey et al. 1993, 1999; Toma and Vause 2014), and the political engagement of migrants on homeland issues (Ahmadov and Sasse 2016; Bloemraad and Trost 2008; Burgess 2012; Chaudhary 2017; Klandermans, van der Toorn, and van Stekelenburg 2008; Lafleur and Sanchez- Dominguez 2015), there is none on the initial choice between protest or migration. We do not know how the decision to protest might be influenced by migration, or vice versa, or whether individuals make some well-defined cognitive trade-off between protest and migration (and non-action), or whether the process is more complicated and endogenous. We will study protest and migration concurrently and comparatively across space and time, in origin and destination countries, the first major inter-disciplinary and cross- national comparative study to do so. We build on two theoretical foundations: contentious politics with its emphasis on the determinants of protest behaviour, and migration research on the drivers of out-migration as well as migrant transnational engagement. This combined theoretical framework allows a focus on three levels of analysis; a) the individual-level – investigating whether similar factors drive the choice to migrate and/or protest; b) the macro-level – assessing how context affects this mobilisation; c) and the meso-level – analysing whether these two phenomena are independent of each other, mutually reinforcing or undermining. By confronting theories on migration with those on protest, the project will make a major contribution to theory development in both fields of study.MOBILISE employs a multi-method (nationally representative face-to-face panel surveys, online migrant surveys, protest participant surveys, focus groups, life-history interviews, social media analysis) and multi-sited research design. It covers Ukraine, Poland, Morocco and Argentina, which have all recently witnessed both large-scale emigration and protest mobilization. It follows migrants from these countries to Germany, the UK and Spain. This novel and comprehensive approach will provide us with a holistic perspective on the micro-foundations of both migration and protest, allowing us to understand empirically what leads people to engage in these two types of mobilization (or not to engage in them). The project offers four key innovations: 1) it conceptually and empirically combines protest and migration; 2) it captures the relevant groups for the comparison (protesters, migrants, migrant protesters and people who have neither engaged in migration nor protest); 3) it tracks individuals over time employing a panel survey method (re-interviewing the same individuals); 4) its mixed-method design includes the use of social media data providing information on the role of networks and political remittances in real time.
Year 2019
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14 Project

The Small World of Migrant-led Development. A Sociology of ‘Migrant Associations’ Recognition Process in the French Cooperation for Development Arenas, 1981–2014.

Year 2018
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17 Doctoral Dissertation

Confrontational yet submissive: Calculated ambivalence and populist parties’ strategies of responding to racism accusations in the media

Authors Niko Hatakka, Mari K Niemi, Matti Välimäki
Year 2017
Journal Name Discourse & Society
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18 Journal Article

Highly Skilled Migration and International Flows of Talent, Knowledge, and Capital

Principal investigator Ernest Miguelez (Principal Investigator)
Description
Highly Skilled Migration and International Flows of Talent, Knowledge, and Capital (TKC) is a project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR). TKC aims to improve our understanding of whether and how highly skilled migrants activate their social networks and leverage their role as international knowledge gatekeepers, contribute to solve cross-border information problems, and transform the brain drain into brain gain and brain circulation. Highly skilled workers play a key role in today’s knowledge economies, as they introduce and diffuse innovations that encourage economic growth and well-being. Migrants are an essential component of these highly skilled workers worldwide: in 2013, the worldwide stock of migrants stood at 230 million, namely 3.2% of worldwide population (UN-DESA and OECD, 2013). However, important variations emerge across skills’ groups: tertiary educated immigrants living in OECD countries augmented by 70% during the 2000s, with just 10% for low-educated ones. Migration rates for the tertiary educated are higher than for the rest of the population, and generally increase with further education. Thus, differently from the past, highly skilled individuals represent the most dynamic component of international mobility flows. Far from taking place exclusively along a South-North or East-West axis, highly skilled migration occurs also between advanced economies, with the UK, Germany and other European countries as both destinations and origins. Science, technology, and engineering migration contributes heavily to these trends, including to its geographical variation. TKC’s research topic stands at the cross-roads of different disciplinary approaches, ranging from the geography of innovation, the economics of migration, and IB studies. All of them can be re-examined within the general theoretical framework of diaspora economics. Constant and Zimmermann (2016) define diasporas as “well-defined group(s) of migrants and their offspring with a joined cultural identity and ongoing identification with the country or culture of origin”, and propose to put them at centre-stage in all studies concerning migrations. While migration is the necessary precondition for diasporas to exist, not all migrant groups are internally bound by diasporic ties, nor ethnicity is the only source of such ties. In the case of highly skilled migrants, professional ties matter, too, as they both imply different migration channels and cohorts, and allows for specific forms of interaction. TKC is a theoretical and empirical project, whose deliverables will consist in research papers and open access datasets. Its ambition is to enrich the debate on migration on a global scale, but especially in Europe and France, where the dominant focus on low skilled or refugee immigration both obscures the importance of highly skilled flows and contributes to negative stereotyping. TKC will be articulated in six work-packages, taking a complementary approach between the macro (country), meso (firm), and micro (individual) levels of analysis. TKC has a strong engagement towards collecting micro-data concerning specific categories of very highly skilled workers, such as inventors, scientists and executives, with the migrant status to be ascertained by available biographic information and/or name analysis. These data may provide a suitable and interesting alternative to more classic data sources, both because of their detail and for their pointing at homogenous professional groups, rather than generically tertiary educated workers.
Year 2017
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19 Project

The Growing Importance of Diaspora Politics

Authors Fiona B. Adamson
Year 2016
Journal Name Current History
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20 Journal Article

Analyzing intra-regional migration in Sub-Saharan Africa: Statistical data constraints and the role for regional organizations

Authors Stefano degli Uberti, Philippe De Lombaerde, Sonja Nita, ...
Year 2015
Journal Name Regions and Cohesion
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21 Journal Article

INTERPRETING THE IMMIGRATION POLICIES IN SPAIN FROM THE DEBATE TRANSNATIONALISM -METHODOLOGICAL NATIONALISM

Authors ÁLVARO MORCILLO-ESPINA
Year 2013
Journal Name MIGRACIONES
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23 Journal Article

De la sorpresa a la incertidumbre: abriendo etapas en el estudio de la temática género y migración en el contexto español

Authors Laura Oso Casas, Natalia Ribas Mateos
Year 2012
Journal Name Papers. Revista de Sociologia
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24 Journal Article

LAS MIGRACIONES BOLIVIANAS EN LA ENCRUCIJADA INTERDISCIPLINAR: EVOLUCIÓN, CAMBIOS Y TENDENCIAS

Authors Carlota Solé, Sònia Parella, Alisa Petroff
Year 2010
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25 Book

Crossing Borders: International Migration and National Security

Authors Fiona B. Adamson
Year 2006
Journal Name International Security
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26 Journal Article
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